BIKER GUYS! Tell us about your motorcycles, the ones you liked, any you hated

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 12, 2009 4:18 PM GMT
    I'll start with just the 750cc street bikes I've had:

    1973 2-stroke, 3-cylinder Suzuki, aka the "Water Buffalo" for being the first water-cooled production bike sold in the US. Bought it new in Georgia, rode it down to the Florida Keys, then up to New York. Sold it in less than 2 years. Good engine, crappy suspension, typical of big Japanese bikes of that time. And the 3 separate ignition breaker points were a bear to adjust for proper engine timing, not to mention the 3 carbs that were operated by a cable "spool" and almost impossible to sync well.

    1993 Honda CB750. As bullet-proof as my previous Hondas, one of only 2 bikes I ever kept as long as 3 years. It aged well, and there simply wasn't anything else I wanted to own more. Only sold it because my docs said my back couldn't tolerate motorcycling. Less than a year later I was riding again on something else. I was amused that Honda was marketing this latest CB750 as an entry-level bike, because the original 750 in 1969 had been considered a Superbike, and this one was just as quick. Showed how far the bar had been raised.

    2001 Kawasaki ZR7. My first Kawasaki, a 4-cylinder, air-cooled "standard" like the CB750. And the first motor vehicle in my life, including cars, trucks, motorcycles, and snowmobile, that had absolutely ZERO things go wrong with it in 15,000 miles. Not a loose bolt, not a bad switch, not a broken or faulty anything. Even rode it to Sturgis in 2001, before I replaced it with a bigger 2002 Kawi sport tourer, so I could ride longer distances. A bike that was equally flawless. And took me 3000 miles round-trip to Houston, Texas that same year, to visit the guy who became my first partner.

    I'll keep my surprising choice for worst, most hated bike for another post. And what are your bikes?
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    Feb 12, 2009 5:41 PM GMT
    Started riding various dirt bikes as a kid then into my teens. My old KX 125 was my favorite.

    Bought my first Harley-Davidson in 1997. It was a 1200 Custom Sportster. Loved it but decided I wanted something rubber mounted to keep me from from being shook to hell and back. Latest ride is a 2006 Harley-Davidson Street Bob in denim black. (pic in profile). Runs like a champ.

    My partner of 13 years rides a 2004 Sportster 883 Custom. We have been riding all over the East and hope to make it out West at some point. We ride alone most the time but have a local group of gays and lesbians to ride with at times.

    I am not a Harley snob. I will ride with anyone with two wheels that wants to ride.
    Keep the rubber side down!
  • Gloryboys

    Posts: 28

    Feb 12, 2009 5:54 PM GMT
    Hi been riding for 27 years. First bike Honda SS50 then Honda 250 Super dream , CX500, 750 Intercepter, 1000 Hurricane, Blackbird and now on my second Suzuki RF900. Really want one of them new Hayabusa's after taest riding one but still too expensive, Oh well some day.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 12, 2009 6:11 PM GMT
    Got my first Harley in late September, 1970, a 1971 FLH 1200cc. I had special-ordered it in July, and it was kinda unique, more for what it didn't have than what it did have.

    Unlike other Electra Glides of that period, it had no whitewall tires, no fender bumpers, no chrome crash guards surrounding the saddle bags (in fact it initially had no bags at all), no luggage rack over the rear fender, no fat 2-tone Buddy Seat, and no windshield.

    It's seat was a solo black leather "tractor" saddle, like some rider lawn mowers have today, also called a motorcycle cop's saddle, the seat post fully sprung in the frame used then. And the thing only cost me $2300, unheard of for a Big Twin even back then. Later I did add Harley's black fiberglass saddlebags and a windshield, so that it looked almost identical to today's Road King model, except for that 1930s-style saddle.

    But when "stripped" as I initially rode it, the overall impression was of a vintage Harley, since Harley has always retained classic styling elements in its bikes, even if buried under layers of chrome and accessories. So that car drivers would call to me in traffic, to ask if it was a 1935 model, or a restored Indian, or some other classic bike. And I loved it.

    The bike served me well, if not really competent in the functional things a bike is supposed to do, like handle, brake and accelerate. I used to say it was like riding half of a 1952 Chevy pickup truck.

    But it's the one bike that always made me smile when I rode it. I don't know if it was that classic Harley rumble, or the engine shake, or some other indefinable element. It simply pleased me to ride it.

    Sold it after 2 years, when it was starting to feel saggy & worn-out, and I rarely keep a bike more than a year or two anyway. Always looking for something newer. But that Harley remains just about my favorite bike, the one that always made me feel good on it. icon_biggrin.gif
  • qalbi30

    Posts: 116

    Feb 12, 2009 6:47 PM GMT
    Living in the U.K.started with a B.S.A Bantam and loved the freedom that it gave me,then progressed to a 650 Panther which also was great fun except it used to spray hot oil from the rocker box so on journeys down to the coast used to ride with my legs spread apart,good practice for events later on in the evening.

    Before retirement used to commute on a Kawarsaki Z 650 in full leathers,pale blue of course!,and always felt safe in any part of the city,London can be a strange place to be in late at night but nobody knew that it was a"sheep in wolves clothing"

    Now still happily riding a Dalim (with a Honda 125 motor) ideal for this warm climate,and hope to continue till my dotage !icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 12, 2009 7:25 PM GMT
    OK, here's the story about my worst bike: 1975 BMW R90/6, a 900cc boxer. At $3200 USD new in 1975 it was my most expensive bike to date, and given the BMW reputation for high quality, I had great expectations.

    I put German Krauser saddlebags on it, custom made and beautifully molded to closely hug the rear shock absorbers. Rectangular, spacious, and quickly detachable, we used to joke they were like Samsonite hard luggage when you carried them into your hotel room.

    BMW didn’t have a factory touring fairing in the US back then, so I ordered a Vetter Windjammer III, with matching lowers designed especially for the BMW’s protruding horizontal cylinders. It was black like the bike, and I specified white pinstriping from the factory, to match that on the Beemer.

    It was a stunning bike, at that point valued at $4000, commonly thought to be the finest long-distance tourer on the road at that time as I had outfitted it. Today it would be classified as a sport tourer.

    And the suspension was glorious. You didn’t realize how competent it was until you got over 80 mph, and felt how wonderfully compliant yet composed it was. Clearly optimized for storming the autobahn, and vastly superior to any of my previous bikes.

    But the engine and other components… ah. It quickly blew out the engine's rear main crank seal, the fairly new 900cc engine variant being derived from the earlier 750, its crankcase breather valve not redesigned for the greater pressure of the larger pistons. I blew out 5 rear seals in 9 months, all replaced under warranty, but a hassle I didn’t appreciate having.

    The Varta battery went bad, the saddle foam compressed down to a rock-hard slab, and the centerstand springs kept breaking, unexpectedly dropping the stand down onto the road while I’d be riding.

    I traded it after about 10 months and 17,000 miles for a new 1976 Honda GoldWing, then in its second year of production. I’ve never owned a BMW since, and doubt I ever will.
  • zakariahzol

    Posts: 2241

    Feb 13, 2009 11:27 AM GMT
    I have two motorbike. One a Malaysian make 120cc Kriss that I use for commuting to work and also for riding short distance . My second bike is a 180cc JAGUH Malaysian make also. Jaguh is actually a copycat of Kawasaki Vulcan and Thai make 190cc Phantom. It is produce by Malaysian Goverment for it citizen who wish to own bigger cc motor at cheaper cost. Malaysia have a strict protection policy , so all luxury good have high import taxes so those bike like Harley are out of reach for most Malaysian. This motor bike is the one I use to go biking all over the country and hopefully one day neighbouring Thailand. Putting it side by side it look just like Harley eventhough for most experience biker will notice the different immediately.

    Both my motorbike are very economical and require little gasoline which is perfect because I prefer riding motorcycle over my car. Both motorbike have given me so much pleasure, fun and adventure and I just love them.

    I use to own a Rxz Yamaha but find not as economical, require changes of lubrication (2 t oil) often and I ended selling it. Even the seat kinda narrow and not cormfortable for long distance riding.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 13, 2009 5:18 PM GMT
    streetbobfx saidStarted riding various dirt bikes as a kid then into my teens. My old KX 125 was my favorite.

    Bought my first Harley-Davidson in 1997. It was a 1200 Custom Sportster. Loved it but decided I wanted something rubber mounted to keep me from from being shook to hell and back. Latest ride is a 2006 Harley-Davidson Street Bob in denim black. (pic in profile). Runs like a champ.

    My partner of 13 years rides a 2004 Sportster 883 Custom. We have been riding all over the East and hope to make it out West at some point. We ride alone most the time but have a local group of gays and lesbians to ride with at times.

    I am not a Harley snob. I will ride with anyone with two wheels that wants to ride.
    Keep the rubber side down!
    nice hog.
    I've been looking at the new harley nightsters and decided that's what I'm getting myself as a congratulatory present after I get my nursing degree.

    there are a few guys selling some on craigslist and goddamn are they mean looking.

    I want one murdered out (flat black) with drag bars. *drools*
    nightster_april_08_DSC_0082_900.sized.jp


    if you'll excuse me, I have to change my pants now.

    we also for the longest time, had a '71 triumph bonneville that my father and I were going to put back together. It sat in his workshed for years, primed and parted. He finally decided he wasn't going to put it back otgether and sold it on craigslist to this guy for 500 bucks (what he paid for it originally) that guy sent us some pictures of it after he restored it and I wanted to die. icon_sad.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 13, 2009 5:30 PM GMT
    oh shit.

    nightser trike.


    not bad looking.

    http://houston.craigslist.org/mcy/1030189174.html
    3n23kb3m0ZZZZZZZZZ92ba05c41b9edbf1b1b.jp
    3n23kc3o7ZZZZZZZZZ92bd634ed1f87181f5b.jp
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 13, 2009 8:35 PM GMT
    Funkapottomous, thanks for the compliment on my ride. That pic is last year. I recently put on knurled chrome hand and foot controls.

    FYI...you will like the new 2009 Sportster 883 Iron. It just came out. Go ahead! Reward yourself. You deserve it.

    http://harley-davidson.motorcycle-buyers-guide.com/2009-xl883n-sportster-iron-883/
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 13, 2009 9:10 PM GMT
    In the mid-80s, for one summer, I rode a beater 125cc Yamaha that was basically a dirt bike with just enough lights and stuff to be street legal. It then sat in the garage until I gave it away a few years later. I haven't been on a motorcycle since then.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14336

    Feb 14, 2009 6:15 PM GMT
    I always wanted to learn how to drive a motorcycle but could not find anyone willing to teach me how so I never bothered spending the money on a motorcycle learners permit. I always admired and respected motorcyclists. You guys are great and you are much more considerate of others on the road than several motorists. I always wanted a sport bike like a Ninja. But Harley-Davidsons are also very cool as well. Lets face facts, motorcycles are a lot cheaper to own and operate than cars plus they are easier on fuel and the environment. A hot guy on a motorcycle wearing black leather and tight jeans is definitely a very beautiful sight on the roads and highways of America.
  • zakariahzol

    Posts: 2241

    Feb 15, 2009 7:47 AM GMT
    ROADBIKEROAD,

    You mean there no driving school for riding motorbike in USA. That kinda strange. Riding motor bike is like riding bicycle , without paddling. You learn to balance it, place the clutch like car, brake, learn the road signal and respect the law. Your are all set. Bike admirer like you should give it a try. It promise a life of adventure and fun at fraction of cost driving a car.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 15, 2009 8:47 AM GMT
    roadbikeRob saidI always wanted to learn how to drive a motorcycle but could not find anyone willing to teach me how so I never bothered spending the money on a motorcycle learners permit. I always admired and respected motorcyclists. You guys are great and you are much more considerate of others on the road than several motorists. I always wanted a sport bike like a Ninja. But Harley-Davidsons are also very cool as well. Lets face facts, motorcycles are a lot cheaper to own and operate than cars plus they are easier on fuel and the environment. A hot guy on a motorcycle wearing black leather and tight jeans is definitely a very beautiful sight on the roads and highways of America.

    Check your local community colleges. You're very likely to find an MSF beginners course. That's how I got my license. They provide the motorcycles, helmet, and gloves. However, I would recommend bringing your own helmet and gloves. The ones I got were kinda old and ripe. icon_lol.gif

    There's two parts to the course.. 1) classroom, 2) riding test in a parking lot. I don't know what the motorcycle license requirements are for NY. But in CA, if you pass the MSF course, you don't have to take the parking lot test at the DMV. All you have to do is take the written test and take a new picture. No need for a learners permit.

    I was a little intimidated when I took the MSF course. I thought I would fall or drop the bike. But it was pretty easy. Basically, if you know how to ride a bicycle and you know how to drive a stick shift car, you've got nothing to worry about because you've already got the balance and coordination aspect down.

    Check the MSF website for more details..

    http://nm.msf-usa.org/msf/ridercourses.aspx?state=NY
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 27, 2009 6:08 PM GMT
    Kinda old news, but in case you guys didn't know. Harley killed off their Buell division, and dealers are blowing away the inventory. Get one while you can! icon_biggrin.gif

    http://hellforleathermagazine.com/2009/10/harley-paying-dealers-5000-for.html

    Harley-Davidson is paying dealers a $5,000 per-bike incentive for each new Buell they sell, irrespective of model.
    ...
    The $5,000 incentive helps explain the fire sale prices we've seen on Buells in the last five days -- as low as $4,999 for zero-mile Buell 1125CRs
  • Scotticvs

    Posts: 10

    Jun 22, 2016 9:15 AM GMT
    I just got my first bike ever the other week, after I got my endorsement last month. It's a 2014 Kawasaki Ninja 300 ABS, got it new for a great deal. I'm told I'll probably outgrow it in a few months, but I think I'll enjoy it for quite some time. It looks super awesome. Breaking it in now, I love it, it was either this or I was debating like a Honda CBR500R. But I was told by the dealer that the Honda bikes just aren't quite as exciting. I'm glad I picked this bike to start. It handles very well and I'm loving it so far. I guess my only lament really is just having to shift gears a lot for want of a more powerful engine. It'll do.

    kawasaki-ninja-300-abs-se-2014-3.jpg
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 22, 2016 10:12 PM GMT
    i had a two gixxers and a R1. Sold everything off two years ago.
    All these bikes were like toasters; fill with gas and apply 12 volts. Totally reliable.