If you were given a chance to meet a scientist who would it be?

  • metta

    Posts: 39159

    Aug 14, 2016 6:02 PM GMT
    14045683_10155117771219392_1999092511502
  • buddycat

    Posts: 1874

    Aug 14, 2016 6:15 PM GMT
    Steven Hawking
  • metta

    Posts: 39159

    Aug 14, 2016 11:26 PM GMT
    Alan Turing, and I would try to convince him to not take the drugs the government was forcing him to take....that he was wonderful just the way he was.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 14, 2016 11:34 PM GMT
    Nikola Effing Tesla.
  • DannyLugo

    Posts: 61

    Aug 15, 2016 2:02 AM GMT
    Nicola Tesla:-) Above brilliant man whom humanity has forgotten but owes much of its present advances. Creator of the earthquake machine, the Tesla death ray, and the Tesla Roadster. NO JOKE CAR B SIK!!!
  • bro4bro

    Posts: 1035

    Aug 15, 2016 3:02 AM GMT
    I'm a scientist, anyone wanna meet me?

    But to answer the question I'd have to go with Einstein. It may sound like a trite response to a lot of you, but I think you have to be a physicist to comprehend the magnitude of what he accomplished. He basically threw away the book, started from scratch and wrote a whole new one. By comparison, Steve Hawking is just a toad in a wheelchair who got a speak-and-spell for Christmas.
  • mwolverine

    Posts: 3386

    Aug 15, 2016 3:53 AM GMT
    If Einstein came over for dinner, we'd probably end up talking about things other than science.
    (Which is good, cause after a few minutes I'd be lost.)

    I think given such an incredible opportunity I'd want to go further back in time.
    Probably Galileo, with Newton as my alternate.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 15, 2016 4:55 AM GMT
    icon_rolleyes.gif
    Well, I happen to be a scientist. And until the last few years, pretty much everyone I knew was one too.
    I have met quite a few of recently famous ones. Or at least the people you tend to see on "The Discovery Channel" and the like. Some of them I'd rather not know. Scientists are just people, you know. People who can speak in complete sentences and do math.

    Pretty much every time a group of scientists meet each other for the first time, there is a ritual butt-sniffing type of activity which involves a long, detailed, but ultimately pointless debate on how to properly calculate the respective resolutions of phone cameras and telescopes. Or the Gibbs Free Energy of Snickers bars. Or something else which looses all relevance after the first decimal point (though of course, for form, one goes for fourteen.) You know... When nerdiosity is more dominant than biceps.

    Some of the best money I've ever spent was sitting quietly at a table of Nobel laureates and/or NASA old-timers, saying little, but buying bottle after bottle of wine. (I swam in those circles for a little while, in the mid-90's. Hell, I still have some of their phone numbers.)

    I think I would have liked to have gotten drunk with Peter Mitchell, Richard Feynman, and J Harlen Bretz, just off the top of my head.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 15, 2016 4:58 AM GMT
    Michael Faraday. Unlike others, he could have been killed for what he illuminated.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 15, 2016 7:46 AM GMT
    I would have to choose Leonardo da Vinci
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 15, 2016 9:25 AM GMT
    If we're not including the living, first would be Sir Isaac Newton. To be in the presence of sheer genius would make me tremble. Second would be Leonardo da Vinci. His creative mind was all over the place, a wonder to watch operate.

    Third would be Albert Einstein. Not that I could comprehend any of his physics. But rather, I've read he had a silly and mischievous sense of humor, plus loved serious music and played a bit himself. In those things we'd be alike, and might communicate on those levels.
  • Eleven

    Posts: 165

    Aug 15, 2016 3:50 PM GMT
    Einstein, mandelbrot and tesla would make interesting dinner guests, we could all smoke some dmt together
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 15, 2016 3:58 PM GMT
    Dr Michio Kaku! I'd be all like.. "let's leave the simple rhetorical shit for the NBC cameras and get down to business"
  • Corby

    Posts: 78

    Aug 16, 2016 12:35 AM GMT
    Ernest Everett Just

    Jordano Bruno

  • Nov 07, 2016 2:05 AM GMT
    Deffinately Michio Kaku! I used to love his podcasts.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 07, 2016 2:43 AM GMT
    Revisiting this thread after a while, I would include Nicola Tesla in my list (BTW, he didn't create his namesake electric car; it's just named for him by others, 60 years after he died).

    But only if I had tons of money. Because that's what Tesla always lacked, or couldn't hang onto. A genuine genius, who brought us alternating current (AC), that we use throughout the world today.

    Opposing Edison's direct current (DC). Which is still used for parts of our cars, flashlights (British "torches"), and electric chairs to execute US citizens under law. But Edison's DC could never work for long-distance electrical transmission, that lights and powers our world today. It took Tesla's AC.

    Edison was also a genius. But he gets a lot of credit, and his own credit is well-deserved, for things Tesla actually did.

    I'd like to be able to invest in some of Tesla's unfulfilled dreams, but not his wackier ones. Like wireless electric power throughout the entire globe, which the laws of physics, and possibly human health, say aren't practical to this day.

    But still, a neglected and overlooked genius, who often doesn't get enough credit for creating our modern electrified world. It wasn't Edison alone.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 07, 2016 4:52 AM GMT
    Per another recent thread, you all do realize, I hope, that Newton did all of his genius work during the summer when he was 24 years old. After that, he descended into politics, numerology, fruitless alchemy, and by all accounts was quite an asshole.

    Which reminds me to list Robert Hooke. If you don't know him, you should. The original grad student, one might say. A clever farm boy who was hired to do all of the actual experiments for the Royal Society. Because gentlemen couldn't get their hands dirty. Oft rumored to be gay, or possibly just very homely. A lifelong bachelor, in any case. Boyles' experiments on the gas laws? Hooke really did them. Newton hated him, possibly because he actually did some of the work that Isaac took credit for. (Others speculate about angry ex-lovers...) When Hooke died, Newton took over the Royal Society, and had all of Hookes papers and effects burned. Nevertheless, Hooke is credited as one of the fathers of microbiology (first to describe living tissue made of cells), Horology (first to build an accurate watch), and seismology (devised the mathematics that describe earthquakes). Among lots of other stuff.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 07, 2016 5:41 AM GMT
    mindgarden saidPer another recent thread, you all do realize, I hope, that Newton did all of his genius work during the summer when he was 24 years old. After that, he descended into politics, numerology, fruitless alchemy, and by all accounts was quite an asshole.

    Which reminds me to list Robert Hooke. If you don't know him, you should. The original grad student, one might say. A clever farm boy who was hired to do all of the actual experiments for the Royal Society. Because gentlemen couldn't get their hands dirty. Oft rumored to be gay, or possibly just very homely. A lifelong bachelor, in any case. Boyles' experiments on the gas laws? Hooke really did them. Newton hated him, possibly because he actually did some of the work that Isaac took credit for. (Others speculate about angry ex-lovers...) When Hooke died, Newton took over the Royal Society, and had all of Hookes papers and effects burned. Nevertheless, Hooke is credited as one of the fathers of microbiology (first to describe living tissue made of cells), Horology (first to build an accurate watch), and seismology (devised the mathematics that describe earthquakes). Among lots of other stuff.

    I do know about Hooke. But I don't know all about the personalities of these people from the far past. If Newton was an "asshole" then I certainly wouldn't want him as a friend. But I'd still like to know how his mind worked.

    My Mother, whom I truly believe was very smart, as was my Father, always told me to try to associate with people smarter than me.

    She said I would only learn from smarter people. People my own intelligence would only teach me what I already knew. And stupid people would keep me as stupid as them.

    Perhaps a simplification. Because in reality I've learned things from people of all intelligence levels. I've found that everyone can have something of interest to share, perhaps some insight, some viewpoint, that I've never thought of before myself. A thing that has validity.

    I used to say, when people might ask me what I wanted for a Christmas or birthday present, or whatever it was: "I'd most like to have a new idea I haven't thought of before." And I was being truthful, and perhaps at the same time a lame attempt at modesty.

    Because I hate to receive gifts. My job is to give them, not to get them. And not surprisingly, I never did get a new idea as a gift. And after a remark like that, usually no gift at all, either! LOL! Which suited me perfectly.

    But on balance my Mom's advice still guides me. I prefer the company of people smarter than me, assuming they can tolerate me in turn. Just like my Dad, who was insatiably curious and wanted to learn about new things until he died at 84, I want to do the same.

    And one way is by meeting smart people. Even if sometimes, as you claim Newton was, they are assholes. I'll try to filter out the assholiness. I just wanna know what they know, not get into bed with them.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 07, 2016 6:38 AM GMT
    It might have been considered espionage, but it would be fascinating to get Koch, Pasteur, and Lister drunk. Separately or together. These guys were the rock stars of the late 19th century. They were curing the diseases that everybody died from. Their papers were reprinted in The Times (both London and New York) not just in musty science journals. (See: de Kruif, "The Microbe Hunters," 1926. Plus individual biographies.). The only problem was, they hated each other. It didn't help that Koch and Pasteur had fought on opposite sides of a war as young men. At one point, Lister hosted a grand meeting of The Microbe Hunters in London. But they didn't speak each other's languages. Legend has it that the French/German translator was rather inept. Every time that Pasteur mentioned "Our German colleagues," the translator said something like, "Those German Ass-Hats." icon_surprised.gif The Germans stormed out of the meeting. After that, there were no more meetings! Though their students did communicate a bit through back channels. Later, the Egyptian government paid both Koch and Pastuer to come to Egypt and save them from an awful cholera epidemic. (Everybody seems to have forgotten John Snow. Not the one from Game of Thrones - The founder of epidemiology - who had already figured out the source, if not the cause, of cholera.) Koch's theory was correct. Pasteur would not accept it - because it came from Koch - and Pasteur's people started dying from cholera! Why hasn't this been made into a movie?
  • Triggerman

    Posts: 528

    Nov 08, 2016 5:22 PM GMT
    My Dad met Einstein. He was dating the daughter of a University professor at the University of Nebraska when Einstein was visiting for some reason. Probably 1956 He said he was really nice, quiet, just a Midwest dinner. My Dad has an off the chart IQ. 160 measured by Air Force standards. Dad said he was just a really nice guy at dinner.
  • Triggerman

    Posts: 528

    Nov 08, 2016 5:28 PM GMT
    I would rather meet guys that built things. From scratch. Rockefeller, Carnegie, Ford. Guys that did something and not guys that just talked about things. Tesla? Definitely. Gates. sure. Edison was so far ahead. He created ideas and then turned them into things people needed and wanted.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 09, 2016 12:04 PM GMT
    First thought after reading the title was definitely Tesla, it was surprising to see so many other people mention his name as well. I'd like to meet John Hutchison who discovered a form of antigravity with his Tesla coils and his high frequency generators.

    People think John's work is a hoax but if you look deeper into it there's all kinds of scientists doing similar work with zero point energy. Its being discovered that the pyramids work similarly to a Tesla coil. The pyramid in Bosnia had its electromagnetic field imaged and it was giving off an artificial energy signature.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 09, 2016 12:12 PM GMT
    Its all advanced knowledge that the ancients already knew about. The kings chamber of the great pyramid resonates to the note of an f#. Similar to how Tesla's resonator machine caused his whole apartment building to shake in sympathetic resonance, this is probably the same method used to destroy the walls of jericho. In the 70's Buddhist monks were witnessed to have levitated huge stone boulders by chanting and instruments. The boulder was trapped in a standing wave and levitated through sonic acoustic levitation. Bruce Cathie writes about this in his books.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 09, 2016 12:20 PM GMT
    The great pyramid being 1:432,000 the polar diameter of the earth and also in the exact center of all landmass on Earth. Present on an area of land conductive of geomagnetic current meeting land non conductive creating conductive discontinuity, or what people would call a vortex, an intersection of ley-lines where anomalies (to accepted science at least) manifest. These are where pyramids, sacred sites, temples, and even modern churches are found.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 09, 2016 8:00 PM GMT
    Mehran Keshe