New Food Movement: Native American Indian Cuisine

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    Aug 23, 2016 3:31 AM GMT
    NYT: LAKE TRAVERSE INDIAN RESERVATION, N.D. — The moon was full and the chokecherries were ripe in the southeastern corner of North Dakota. “It’s the one smell that shoots me back to being young,” said Sean Sherman, as the berries boiled under a red-veined froth.

    Mr. Sherman has simmered corn silk with purple bergamot blossoms to make tea, and braised rabbit with spruce tips. He has revived chaga, the fungus that blooms on birch trees, in warm hazelnut milk, and burned juniper branches and corn cobs all the way down to a soft black ash.

    These techniques aren’t borrowed from the cutting-edge kitchens of New York or Copenhagen. Mr. Sherman, a 42-year-old chef who is Oglala Lakota, draws from the knowledge of the Lakota and Ojibwe tribes who farmed and foraged on the plains of the Midwest.

    His work is part of a slowly gathering movement that he and other cooks are calling “new Native American cuisine,” or “indigenous cuisine”.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/17/dining/new-native-american-cuisine.html?
  • HarborFighter

    Posts: 32

    Aug 24, 2016 6:02 AM GMT
    Thank you so much for this. My husband is a chef. He also studied the Native American cultures and languages for many years. He will be very interested in this article. We are going to the US in January, but will only be in the eastern third of the country, from Nashville to DC to Boston. But we will look for this cuisine.
  • 7913p

    Posts: 25

    Aug 24, 2016 10:31 PM GMT
    You should look up Taino Dishes . The Taino Indians were from the Caribbean Island. From Cuba , Haiti, Dominican republic, Puerto Rico, Jamacia . Red Snapper Soup. That is so good. I am a descended from Taino Indains from Cuba.
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    Aug 24, 2016 11:28 PM GMT
    woodsmen said
    NYT: LAKE TRAVERSE INDIAN RESERVATION, N.D. — The moon was full and the chokecherries were ripe in the southeastern corner of North Dakota. “It’s the one smell that shoots me back to being young,” said Sean Sherman, as the berries boiled under a red-veined froth.

    Mr. Sherman has simmered corn silk with purple bergamot blossoms to make tea, and braised rabbit with spruce tips. He has revived chaga, the fungus that blooms on birch trees, in warm hazelnut milk, and burned juniper branches and corn cobs all the way down to a soft black ash.

    These techniques aren’t borrowed from the cutting-edge kitchens of New York or Copenhagen. Mr. Sherman, a 42-year-old chef who is Oglala Lakota, draws from the knowledge of the Lakota and Ojibwe tribes who farmed and foraged on the plains of the Midwest.

    His work is part of a slowly gathering movement that he and other cooks are calling “new Native American cuisine,” or “indigenous cuisine”.

    I've often eaten Lakota food, throughout North and South Dakota. However, despite what the NYT article states, the Lake Traverse Reservation is almost entirely in South Dakota. Unless there's another one unknown to me.

    I especially like the thin corn patties, like what we would call a soft taco in English. I forget the native word for them. All kinds of stuff can go on them, roll them up and so forth as you like. My ex-wife, who is part Indian, would make some of these dishes at home.

    Just a small part Indian, through some French fur trapper ancestor from Winnipeg, Canada who'd come down into the Dakota Territory in the early 1800s and taken a Lakota wife. But my ex liked to stress that connection, though she claimed no tribal affiliation.

    She taught on Indian reservations before I met her. And some of those Lakota foods she cooked were good. Things with bison (buffalo) meat could be especially tasty, by then being grazed in North Dakota like cattle. "Bison burgers" aren't bad, but I prefer it shredded for a kind of "sloppy joe's" with a tangy BBQ sauce.
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    Aug 25, 2016 3:05 AM GMT
    I would LOVE to try this!