Doctor, Can I Give Hospital Patient Supplements? Doctor: I Cannot Comment on Nutrition Supplements

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    Aug 14, 2016 4:46 PM GMT
    Patient: Help Me.

    The doctor cannot comment on Omega 3.
    The doctor cannot comment on Curcumin.
    The doctor cannot comment on Bromelain.
    The doctor cannot comment on Cell Salts.
    The doctor cannot comment on Arnica.

    The hospital would be held liable.

    Are Naturopathic Doctors Barred from Hospitals?
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    Aug 14, 2016 5:27 PM GMT
    When a Hospital MD cannot comment on a supplement, how can liability fall to the Naturopathic Doctor?

    Doctor, Can I Give Hospital Patient Supplements?
    Doctor: I Cannot Comment on Nutrition Supplements

    Patient: Help Me.

    The doctor cannot comment on Omega 3.
    The doctor cannot comment on Borage Oil.
    The doctor cannot comment on Curcumin.
    The doctor cannot comment on Bromelain.
    The doctor cannot comment on Cell Salts.
    The doctor cannot comment on Arnica.
    The doctor cannot comment on Ashwagandha (even though my mom can no longer stand up or pull herself up from a seated position).
    Can the doctor comment on MSM?

    ~ ~ ~

    The C Reactive Protein (CRP) was 200 at patient admission.
    It is down to 180.

    I have Dr. D'Adamo's books, one of which is Arthritis.

    I asked Life Extension Foundation which of their blood tests measures inflammation.
    C Reactive Protein was the answer.
    I asked the hospital nurse did she know of a drug to help bring down the C Reactive Protein score.
    She said she did not know of a drug to bring down the C Reactive Protein, the patient is only getting pain medicine and an antibiotic for the Urinary Tract Infection, which in the elderly can have effects beyond the urinary tract.

    Fine. The patient (my mom) is in tremendous pain. I'm thinking, the higher the CRP the higher the pain.

    Now why wouldn't there be a drug to bring down the CRP score?
    Possible answer: the CRP goes up due to stress. Pain medicine relieves stress. The CRP will go down as the pain medicine works.

    Maybe my mom has more than arthritis, she might have cancer. I know cancer causes pain.

    ~ ~ ~

    Family members of the patient can bring in Kentucky Fried Chicken into the hospital (Texas) and give it to the patient but anything in pill form puts the hospital at risk.

    I was able to get the patient on 200 mg of Co-Q10 because since 2009, I got my mom to present this to her doctor who said, yes, at your age and given your conditions, Co-Q10 is good for your heart--instead of taking 10 mg of Ubiquinol like your health nut son is taking, take 200 mg of Co-Q10, it does not have to be Ubquinol.

    In Summary, can a Naturopathic Doctor be part of a medical care team with an MD?
    As I age, I would like to have my supplements in my end-stage of life, in a hospital.
    Please tell me supplements and Naturopathic Doctors are allowed (if not welcomed) in Connecticut and New York hospitals. Is it state by state or is the federal protection for patients following Naturopathic protocols?

    http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?m-1471195610/
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    Aug 14, 2016 5:32 PM GMT
    As for Arnica, yesterday, I checked and found what appears below.

    Moderate interaction

    Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs) interacts with ARNICA

    Arnica might slow blood clotting. Taking Arnica along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.

    Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.
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    Aug 14, 2016 6:27 PM GMT
    We had a good friend in the hospital for most of last week, came home yesterday. I wouldn't so much as give him a candy bar from the hospital gift shop while he was there, unless it was approved. But we did bring him newspapers, that he likes to read.

    No, a hospital patient, whether yourself or someone else, is totally governed by the doctors and hospital. Don't interfere with that.

    At the same time, with family or a loved one, you can monitor their treatment. I was bedside with my late partner as he was dying, 16 hours a day, and checked all his meds. I caught a few that were wrong. It's not that uncommon.

    In fact, a month ago a pharmacy was going to dispense meds to me that are triple what I should be getting. If they didn't kill me they sure as hell would have knocked me out.

    But I know my own meds, and refused to accept them when wrong, made the pharmacy call my doctor back. Well, a lot of excuses flying back and forth about "transmission" errors, but somebody screwed up.

    Point is, know what your meds are. Or your partner's are. Last week at his cardiologist's I had hadda rattle off to the nurse a dozen meds he takes, because he never remembers any of them. It's whatcha do with a partner.
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    Aug 15, 2016 12:28 AM GMT
    I could point out the complete problem with a "naturopathic doctor", especially as upwards of 90% of the stuff I've heard come out of the mouths of Naturopaths was scientifically innaccurate, or utter crap. The problem with a degree in Chemistry (which, in the end, is the core of nutrition science, pharmaceutical science, biochemistry etc) is you *know* when what they are saying is crap - I heard one being interviewed on a local radio station, and it was everything I could do to resist calling the station and asking them why they were giving free publicity to either an utter quack, or someone so out of touch with reality that he could be endangering the lives of the people he "treats"

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    Aug 15, 2016 1:25 AM GMT
    Well, I'm not intimidated by doctors, nor by anyone, really.

    Our first visit to his new cardiologist, after his open heart surgery, the doctor started lecturing us about going on a vegan diet.

    "Don't eat anything that has a face," he said. Meaning nothing with eyes and a mouth. I'm still not sure about clams, oysters, mussels and such.

    But anyway, I was kinda offended by him talking down to us. Just tell us what he shouldn't eat. We're big boys, we can figure it out from there. But I was insulted by his approach, like we were pre-schoolers.

    So I said to him. "Can C**** eat fish? I thought that was healthy."

    "No, not anything that has a face."

    "Well, if he can't eat anything with a face, what if I put a paper bag over my head?"

    I thought the two of them were gonna die right there. Good. I didn't like the doctor's condescending attidtude. He finished up and left the exam room.

    Actually he's a very good cardiologist, and my husband is still seeing him over 3 year later. We were just there last week for a routine visit. We're really on very friendly terms. I think he's realized not to be condescending with us. With some of his elderly patients, yes, but not with us. At least not yet.
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    Aug 15, 2016 2:08 AM GMT
    Art_Deco said

    No, a hospital patient, whether yourself or someone else, is totally governed by the doctors and hospital. Don't interfere with that.



    Well, well, well, I was right to stay away from the hospital today.

    Don't interfere with them.

    They may not be giving them an IV or a midline to keep your loved one hydrated; they may let a day go by without giving your loved one a feeding tube.
    Their medicine may cause constipation or hallucinations and 15 more seconds worth of side-effects, but don't interfere.

    Fine.
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    Aug 15, 2016 2:12 AM GMT
    Art_Deco saidWe had a good friend in the hospital for most of last week, came home yesterday. I wouldn't so much as give him a candy bar from the hospital gift shop while he was there, unless it was approved. But we did bring him newspapers, that he likes to read.

    No, a hospital patient, whether yourself or someone else, is totally governed by the doctors and hospital. Don't interfere with that.

    At the same time, with family or a loved one, you can monitor their treatment. I was bedside with my late partner as he was dying, 16 hours a day, and checked all his meds. I caught a few that were wrong. It's not that uncommon.

    In fact, a month ago a pharmacy was going to dispense meds to me that are triple what I should be getting. If they didn't kill me they sure as hell would have knocked me out.

    But I know my own meds, and refused to accept them when wrong, made the pharmacy call my doctor back. Well, a lot of excuses flying back and forth about "transmission" errors, but somebody screwed up.

    Point is, know what your meds are. Or your partner's are. Last week at his cardiologist's I had hadda rattle off to the nurse a dozen meds he takes, because he never remembers any of them. It's whatcha do with a partner.


    Thank you, Art_Deco.
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    Aug 15, 2016 2:17 AM GMT
    Doctor9 saidI could point out the complete problem with a "naturopathic doctor", especially as upwards of 90% of the stuff I've heard come out of the mouths of Naturopaths was scientifically inaccurate, or utter crap. The problem with a degree in Chemistry (which, in the end, is the core of nutrition science, pharmaceutical science, biochemistry etc) is you *know* when what they are saying is crap - I heard one being interviewed on a local radio station, and it was everything I could do to resist calling the station and asking them why they were giving free publicity to either an utter quack, or someone so out of touch with reality that he could be endangering the lives of the people he "treats"



    Thank you.

    Now, be my guest.
    Explain how the history of medical usage and the studies of these are crap.

    Omega 3
    Borage Oil
    Curcumin
    Bromelain
    Cell Salts
    Arnica
    Ashwagandha

    Not one of the above is good for stress? Not one of them is good for arthritis or joint problems?

    You want to discount 90% of the field? Let's start with Homeopathy, then.

    Dr. Hahnemann and the Birth of Homeopathy
    "For well over a century, the twelve cell salt remedies have been keeping people fit and healthy. To understand how and why they work, it is necessary to take a closer look at homeopathy, the medical philosophy from which the cell salts evolved. In the 18th century, German physician and scientist Samuel Hahnemann (1755-1843) developed a medical concept which became known as homeopathy. ..."

    Hahnemann's work in homeopathic medicine led to the formation of several homeopathic institutes in Germany. Subsequently, homeopathy became a well accepted medical practice in that country.

    After Hahnemann, we have Dr. Schuessler, influenced by DR. Rudolph Virchow, the father of modern pathology.

    Rudolf Ludwig Carl Virchow was a German physician, anthropologist, pathologist, prehistorian, biologist, writer, editor, and politician, known for his advancement of public health.

    Today Schüßler's salts are also used in the production of hypoallergenic medical cosmetic products, that treat different skin conditions like: acne, dark spots, cellulite, warts, rashes, hives, dermatitis, herpes, cheilitis, skin burns. Schüßler cosmetics are also able to enhance skin moisturization, reduce wrinkle formation and increase elasticity and collagen level. Common ingredient in the Schüßler cosmetic products are different essential oils. They regenerate the epidermis, moisturize it and prevent bacterial contamination

    Biochemistry and biography of Dr. Wilhelm Schuessler
    The concept of biochemic cell salts, also known as tissue salts or just cell salts, was developed by Dr. Wilhelm Heinrich Schuessler ( 1821-1898 ), a German physician, in the late 1800s. Although moderately diluted and potentized, these remedies are not classed as homeopathic because there are not selected according to the principle of similarity which is essential to homeopathy. They are chemically pure salts, homogeneous to the cell minerals in the human body, physiologically and chemically in close relation to them. By the aid of Schuessler Salts disturbed molecular motion and imbalance of these minerals in the cells can be corrected thus restoring the health of the individual.
    http://www.schwabehealth.com/wcm/mb/schwabe/en-in/about_schwabe_dhu/wilhelm_schuessler/index.html
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    Aug 15, 2016 3:01 AM GMT
    The National Institute of Health summarized its findings on Bromelain.

    The currently available data do indicate the potential of bromelain in treating osteoarthritis of the knee (not so much the shoulder).
    It also found no adverse effects of taking Bromelain.

    My mom fell to one of her knees before not being able to use it to standup.

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    Aug 15, 2016 3:08 AM GMT
    Ashwagandha / Withania somnifera (WS)

    After the NIH finished talking about mice and hamsters ...

    In some cases of uterine fibroids, dermatosarcoma, long term treatment with WS controlled the condition.

    It has a Cognition Promoting Effect and was useful in children with memory deficit and in old age people loss of memory.

    It was also found useful in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's, Huntington's and Alzeimer's diseases.

    It has GABA mimetic effect and was shown to promote formation of dendrites.

    It has anxiolytic effect and improves energy levels and mitochondrial health.

    It is an anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic agent and was found useful in clinical cases of Rheumatoid and Osteoarthritis.

    anxiolytic: anti-anxiety
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    Aug 15, 2016 3:10 AM GMT
    So far, Ashwagandha / Withania somnifera (WS) should get a hospital doctor's okay, according to the NIH.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3252722/

    And no, my mom is not diabetic or on diabetic medicine where there is a moderate risk of drug interaction between the two.
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    Aug 15, 2016 3:28 AM GMT
    Doctor9 saidI could point out the complete problem with a "naturopathic doctor", especially as upwards of 90% of the stuff I've heard come out of the mouths of Naturopaths was scientifically innaccurate, or utter crap. The problem with a degree in Chemistry (which, in the end, is the core of nutrition science, pharmaceutical science, biochemistry etc) is you *know* when what they are saying is crap - I heard one being interviewed on a local radio station, and it was everything I could do to resist calling the station and asking them why they were giving free publicity to either an utter quack, or someone so out of touch with reality that he could be endangering the lives of the people he "treats"



    Now, let's look at Curcumin. The Mayo Clinic says this:

    Laboratory and animal research suggests that curcumin may prevent cancer, slow the spread of cancer, make chemotherapy more effective and protect healthy cells from damage by radiation therapy. Curcumin is being studied for use in many types of cancer.

    The NIH abstract says:

    The effect of curcumin was studied in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory eye diseases, inflammatory bowel disease, chronic pancreatitis, psoriasis, hyperlipidemia, and cancers. Although the preliminary results did support the efficacy of curcumin in these diseases, the data to date are all preliminary and not conclusive.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17569225

    Decision, go with the high percentage preliminary results.

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    Aug 15, 2016 2:11 PM GMT
    Update on the patient:

    I think she is on Percocet and it has impaired her thinking (to say the least).

    I'm visiting her today.

    In the meantime, I found this at https://www.cancertutor.com/cancerpain/:

    For Pain Not Caused By the Cancer
    MSM (a cousin of DMSO) or MSM plus Vitamin C

    For pain which is not caused by the cancer cells, perhaps the best natural treatment is MSM (methylsulfonylmethane or methyl sulfonyl methane). There is a classic book on MSM and pain which is highly recommended:

    The Miracle of MSM – The Natural Solution for Pain by Stanley W. Jacob, MD, et. al.

    Here is my article on how to buy and take MSM:

    How To Make MSM Water

    Here is an article on combining MSM with Vitamin C:

    MSM and Vitamin C Article

    I might add that Vitamin C and Vitamin B12 are an excellent treatment for cancer and that MSM and Vitamin C are a good combination. You might want to take all 3 while you are at it:

    MSM and Vitamin C Protocol (includes Vitamin B12)


    Read More http://www.cancertutor.com/cancerpain/
    - - -

    MSM methyl sulfonyl methane
    A deficiency of sulfur in the body can cause or exacerbate a variety of conditions including acne, arthritis, brittle nails and hair, convulsions, depression, memory loss, gastrointestinal issues, rashes and even slow wound healing.

    So, I'll add MSM to the list.
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    Aug 15, 2016 2:15 PM GMT
    I do not think the Percocet is solving the underlying problem.
    It's likely just palliative care medicine where the doctor has given up on healing the patient.
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    Aug 15, 2016 3:22 PM GMT
    StephenOABC said
    Art_Deco said

    No, a hospital patient, whether yourself or someone else, is totally governed by the doctors and hospital. Don't interfere with that.

    Well, well, well, I was right to stay away from the hospital today.

    Don't interfere with them.

    They may not be giving them an IV or a midline to keep your loved one hydrated; they may let a day go by without giving your loved one a feeding tube.
    Their medicine may cause constipation or hallucinations and 15 more seconds worth of side-effects, but don't interfere.

    Fine.

    No, that's not what I said. A person in a hospital needs visitors, if allowed.

    And in the case of my husband when in hospital I monitor all his medication. Sometimes they get it wrong, mistakes happen.

    Fortunately we have legal mutual Health Care Surrogate Agreements on file with all the medical providers and hospitals we normally use. And I carry them with us during vacations away.

    I chose a fairly prominent gay attorney, who's currently the Vice Mayor of Fort Lauderdale. I wanted a gay attorney who would know the best legal verbiage to use on those forms (and others we had drawn) to protect a gay couple in Florida. Second, I wanted a guy with name recognition. You wanna question my authority in this medical situation? Fine. Maybe your supervisor will recognize this name. Opppss...

    Most of our local hospitals are **IN** Fort Lauderdale. And actually our status as "Next of Kin" has been entered in their systems for both of us. But I'm always prepared for that falling out or being overlooked for some reason.

    Nobody ever messes with us in that regard. I hate to pull rank, as we said in the Army, something I very, very rarely did even there. But I have my fall-back position if all else fails. If my husband is ill he's gonna get care, with me at his side, no matter what it takes. I have my mission, and I will not fail. Perhaps that side of my military nature still clings to me.

    I only sometimes wish I could use that drive I use on others for myself. I've been criticized by others about this failing.. Instead. I really don't care what the f*** happens to me, and it shows. icon_sad.gif
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    Aug 15, 2016 3:32 PM GMT
    Wholistic medicine is just what it says . You are either in or out. Trying to mix allopathic with naturopathic is antithetical to both.
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    Aug 16, 2016 2:52 AM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    StephenOABC said
    Art_Deco said

    No, a hospital patient, whether yourself or someone else, is totally governed by the doctors and hospital. Don't interfere with that.

    Well, well, well, I was right to stay away from the hospital today.

    Don't interfere with them.

    They may not be giving them an IV or a midline to keep your loved one hydrated; they may let a day go by without giving your loved one a feeding tube.
    Their medicine may cause constipation or hallucinations and 15 more seconds worth of side-effects, but don't interfere.

    Fine.

    No, that's not what I said. A person in a hospital needs visitors, if allowed.

    And in the case of my husband when in hospital I monitor all his medication. Sometimes they get it wrong, mistakes happen.

    Fortunately we have legal mutual Health Care Surrogate Agreements on file with all the medical providers and hospitals we normally use. And I carry them with us during vacations away.

    I chose a fairly prominent gay attorney, who's currently the Vice Mayor of Fort Lauderdale. I wanted a gay attorney who would know the best legal verbiage to use on those forms (and others we had drawn) to protect a gay couple in Florida. Second, I wanted a guy with name recognition. You wanna question my authority in this medical situation? Fine. Maybe your supervisor will recognize this name. Opppss...

    Most of our local hospitals are **IN** Fort Lauderdale. And actually our status as "Next of Kin" has been entered in their systems for both of us. But I'm always prepared for that falling out or being overlooked for some reason.

    Nobody ever messes with us in that regard. I hate to pull rank, as we said in the Army, something I very, very rarely did even there. But I have my fall-back position if all else fails. If my husband is ill he's gonna get care, with me at his side, no matter what it takes. I have my mission, and I will not fail. Perhaps that side of my military nature still clings to me.

    I only sometimes wish I could use that drive I use on others for myself. I've been criticized by otherx about this failing.. Instead. I really don't care what the f*** happens to me, and it shows. icon_sad.gif


    Art,

    I visited my mom twice today.

    I wasn't saying that you recommended I didn't visit
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    Aug 16, 2016 3:00 AM GMT
    Reply from the Naturopathic Website www.dadamo.com (Community forums)

    A National Institute of Health abstract:

    Paleolithic and Mediterranean Diet Pattern Scores Are Inversely Associated with Biomarkers of Inflammation and Oxidative Balance in Adults.
    Whalen KA1, McCullough ML2, Flanders WD3, Hartman TJ4, Judd S5, Bostick RM6.
    Author information
    Abstract
    BACKGROUND:

    Chronic inflammation and oxidative balance are associated with poor diet quality and risk of cancer and other chronic diseases. A diet-inflammation/oxidative balance association may relate to evolutionary discordance.
    OBJECTIVE:

    We investigated associations between 2 diet pattern scores, the Paleolithic and the Mediterranean, and circulating concentrations of 2 related biomarkers, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), an acute inflammatory protein, and F2-isoprostane, a reliable marker of in vivo lipid peroxidation.
    METHODS:

    In a pooled cross-sectional study of 30- to 74-y-old men and women in an elective outpatient colonoscopy population (n = 646), we created diet scores from responses on Willett food-frequency questionnaires and measured plasma hsCRP and F2-isoprostane concentrations by ELISA and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, respectively. Both diet scores were calculated and categorized into quintiles, and their associations with biomarker concentrations were estimated with the use of general linear models to calculate and compare adjusted geometric means, and via unconditional ordinal logistic regression.
    RESULTS:

    There were statistically significant trends for decreasing geometric mean plasma hsCRP and F2-isoprostane concentrations with increasing quintiles of the Paleolithic and Mediterranean diet scores. The multivariable-adjusted ORs comparing those in the highest with those in the lowest quintiles of the Paleolithic and Mediterranean diet scores were 0.61 (95% CI: 0.36, 1.05; P-trend = 0.06) and 0.71 (95% CI: 0.42, 1.20; P-trend = 0.01), respectively, for a higher hsCRP concentration, and 0.51 (95% CI: 0.27, 0.95; P-trend 0.01) and 0.39 (95% CI: 0.21, 0.73; P-trend = 0.01), respectively, for a higher F2-isoprostane concentration.
    CONCLUSION:

    These findings suggest that diets that are more Paleolithic- or Mediterranean-like may be associated with lower levels of systemic inflammation and oxidative stress in humans.
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    Aug 16, 2016 3:07 AM GMT
    Another response:

    Most MD's generally do not know about many supplements. Their focus is on drugs and they understand how drugs work. Some cardiologists understand CoQ10 and fish oil.

    C Reactive Protein, as you know is a marker for inflammation. Chronic inflammation is the root of all disease - not just arthritis. It can be the root cause of autoimmune disease, heart disease, diabetes and cancer as well. Once your mom is out of the hospital, there are many things you can help her with to reduce her chronic inflammation. You should be careful, however, as some supplements interact negatively with drugs. For instance, you ask about curcumin. Curcumin is a natural blood thinner so one should not take aspirin and/or other blood thinners while taking curcumin.

    I am sure that each hospital has rules about supplements because, like I said, supplements CAN interact negatively with medication.

    Hope your Mom feels better soon.[/quote]

    I visited her twice today. She was doing much better.
    Why? I do not know. The Dilaudid to Percocet.
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    Aug 16, 2016 3:10 AM GMT
    Another response

    Given that NDs are not licensed in NY, there isn't a doctor I ever met that would allow an ND to be part of the medical protocol for one of their own patients
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    Aug 16, 2016 3:13 AM GMT

    This makes me sad.
    I've been taking supplements for decades and I thought I have progressed during the years. When I need them the most (in a hospital), the science isn't allowed in the hospital. Maybe I can bring in NIH abstracts on them to get permission. Maybe, maybe not.
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    Aug 16, 2016 3:15 AM GMT
    Another Reply

    Osteopathic doctors are accepted by hospitals. Some ODs are more open to natural healing practices.

    (Osteopathy is a form of drug-free non-invasive manual medicine that focuses on total body health by treating and strengthening the musculoskeletal framework, which includes the joints, muscles and spine. Its aim is to positively affect the body's nervous, circulatory and lymphatic systems.)
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    Aug 16, 2016 3:50 AM GMT
    Art_Deco
    If my husband is ill he's gonna get care, with me at his side, no matter what it takes. I have my mission, and I will not fail. Perhaps that side of my military nature still clings to me.

    I only sometimes wish I could use that drive I use on others for myself. I've been criticized by others about this failing.. Instead. I really don't care what the f*** happens to me, and it shows.

    Stephen
    Hm. Your free from the VA problems, then.
    Maybe your lawyer can draw something up that you'll be taken care of.
    You have LT Care insurance to help you?
    Is there another military gay friend?
    Is there a military gay retirement home?
    You deserve good care, Art, when the time comes. You do not go down as if you're in combat. You're a war hero, yes?
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    Aug 16, 2016 4:09 AM GMT
    StephenOABC said
    Art_Deco said
    StephenOABC said
    Art_Deco said

    No, a hospital patient, whether yourself or someone else, is totally governed by the doctors and hospital. Don't interfere with that.

    Well, well, well, I was right to stay away from the hospital today.

    Don't interfere with them.

    They may not be giving them an IV or a midline to keep your loved one hydrated; they may let a day go by without giving your loved one a feeding tube.
    Their medicine may cause constipation or hallucinations and 15 more seconds worth of side-effects, but don't interfere.

    Fine.

    No, that's not what I said. A person in a hospital needs visitors, if allowed.

    And in the case of my husband when in hospital I monitor all his medication. Sometimes they get it wrong, mistakes happen.

    Fortunately we have legal mutual Health Care Surrogate Agreements on file with all the medical providers and hospitals we normally use. And I carry them with us during vacations away.

    I chose a fairly prominent gay attorney, who's currently the Vice Mayor of Fort Lauderdale. I wanted a gay attorney who would know the best legal verbiage to use on those forms (and others we had drawn) to protect a gay couple in Florida. Second, I wanted a guy with name recognition. You wanna question my authority in this medical situation? Fine. Maybe your supervisor will recognize this name. Opppss...

    Most of our local hospitals are **IN** Fort Lauderdale. And actually our status as "Next of Kin" has been entered in their systems for both of us. But I'm always prepared for that falling out or being overlooked for some reason.

    Nobody ever messes with us in that regard. I hate to pull rank, as we said in the Army, something I very, very rarely did even there. But I have my fall-back position if all else fails. If my husband is ill he's gonna get care, with me at his side, no matter what it takes. I have my mission, and I will not fail. Perhaps that side of my military nature still clings to me.

    I only sometimes wish I could use that drive I use on others for myself. I've been criticized by otherx about this failing.. Instead. I really don't care what the f*** happens to me, and it shows. icon_sad.gif


    Art,

    I visited my mom twice today.

    I wasn't saying that you recommended I didn't visit