Is it racist for a mixed person to identify as the race that they feel the most connected to?

  • Joshthegaymer

    Posts: 91

    Aug 23, 2016 4:25 AM GMT
    I only ask this question because I am multi-racial, yet I identify with being white due to the fact that I was raised among white people. As a multi-racial person, I often get considered as being apart of a certain race which I don't feel any connection to in terms of my identity. Do other people with a mixed, biracial, or multi-racial background suffer from this type of thing? So does me identifying with being white make me racist? icon_sad.gif I do apologize if my question offended anyone.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 23, 2016 5:07 AM GMT
    I don't know if quite the same thing, but my late partner was half Italian and half German. He expressed the Italian side, especially with his cooking. He wanted to be an Italian like his late father, and that's what he was.

    My grandmother was half Irish, and half Dutch. Her husband was also part Dutch, with some French (although his last name, and therefore her married name, was French). She identified herself as Irish.

    As a kid I'd get dragged along to all these Irish family gatherings, be marched in St. Patrick's Day parades, sit beside my grandmother on the piano bench and be expected to sing all these Irish ballades along with her. I began to think I was Irish, but in reality only an eighth?

    So maybe these identities are what we make them. Or think they are.

    And today I merely think I'm **ME**. And whatever I am, a true mutt of many nationalities, a Heinz 57 as my husband calls me (after their "57 Varieties"), is apparently OK, because I'm happy with who I am. My heritage, which is interesting and that I respect, does not define me. Rather, I define myself.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 23, 2016 10:56 AM GMT
    I was adopted and was raised in a white family. I think if I was your doctor I would raise my eyebrows if you checked off white, based on your appearance...

    Several times people have asked me if I consider myself white.

    It was always difficult, because I didn't identify with any aspects of being Asian--other than my appearance. In time I came to realize most of society views me as Asian and sometimes ethnicity will play a role in things doctors will look for etc.

    To paraphrase Art_Deco,

    At the end of the day I think I am just **ME**.
  • orome

    Posts: 30

    Aug 23, 2016 12:08 PM GMT
    Joshthegaymer saidI only ask this question because I am multi-racial, yet I identify with being white due to the fact that I was raised among white people. As a multi-racial person, I often get considered as being apart of a certain race which I don't feel any connection to in terms of my identity. Do other people with a mixed, biracial, or multi-racial background suffer from this type of thing? So does me identifying with being white make me racist? icon_sad.gif I do apologize if my question offended anyone.


    Racist? No, although I would question where this comes from. Specifically, why you weren't informed and involved with the other parts of your ethnicity regularly.

    It is, however problematic in that there is a part of you that you've given up rather than try to understand.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 23, 2016 12:38 PM GMT
    Well, there is so much emphasis on race (for good and for bad reasons) in this country that I definitely understand how you might be conflicted or want to choose and commit to just one at this stage in your life. My cousins are biracial/multiracial and they each handled this differently. But as Orome stated above, it feels like underneath it all, you're running away from a part of you instead of trying to fully explore that side to understand for yourself and even educate others. You can't be in a place of power when you're running away from yourself. And to be honest, you don't really have the looks that people normally would assume was "white" so I'm not sure calling yourself only white gives you as much acceptance as you think it does. But there's absolutely nothing wrong with feeling like you're more connected to certain interests, behaviors, gatherings that happen to be common amongst a particular group. Good luck!
  • smegnificient

    Posts: 265

    Aug 23, 2016 2:54 PM GMT
    Hell will freeze over before a mixed gay guy identifies more with his non-white side lol
  • FitBlackCuddl...

    Posts: 802

    Aug 23, 2016 10:33 PM GMT
    Joshthegaymer saidI only ask this question because I am multi-racial, yet I identify with being white due to the fact that I was raised among white people. As a multi-racial person, I often get considered as being apart of a certain race which I don't feel any connection to in terms of my identity. Do other people with a mixed, biracial, or multi-racial background suffer from this type of thing? So does me identifying with being white make me racist? icon_sad.gif I do apologize if my question offended anyone.


    Only if you feel/think other racial groups are of LESS VALUE than you and yours.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 23, 2016 10:57 PM GMT
    smegnificient said
    Hell will freeze over before a mixed gay guy identifies more with his non-white side lol

    Sorry to disappoint you, but I know several gay guys who stress their non-White heritage, over their White mix.

    You can be who you want to be, if you have some plausible claim to a heritage. My wish is that eventually, now that we're becoming a global universal race with distance and geographical barriers falling, our skin color and racial differences will dissolve away. Humans will become ONE race. Indistinguishable one from another.

    I appreciate preserving the history and traditions, and we can also do that. But I want us to become a universal human race. It'll take more generations than I'll be able to see, but that remains my dream.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 23, 2016 11:55 PM GMT
    This issue of race identification was enshrined in US State laws, mainly Southern States, needless to say. And used to enforce anti-miscegenation laws, that prohibited interracial marriage. Someone with even a distant Black ancestor could not legally marry a White.

    This concept became a plot element in the classic American Broadway musical "Showboat", portraying life in the late 1800s US South.

    Two of the principle characters engage in a mixed marriage, and are about to be arrested for miscegenation. The White husband takes a knife, and nicks his own wrist, and his part-Black's wife's wrist as well. He rubs their blood together.

    Paraphrasing now from memory, he says to the Sheriff: "If I have a drop of Negro blood in me, that also makes me a Negro, too." The Sheriff concedes the legal point. "Then you can't arrest us, because we are both Negroes." They go free.

    An astonishing moment in American theatre for the 1920s. The rest of the musical does contain a lot of Black stereotypes we might wince at today, but then it's also portraying the way things really were in the 1800s South. Providing both entertainment and a lesson on many levels. And exposing racism like it had never been done before, and the whole concept of race identity.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 24, 2016 12:28 AM GMT
    This subject was already addressed in 1979.

    I was born a poor black child: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qtmi4Nc-3dE
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 24, 2016 1:14 AM GMT
    eagermuscle saidThis subject was already addressed in 1979.

    I was born a poor black child: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qtmi4Nc-3dE

    That Steve Martin movie is remarkable on several levels. A poor Black family shelters and loves a mentally challenged White person. As innocent & naive as a new-born baby, he doesn't have a clue what anything is really about. He's sort of a Forrest Gump precursor.

    He stumbles into success & failure, love & heartbreak. Not so much a jerk as a simpleton adrift on the tides of life. Big heart, small brain.

    BTW, I've run into Steve Martin at art museums. He's rather intellectual, and a notable art connoisseur & collector. No jerk or small brain is the real Martin.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 24, 2016 5:23 AM GMT
    UMayNeverKnow said
    Art_Deco said
    smegnificient said
    Hell will freeze over before a mixed gay guy identifies more with his non-white side lol
    ...

    I appreciate preserving the history and traditions, and we can also do that. But I want us to become a universal human race. It'll take more generations than I'll be able to see, but that remains my dream.

    Boring uniformity, but then again you were career military. I hope your vision for humanity's future never happens.

    Racial differences bring struggles for supremacy, and discrimination. Perhaps when we all look alike, we'll all treat each other alike. Yet still expressing personal individuality, just not being judged by skin color or other racial features. I would consider that a great improvement over what we have today.
  • Joshthegaymer

    Posts: 91

    Aug 24, 2016 5:34 AM GMT
    orome said
    Joshthegaymer saidI only ask this question because I am multi-racial, yet I identify with being white due to the fact that I was raised among white people. As a multi-racial person, I often get considered as being apart of a certain race which I don't feel any connection to in terms of my identity. Do other people with a mixed, biracial, or multi-racial background suffer from this type of thing? So does me identifying with being white make me racist? icon_sad.gif I do apologize if my question offended anyone.


    Racist? No, although I would question where this comes from. Specifically, why you weren't informed and involved with the other parts of your ethnicity regularly.

    It is, however problematic in that there is a part of you that you've given up rather than try to understand.


    To answer your question, my biological father doesn't want anything to do with me and the feeling is mutual because he is a schmuck. Being that I was raised in and still live in a community where there is barely any other communities that is are either white or Hispanic (which is the other main ethnic community in my hometown), I felt more involved in the white community. When I was a small child, I didn't really fit in let alone assimilate into the community of my biological father because I didn't really talk to many people until I moved out to my hometown with my family. I know this may sound confusing, so if you would like for me to explain it better in a private message, I can.

    Here is a link that shows the different ethnic groups that live in and around my hometown:
    http://www.city-data.com/city/Byers-Colorado.html
  • Joshthegaymer

    Posts: 91

    Aug 24, 2016 5:38 AM GMT
    FitBlackCuddler said
    Joshthegaymer saidI only ask this question because I am multi-racial, yet I identify with being white due to the fact that I was raised among white people. As a multi-racial person, I often get considered as being apart of a certain race which I don't feel any connection to in terms of my identity. Do other people with a mixed, biracial, or multi-racial background suffer from this type of thing? So does me identifying with being white make me racist? icon_sad.gif I do apologize if my question offended anyone.


    Only if you feel/think other racial groups are of LESS VALUE than you and yours.


    I believe that all people are created equal regardless of their race, their religion, their sexual orientation, their gender, etc. When it comes to how I personally identify myself in terms of my ethnicity, I mainly look at the environment and community that I grew up in. I know it sounds a little confusing :/
  • ANTiSociaLiNJ...

    Posts: 1145

    Aug 24, 2016 7:34 AM GMT
    I don't think you should go around telling people you identify as white. Just tell people you are multiracial.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 24, 2016 8:00 AM GMT
    smegnificient saidHell will freeze over before a mixed gay guy identifies more with his non-white side lol


    That's not all the way true. I met plenty of mixed raced guys, more recently since I moved to Tennessee....who identify more with their Black side.

    It goes like this: mixed kids in the white suburbs tend to identify as white. Mixed kids in the city or influenced around their ethnic side tend to identify with that.

    I see it like this. I never understood why Obama was called the first Black president. Never, one bit. Except, he did marry a Sista so that was the first Black First Lady. But, you don't call a Labrador and Poodle mix a poodle or a Labrador. You don't mix Blue and Yellow and call it blue, mother fuckers. You call it green.
  • monstapex

    Posts: 478

    Aug 24, 2016 10:14 PM GMT
    This is what happens when a mixed person tries to pass as white:

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 25, 2016 1:35 AM GMT
    monstapex saidThis is what happens...:

    I don't blame him; nobody likes a nagger. Even her mother was one! He did the right thing, just walk away from that mess.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 25, 2016 2:15 AM GMT
    ANTiSociaLiNJUSTICeWarior said
    I don't think you should go around telling people you identify as white. Just tell people you are multiracial.

    It's every man's own choice how he identifies himself. I used to sometimes say Irish, or Dutch, or Czech. The other nationalities were too insignificant an amount in me. And I realize that's not racial, but a similar situation.

    Nowadays I just say Northern European, a mutt, a Heinz 57 as my husband calls me. And I kinda like that. Because I kinda like me. Not great, not famous, but good at what I've done.

    And if my mix produced me, then it musta been OK. Versus the view that unless you've got famous ancestors, and a prestigious family, a dignified name, you can't be worth very much, and can't be expected to amount to anything. I reverse that. I made myself a success. Giving my ancestors some grateful retroactive credit for the genes I inherited.

    I know, some convoluted thinking. But I won't be constrained by traditional concepts of personal worth and social standing.

    My Mother always said the smartest and sturdiest dogs were mixed breeds. The weakest and shortest lived, she claimed, prone to all kinds of problems, were the pure-breds. Choose a mutt, she told me. And that's what I am.
  • Joshthegaymer

    Posts: 91

    Aug 26, 2016 12:10 AM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal said
    monstapex saidThis is what happens...:

    I don't blame him; nobody likes a nagger. Even her mother was one! He did the right thing, just walk away from that mess.


    The guy didn't have to smack the woman around though :/
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 26, 2016 2:39 PM GMT
    caitlyn-jenner.jpg

    If this is what can pass for a woman these days, you can certainly pass for white. Sky's the limit. I think you could totally pass as an Italian immigrant. Just work on the accent.

  • JackNNJ

    Posts: 1051

    Aug 26, 2016 2:46 PM GMT
    Yes it's racist because everything is racist and not being racist is racist and getting up the morning is racist and going to work is racist and masturbating is racist and flossing and eating and breathing are all racist, because racist and racist. Racist is racist because it's racist racist is racist and racist racist racist also racist with racist and racist. Racist, because racist.

    thats-racist.gif
  • JackNNJ

    Posts: 1051

    Aug 26, 2016 2:47 PM GMT
    UMayNeverKnow said
    Art_Deco saidThis issue of race identification was enshrined in US State laws, mainly Southern States, needless to say. And used to enforce anti-miscegenation laws, that prohibited interracial marriage. Someone with even a distant Black ancestor could not legally marry a White.

    This concept became a plot element in the classic American Broadway musical "Showboat", portraying life in the late 1800s US South.

    Two of the principle characters engage in a mixed marriage, and are about to be arrested for miscegenation. The White husband takes a knife, and nicks his own wrist, and his part-Black's wife's wrist as well. He rubs their blood together.

    Paraphrasing now from memory, he says to the Sheriff: "If I have a drop of Negro blood in me, that also makes me a Negro, too." The Sheriff concedes the legal point. "Then you can't arrest us, because we are both Negroes." They go free.

    An astonishing moment in American theatre for the 1920s. The rest of the musical does contain a lot of Black stereotypes we might wince at today, but then it's also portraying the way things really were in the 1800s South. Providing both entertainment and a lesson on many levels. And exposing racism like it had never been done before, and the whole concept of race identity.


    There was a woman who worked in Vital Statistics in the New Orleans City Hall back in the 1950s when my mother worked there. It was either her job or she took it upon herself to monitor such things as which families were considered black. I remember my mother telling me years later when I was an adult that one of our neighbor's maiden names was considered black. I never would have suspected it.


    How many quadroons did she identify?
  • Joshthegaymer

    Posts: 91

    Aug 26, 2016 3:17 PM GMT
    CODY4U saidcaitlyn-jenner.jpg

    If this is what can pass for a woman these days, you can certainly pass for white. Sky's the limit. I think you could totally pass as an Italian immigrant. Just work on the accent.



    Haha it's funny that you should mention the Italian thing. I am a fourth Italian icon_smile.gif
  • mcbrion

    Posts: 305

    Aug 27, 2016 9:28 PM GMT
    smegnificient saidHell will freeze over before a mixed gay guy identifies more with his non-white side lol


    I guess Hell Froze Over, then. Most of my cousins, who are fair skinned enough to pass for White (since they ARE half-White), don't identify with the "White" side at all. And the purely White side of the family doesn't identify with being White, since they're married to Indian or Black relatives.

    Where do you get these ideas? Not from actual knowledge, that much is certain.