What are your thoughts about watches that can make and receive phone calls and texts?

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    Aug 11, 2016 2:07 AM GMT
    Samsung Gear S2

    LG Watch Urbane 2nd Edition LTE

    http://www.tomsguide.com/us/smartwatch-buying-guide,review-3360.html

    A smartwatch can help you stay connected and multitask so you never miss a beat. Whether you’d rather keep your phone stashed away or you always find yourself missing important calls, smartwatches sync with your smartphone so you can manage your digital life conveniently and discreetly. Many even double as activity trackers, helping you monitor your health. Use this guide to help you choose the best smartwatch for your needs.
    http://www.bestbuy.com/site/buying-guides/smartwatch-buying-guide/pcmcat333300050009.c?id=pcmcat333300050009

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    Aug 11, 2016 2:09 AM GMT
    I love my Apple Watch!
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    Aug 11, 2016 2:11 AM GMT
    http://www.apple.com/watch/guided-tours/
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    Aug 11, 2016 2:12 AM GMT
    In most cases do you have to get phone and a watch?
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    Aug 11, 2016 2:15 AM GMT
    You do have to. But it is extremely inconvenience to get the phone out and unlock it and so on and so on. In my office, I can walk around and all phone calls would be routed to my watch so I can be anywhere. Same with at home. With texting, it is easy to view the incoming text and for replies you can just dictate like talking to Siri. It even understand punctuations. And when you finish dictating the text. You can press it on the watch and off it goes.
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    Aug 11, 2016 2:59 AM GMT
    You talk to the watch on your wrist and you listen by putting the watch on your wrist to your ear? Any alternative ways--bluetooth headset?
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    Aug 11, 2016 3:00 AM GMT
    woodsmen saidYou do have to. But it is extremely inconvenience to get the phone out and unlock it and so on and so on. In my office, I can walk around and all phone calls would be routed to my watch so I can be anywhere. Same with at home. With texting, it is easy to view the incoming text and for replies you can just dictate like talking to Siri. It even understand punctuations. And when you finish dictating the text. You can press it on the watch and off it goes.


    Thank you.
  • leanandclean

    Posts: 268

    Aug 11, 2016 11:58 AM GMT
    No
  • mcbrion

    Posts: 305

    Aug 11, 2016 5:37 PM GMT
    People are already too tuned in to devices. They are more tuned in to devices than they are their own inner selves, and certainly more than they are tuned in to other people. Some of us barely understand complex emotions and how to respond. Some of us will, like the Google Glasses that outraged others, get that device, because of that very reason - and because someone can make money off it - but it's unnecessary. If Timothy Leary was alive now, he's be horrified at how tuned OUT people are now. His mantra, "Turn on, Tune IN, Drop OUT," is now, "Tune Out, Turn OFF, Drop Others."
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    Aug 11, 2016 7:30 PM GMT
    I cannot see myself walking around with an iPhone in a case or a Samsung Galaxy in a case (I hear although the front may not crack, the back can shatter).
    I only want it for Close Circle: blood brother to blood brother, close cousin to close cousin, niece to uncle re: family business; and any other person who rises to that level of inner circle; maybe AAA--but someone told me you never want to get in a car wreck, as driver, wearing a watch because the watch will damage one's wrist.

    Phone calls and short texts, not really emails.

    When I was younger I cared deeply about activity friends: tennis/racquetball/museum goer/choir member/people I was dating in hopes of domestic partnership.
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    Aug 11, 2016 8:27 PM GMT
    I've had a play with the iWatch in store and it's very nicely designed, but I can't help thinking the concept is veering toward chocolate teapot territory.
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    Aug 11, 2016 8:30 PM GMT
    StephenOABC saidI cannot see myself walking around with an iPhone in a case or a Samsung Galaxy in a case (I hear although the front may not crack, the back can shatter).
    I only want it for Close Circle: blood brother to blood brother, close cousin to close cousin, niece to uncle re: family business; and any other person who rises to that level of inner circle; maybe AAA--but someone told me you never want to get in a car wreck, as driver, wearing a watch because the watch will damage one's wrist.

    Phone calls and short texts, not really emails.

    When I was younger I cared deeply about activity friends: tennis/racquetball/museum goer/choir member/people I was dating in hopes of domestic partnership.


    One thing that the Apple Watch allows you to do is to send your love ones your own heartbeats as recorded by a heart unit in the Apple Watch.
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    Aug 11, 2016 8:54 PM GMT
    StephenOABC said
    In most cases do you have to get phone and a watch?

    You must have an iPhone in the case of the first generation Apple Watch. The watch is essentially "tethered" to the phone, and relies upon the phone to perform its more complex functions. There is speculation that the next generation Apple Watch will be more autonomous, but I don't know in what ways.

    We use our watches primarily to notify us of incoming texts and emails, like a pager function. We could answer them on the watch, but why bother when our phones are right in our pockets? But with our bad hearing we often would miss those alerts in our pockets. The watch chimes, displays and vibrates on our wrist, where we're more likely to notice it.

    The watch, when connected to the iPhone, also gives a range of current & futures weather info we find useful. It additionally displays our calendar events for the day. Again, very practical for us. You can customize this display to many different things. Although stuff like the phases of the moon don't really interest us, so we didn't include those on our personalized set-up.
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    Aug 11, 2016 9:01 PM GMT
    mcbrion saidPeople are already too tuned in to devices. They are more tuned in to devices than they are their own inner selves, and certainly more than they are tuned in to other people. Some of us barely understand complex emotions and how to respond. Some of us will, like the Google Glasses that outraged others, get that device, because of that very reason - and because someone can make money off it - but it's unnecessary. If Timothy Leary was alive now, he's be horrified at how tuned OUT people are now. His mantra, "Turn on, Tune IN, Drop OUT," is now, "Tune Out, Turn OFF, Drop Others."

    I understand your point of view. But in our case we use technology to stay MORE in touch with friends and other people. And not just to communicate with them that way. But to keep us on schedule for gatherings, to take their calls. Phoning them any time or place we want. For us technology is an aid, not an end unto itself.
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    Aug 11, 2016 10:10 PM GMT
    redundant; i have seenicon_eek.gif cell phones that can receive phone calls and texts
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    Aug 12, 2016 3:10 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    StephenOABC said
    In most cases do you have to get phone and a watch?

    You must have an iPhone in the case of the first generation Apple Watch. The watch is essentially "tethered" to the phone, and relies upon the phone to perform its more complex functions. There is speculation that the next generation Apple Watch will be more autonomous, but I don't know in what ways.

    We use our watches primarily to notify us of incoming texts and emails, like a pager function. We could answer them on the watch, but why bother when our phones are right in our pockets? But with our bad hearing we often would miss those alerts in our pockets. The watch chimes, displays and vibrates on our wrist, where we're more likely to notice it.

    The watch, when connected to the iPhone, also gives a range of current & futures weather info we find useful. It additionally displays our calendar events for the day. Again, very practical for us. You can customize this display to many different things. Although stuff like the phases of the moon don't really interest us, so we didn't include those on our personalized set-up.


    Thank you.

    I just thought of something while reading your post: a simple Things to Do List: Buy Creatine, Cleaners. So, if I'm in a grocery store, I could just glance at my watch.
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    Aug 12, 2016 3:18 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    StephenOABC said
    In most cases do you have to get phone and a watch?

    You must have an iPhone in the case of the first generation Apple Watch. The watch is essentially "tethered" to the phone, and relies upon the phone to perform its more complex functions. There is speculation that the next generation Apple Watch will be more autonomous, but I don't know in what ways.


    What is the distance on this tethering?

    One reason I ask, there has been an elderly family member who accidentally put a walking cane on a leaf and fell in the garage and had to crawl into the house to a sofa to get up.

    A woman can carry the phone in a hidden compartment of a bag/purse and have the watch on the wrist. I do not know what a man can do.