Gay Men Wearing Blinders

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 28, 2016 2:58 AM GMT
    I'm astounded at how many homosexuals are so quick to defend Muslims yet will bash Christianity in a heartbeat. I think it's because gay men grew up being oppressed so as adults they tend to try their hardest not to be like their oppressors (which is a good thing), but.....this very phenomenon also causes them to look at the world with blinders on. For example, in the U.S., a gay man will VERY quickly bash a Christian because most likely it was Christians who made him feel inadequate as a child. But enter Islam where people of this religion regularly throw gay men off buildings, stone them to death, hang them and burn them alive and they will rush to defend them. All because it wasn't Muslims who oppressed them as children. And please don't come back with the whole "most Muslims are peaceful" because most Christians are peaceful too, so that's not even the point. My question is why can't gay men see their own double standard here?
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    Jul 28, 2016 3:48 AM GMT
    UMayNeverKnow saidI'm still holding my breath waiting for metta to post a link to the story of the 84 year old Catholic priest knifed to death by the Muslim in France.



    I predict you'll be turning a beautiful shade of blue.
  • highforthis

    Posts: 681

    Jul 28, 2016 3:50 AM GMT
    Brand new profile barely a month old, knows all about Metta and his ways lol... I wonder whose sock this is icon_lol.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 28, 2016 4:31 AM GMT
    Christianity is very, very familiar to most people in America and by the time you're 21 here, you likely have formed a moderate to strong opinion. "In God We Trust". "God Bless America" "The Battle Hymn of the Republic"... from military, to boy scouts to catholic schools to weddings, funerals, politics and on... views on Christianity are boldly expressed here in the US. Most of us have at least one family member and likely even several family members who are vocally Christian. So it's not just about the oppression, it's also about the extent of our experiences in general with Christianity.

    However, when people IN THE US hear "muslim" they have a way more vague and cloudy view and minimal personal experiences to fall on. "Is Muslim a race, a religion a political belief or lifestyle?" "What does Sharia Law mean and is it connected with being Muslim like they say?" among many other questions. And frankly, most aren't even interested enough to even care as much. Very few people know someone whom they could ask questions, much less feel comfortable asking seemingly stupid or even potentially offensive questions. So that ambiguity causes people to reserve their comments and not have strong opinions outside of fear about the unknown.
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    Jul 28, 2016 5:15 PM GMT
    woodfordr saidChristianity is very, very familiar to most people in America and by the time you're 21 here, you likely have formed a moderate to strong opinion. "In God We Trust". "God Bless America" "The Battle Hymn of the Republic"... from military, to boy scouts to catholic schools to weddings, funerals, politics and on... views on Christianity are boldly expressed here in the US. Most of us have at least one family member and likely even several family members who are vocally Christian. So it's not just about the oppression, it's also about the extent of our experiences in general with Christianity.

    However, when people IN THE US hear "muslim" they have a way more vague and cloudy view and minimal personal experiences to fall on. "Is Muslim a race, a religion a political belief or lifestyle?" "What does Sharia Law mean and is it connected with being Muslim like they say?" among many other questions. And frankly, most aren't even interested enough to even care as much. Very few people know someone whom they could ask questions, much less feel comfortable asking seemingly stupid or even potentially offensive questions. So that ambiguity causes people to reserve their comments and not have strong opinions outside of fear about the unknown.


    Very well put.
  • Fireworkz

    Posts: 606

    Jul 28, 2016 11:04 PM GMT
    I am quick to defend Christians and muslims. Given that half of my good friends are muslim and some are gay muslims I'm not going to bash a religion.
    Just as I don't bash Christianity.
    In fact I respect all religions. In their essence they are great. The problem is that people have corrupted them, it is the same with Islam. There are no muslims throwing people of buildings where I live. My muslim friends know that I am gay and not trying to stone me to death.

    In Islam. There are different sects with different views same as you get Catholics, Baptists, 7 day Adventists etc. in Christianity you get different factions of Islam. You get moderate muslims and orthodox same as you get with Christians and Jews.

    If you want to know the true enemy then you should get to know who the enemy really is rather than blanketing everyone. The violent are the Jihadists.
    I think you'll find that people are defending muslims because they are trying to make a distinction between Muslims, the Jihadists and other factions of islam.
    People are defending their next door neighbours and friends which they should rightly do.

  • Apparition

    Posts: 3529

    Jul 29, 2016 2:54 AM GMT
    all religion is psychosis and should be treated as such. There is no difference among ANY of them.
  • mcbrion

    Posts: 305

    Jul 29, 2016 4:53 AM GMT
    woodfordr saidChristianity is very, very familiar to most people in America and by the time you're 21 here, you likely have formed a moderate to strong opinion. "In God We Trust". "God Bless America" "The Battle Hymn of the Republic"... from military, to boy scouts to catholic schools to weddings, funerals, politics and on... views on Christianity are boldly expressed here in the US. Most of us have at least one family member and likely even several family members who are vocally Christian. So it's not just about the oppression, it's also about the extent of our experiences in general with Christianity.

    However, when people IN THE US hear "muslim" they have a way more vague and cloudy view and minimal personal experiences to fall on. "Is Muslim a race, a religion a political belief or lifestyle?" "What does Sharia Law mean and is it connected with being Muslim like they say?" among many other questions. And frankly, most aren't even interested enough to even care as much. Very few people know someone whom they could ask questions, much less feel comfortable asking seemingly stupid or even potentially offensive questions. So that ambiguity causes people to reserve their comments and not have strong opinions outside of fear about the unknown.


    +1,000
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 29, 2016 5:05 AM GMT
    Fireworkz said
    In fact I respect all religions. In their essence they are great. The problem is that people have corrupted them, it is the same with Islam.




    I must respectfully disagree with you here. Any religion that is based on a book that calls for the torture and murder of anyone who disagrees with it is corrupt from the start.
  • Aleco_Graves

    Posts: 708

    Jul 29, 2016 5:10 AM GMT
    I have a colleague and shes lovely, always honest and nice and to the point. She had a baby and we had party after party for her. She went on maternity leave, and lne day she came by the office to show little Essop. I got to hold him and it was sweet. Then she said, dont hold him too long, i dont want him to become gay like you.... In office. With my seniors and the juniors below me present.

    I feel equally little for any organized religion. You do have a point i have noticed the lashings at christianity, but the respect for religion that shoot gays in a courtyard as an example.
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    Jul 29, 2016 5:11 AM GMT
    Apparition saidall religion is psychosis and should be treated as such. There is no difference among ANY of them.


    It doesn't really matter what any of us think. The tide of events will be determined by the masses and not by any government entity.

    http://www.breitbart.com/london/2016/07/28/catholic-priest-christians-have-a-moral-duty-to-defeat-terror/
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    Jul 29, 2016 5:14 AM GMT
    Aleco_Graves saidI have a colleague and shes lovely, always honest and nice and to the point. She had a baby and we had party after party for her. She went on maternity leave, and lne day she came by the office to show little Essop. I got to hold him and it was sweet. Then she said, dont hold him too long, i dont want him to become gay like you.... In office. With my seniors and the juniors below me present.

    I feel equally little for any organized religion. You do have a point i have noticed the lashings at christianity, but the respect for religion that shoot gays in a courtyard as an example.



    What religion is your colleague?
  • Aleco_Graves

    Posts: 708

    Jul 29, 2016 6:06 AM GMT
    Radd said
    Aleco_Graves saidI have a colleague and shes lovely, always honest and nice and to the point. She had a baby and we had party after party for her. She went on maternity leave, and lne day she came by the office to show little Essop. I got to hold him and it was sweet. Then she said, dont hold him too long, i dont want him to become gay like you.... In office. With my seniors and the juniors below me present.

    I feel equally little for any organized religion. You do have a point i have noticed the lashings at christianity, but the respect for religion that shoot gays in a courtyard as an example.



    What religion is your colleague?


    Oh sorry, Muslim
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 29, 2016 6:28 AM GMT
    Radd saidI'm astounded at how many homosexuals are so quick to defend Muslims yet will bash Christianity in a heartbeat. I think it's because gay men grew up being oppressed so as adults they tend to try their hardest not to be like their oppressors (which is a good thing), but.....this very phenomenon also causes them to look at the world with blinders on. For example, in the U.S., a gay man will VERY quickly bash a Christian because most likely it was Christians who made him feel inadequate as a child. But enter Islam where people of this religion regularly throw gay men off buildings, stone them to death, hang them and burn them alive and they will rush to defend them. All because it wasn't Muslims who oppressed them as children. And please don't come back with the whole "most Muslims are peaceful" because most Christians are peaceful too, so that's not even the point. My question is why can't gay men see their own double standard here?




    I think your question is catered to a specific audience. Direct it to a black gay audience and your answer to your silly privileged question will find the true answer.
  • ANTiSociaLiNJ...

    Posts: 1163

    Jul 29, 2016 7:10 AM GMT
    The problem with Islam and Muslim followers is that they perpetuate the archaism found in the Koran which is nearly identical to that found in the bible. There are people who want to literally translate the bible but due to western civilization stoning your wife for any reason you see fit or anyone who works on the Sabbath simply doesn't mesh well with modern society.

    Islam also has another twist. Muhammad, the scummy pedophile-mass murdering-schizophrenic lived during the Middle Ages which is a lot more recent compared to Jesus's time on Earth. I'm not saying that if Jesus were violent and corrupt like Muhammad that the western world would have an ideology similar to that of the Middle East. But Muhammad left a strong impression for followers of Islam. He was not only a (false) prophet but he was a military man and was exceedingly barbaric. His role in the Islamic religion has heavily influenced how Islam is practiced today. It's horrible that a devout Muslim will attack you for insulting Islam. I would be killed for what I just said above about Muhammad.

    Christianity and Judaism have had their barbaric moments in history as well. The only difference is, Christians and Jews have moved along with time to be in the present modern world and, for the most part, do not strive to live in a theocracy based on violence. I think Islam is the worst influence of all religions. With that being said, I do believe that there are some peaceful Muslims. But they are in the minority, sadly.
  • bro4bro

    Posts: 1035

    Jul 29, 2016 4:27 PM GMT
    My experience with Muslims is that even the "peaceful" ones will not speak up against the Koran. Mohammed said "Do not take Christians and Jews as your friends," and "Only the believers are your brethren." Many Muslims may break those rules but nobody is willing to stand up and say, "These are not the words of God."

    By contrast, the "Christian" stoning and barbaric acts, and various "laws" of Leviticus, were explicitly condemned by Jesus, who is quite an important figure in the Christian religion.

    In other words, the "good" Christians tend to be the ones who act according to Jesus's word, while the "good" Muslims tend to be the ones who do not act according to Mohammed's.

    Am I missing something?

    By the way, I'm completely convinced that Christianity is a silly fable - but Islam is a dangerous fable.
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    Jul 29, 2016 7:05 PM GMT
    BeautyGuyRu said
    Radd saidI'm astounded at how many homosexuals are so quick to defend Muslims yet will bash Christianity in a heartbeat. I think it's because gay men grew up being oppressed so as adults they tend to try their hardest not to be like their oppressors (which is a good thing), but.....this very phenomenon also causes them to look at the world with blinders on. For example, in the U.S., a gay man will VERY quickly bash a Christian because most likely it was Christians who made him feel inadequate as a child. But enter Islam where people of this religion regularly throw gay men off buildings, stone them to death, hang them and burn them alive and they will rush to defend them. All because it wasn't Muslims who oppressed them as children. And please don't come back with the whole "most Muslims are peaceful" because most Christians are peaceful too, so that's not even the point. My question is why can't gay men see their own double standard here?




    I think your question is catered to a specific audience. Direct it to a black gay audience and your answer to your silly privileged question will find the true answer.



    You don't seem to be very bright. It's a legitimate question and questions cannot be "privileged." And what do blacks have to do with this?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 29, 2016 7:10 PM GMT
    bro4bro said
    In other words, the "good" Christians tend to be the ones who act according to Jesus's word, while the "good" Muslims tend to be the ones who do not act according to Mohammed's.

    Am I missing something?



    Nope. You pretty much nailed it.
  • Tawrich

    Posts: 67

    Jul 29, 2016 7:26 PM GMT
    To me it's an issue of political and social influence. Islam is still largely reviled here (may fare slightly better in the black community but I doubt very much) while evangelical Christians are continuously courted by the GOP for strategic reasons that recent events have shown are unsound.
  • bro4bro

    Posts: 1035

    Jul 29, 2016 11:36 PM GMT
    Well, now you're just being naive. Christians are courted by the Republican Party for one reason, and one reason only: VOTES.

    The strategy seems to have paid off for decades.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14372

    Jul 30, 2016 1:49 PM GMT
    woodfordr saidChristianity is very, very familiar to most people in America and by the time you're 21 here, you likely have formed a moderate to strong opinion. "In God We Trust". "God Bless America" "The Battle Hymn of the Republic"... from military, to boy scouts to catholic schools to weddings, funerals, politics and on... views on Christianity are boldly expressed here in the US. Most of us have at least one family member and likely even several family members who are vocally Christian. So it's not just about the oppression, it's also about the extent of our experiences in general with Christianity.

    However, when people IN THE US hear "muslim" they have a way more vague and cloudy view and minimal personal experiences to fall on. "Is Muslim a race, a religion a political belief or lifestyle?" "What does Sharia Law mean and is it connected with being Muslim like they say?" among many other questions. And frankly, most aren't even interested enough to even care as much. Very few people know someone whom they could ask questions, much less feel comfortable asking seemingly stupid or even potentially offensive questions. So that ambiguity causes people to reserve their comments and not have strong opinions outside of fear about the unknown.
    Most people form a strong to moderate opinion about religion by the time they turn 18. It doesn't take long to realize that forcing religious belief upon others is a form of brainwashing. I was raised in a conservative Catholic family where we were forced to go to church every Sunday and holy day of obligation until we graduated from high school. If we didn't like it than we were shown the front door and told to pack our bags and go live someplace else.