Can High-Intensity Exercise Help Me Lose Weight?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 28, 2016 3:51 AM GMT
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    NYT: “1 Minute of All-Out Exercise May Equal 45 Minutes of Moderate Exertion,” for instance, three months of high-intensity interval training practiced three times per week led to approximately the same improvements in aerobic endurance, insulin resistance and muscular health as far longer sessions of moderate pedaling on a stationary bicycle.

    One type of workout was not more beneficial than the other, in other words, but one required much, much less time.

    The upshot of the available science is that if you currently have the time and inclination to complete long-ish, moderate workouts — if you enjoy running, cycling, swimming, walking or rowing for 30 minutes or more, for instance — by all means, continue.

    If, on the other hand, you frequently skip workouts because you feel that you do not have enough time to exercise, then very brief, high-intensity intervals may be ideal for you. They can robustly improve health and fitness without overcrowding schedules.

    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/05/11/can-high-intensity-exercise-help-me-lose-weight-and-other-questions-answered/?
  • leanandclean

    Posts: 281

    Aug 28, 2016 12:35 PM GMT
    I'm a huge fan of high-intensity workouts! And yes they can help you lose weight. But I recommend skepticism towards the claim that one minute of working out in this mode is as good as 45 minutes of working out in another. Exercise science is like any other - full of claims that are later disproven, or simplified and hyped by media trying to please their consumers. (See also: medical science.)
  • bro4bro

    Posts: 1037

    Aug 28, 2016 5:50 PM GMT
    I have a friend who swears that jogging a given distance (3 miles, for instance) at a slow pace burns just as many calories as running hard for the same distance. It just takes longer. He claims various studies support this.

    As a scientist and a competitive runner, I call bullshit.

    The human body is a mechanical system fueled by electrochemical reactions. With every mechanical, electrical, or chemical system there is a linear region where the amount of energy you get out is proportional to the amount you put in, but eventually you reach a point of diminishing returns, where it takes more and more input to attain an incremental increase in output. So, when you overdrive your body, you have to burn more calories to perform the same amount of net work. Running 3 miles at top speed really does take more energy than jogging 3 miles at a slow pace.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 29, 2016 12:35 AM GMT
    Have you ever noticed that you don't want to eat a lot of food before you run?
    Or after a run, do you usually feel like eating light rather than a heavy meal?

    I encourage my friends who want to drop fat to run twice a day.
    Instead of one 3 mile run, they run twice for 1.5 miles.

    It works. It also reminds them more than once a day of their goals.

    I see too many people torture themselves once a day and then spend the rest of their time eating like pigs, and getting fatter.
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    Sep 20, 2016 11:10 PM GMT
    I've said it a million times: fat loss is MUCH more about nutrition than about exercise. If you're eating an excess of calories most days, no amount of cardio--high intensity or low--will negate that.
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    Oct 10, 2016 11:43 PM GMT
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    NYT: “1 Minute of All-Out Exercise May Equal 45 Minutes of Moderate Exertion,” for instance, three months of high-intensity interval training practiced three times per week led to approximately the same improvements in aerobic endurance, insulin resistance and muscular health as far longer sessions of moderate pedaling on a stationary bicycle.

    One type of workout was not more beneficial than the other, in other words, but one required much, much less time.

    The upshot of the available science is that if you currently have the time and inclination to complete long-ish, moderate workouts — if you enjoy running, cycling, swimming, walking or rowing for 30 minutes or more, for instance — by all means, continue.

    If, on the other hand, you frequently skip workouts because you feel that you do not have enough time to exercise, then very brief, high-intensity intervals may be ideal for you. They can robustly improve health and fitness without overcrowding schedules.

    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/05/11/can-high-intensity-exercise-help-me-lose-weight-and-other-questions-answered/?


    All that matters is the distance. Studies show that if you run a 5k in 45 or walk a 5k in an hour and a half, either of those burns the same number of calories. All that matters is calories: if you have a surplus, you will gain fat, if you have a deficit you will lose fat.
  • Noeton

    Posts: 208

    Oct 13, 2016 2:54 PM GMT
    jackedgamer saidI've said it a million times: fat loss is MUCH more about nutrition than about exercise. If you're eating an excess of calories most days, no amount of cardio--high intensity or low--will negate that.


    I'd say exactly the same. But I'll add that not all calories are equal, i.e. moderate carbs and make sure whatever you are eating is satisfying so you can stick to it. Make sure you are hydrated! Under these circumstances, high intensity cardio will help you lose fat. But, in my opinion, it is optimal to combine low intensity and high intensity cardio. The high intensity cardio can help you continue to burn fat after exercise. Good luck!