Is It OK to Eat Foods Past the ‘Sell By’ Date?

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    Aug 15, 2016 5:11 PM GMT
    NYT: The vast majority of food date labels, including “sell by,” “use by” and “best if used by,” are food manufacturers’ suggestions for peak freshness and taste, rather than indicators of food safety or health concerns. Such labels can be difficult to navigate, though, because the definitions of the terms aren’t standardized, and labeling practices can vary by product type and manufacturer.

    As a general rule, most foods can be consumed days, weeks or even months past the dates printed on packaging.

    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/07/15/ask-well-can-you-eat-foods-past-the-sell-by-date/?
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    Aug 15, 2016 8:24 PM GMT
    I wonder what people used before the advent of "sell by" and "use by" dates? (Clue: sniff, sniff.)



  • ANTiSociaLiNJ...

    Posts: 1117

    Aug 15, 2016 9:47 PM GMT
    I always smell the food first and I've been fine.
  • leanandclean

    Posts: 268

    Aug 15, 2016 9:49 PM GMT
    Ok
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    Aug 16, 2016 12:03 AM GMT
    you looking for permissionicon_rolleyes.gif
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    Aug 16, 2016 1:19 AM GMT
    I always throw it out after the sell by date tbh
  • jock5827

    Posts: 52

    Aug 16, 2016 1:39 AM GMT
    I think that these dates are there to advise consumers and minimize the risk of food-borne illness and lawsuits. There's naturally a bit of leeway, and the sniff and see test never hurts.
  • mwolverine

    Posts: 3381

    Aug 16, 2016 5:19 AM GMT
    For starters, the food should still be good provided you buy it (not consume it) by the sell date.

    Also use some common sense. If it's fresh milk (that at most has a sell date about 2 weeks out), it's not going to last much beyond that.

    On the other hand, dry goods that typically have sell dates that are 2 years out will likely be just fine 2 months after, even more.
  • Dynamo_spark

    Posts: 224

    Aug 16, 2016 7:03 AM GMT
    The 'best before' and 'Sell by' dates are for quility control purposes. All retailers are required by law to regulate their stock. Non-perishable food or items can be placed on special. Perishable items like dairy, meat, poultry or vegetables must be discarded of or sent back to the supplier. Medicines or other medications may not be dispensed or sold if they have past their 'best before' dates.
  • surfin

    Posts: 5

    Aug 16, 2016 7:35 AM GMT
    It depends on the type of product, how much time it has been since the expiry date and the conditions of storage, I'd say. Test before you go at it and you will know it ;)
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    Aug 16, 2016 10:21 AM GMT
    mwolverine saidFor starters, the food should still be good provided you buy it (not consume it) by the sell date.

    Also use some common sense. If it's fresh milk (that at most has a sell date about 2 weeks out), it's not going to last much beyond that.

    On the other hand, dry goods that typically have sell dates that are 2 years out will likely be just fine 2 months after, even more.


    Apparently, at least in California, the fresh milk sell date is 18-days after the cow has been milked, which means by the time the milk makes it into the grocery store which has a high dairy turnover rate the date will be 14 to 15 days out at best. It has been my experience that milk bought early and used slowly will go sour about on the sell date on the bottle, whereas an unopened bottle purchased a couple days before the sell date will last a few days beyond the sell date, but not last for any extended period of time.
  • mwolverine

    Posts: 3381

    Aug 16, 2016 3:19 PM GMT
    In the old country milk used to come in plastic bags.
    Mom would freeze them as they approached the expiration date.