Do You Use a Hammock?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 30, 2016 12:31 AM GMT
    06HAMMOCK-master768.jpg

    NYT: Once you get used to having one around, a hammock isn’t so much a design option as a necessity. It practically imposes a different rhythm on your life. You walk into a room and see it hanging there, and it’s hard not to fall into it, even for just a few minutes. And once you’re there, suspended, swaying, the process is automatic: Cares evaporate.

    I read in it. I nap in it. I text in it. I lie in it while talking to my children or they lie in theirs while talking to me. I don’t sleep in it overnight but I do lie in it sometimes during bouts of insomnia.

    The word “hammock” comes to us through Spanish from the Taino Indians, who lived on several islands in the Caribbean at the time of the first European contact, including Hispaniola, Cuba, Puerto Rico and Jamaica. Hammocks were among the curiosities that Columbus took back to Spain

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/06/style/hammocks-venezuela-indoors.html?
  • Nakedman1969

    Posts: 247

    Sep 30, 2016 10:09 PM GMT
    I would like to try one.
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    Sep 30, 2016 10:17 PM GMT
    I'm not a good "back sleeper" so a hammock doesn't suit me. My family had a summer yard one I used 60+ years ago, so the concept's not alien to me. But you can't move around on it, that I like to do when reclining. You're kinda fixed in place.

    Very nice for other people, an American warm weather backyard icon, but not for me.
  • DannyLugo

    Posts: 59

    Oct 01, 2016 2:39 AM GMT
    Totally agree wit U!
    My mom would use it 2 send my bro 2 Ialaland:-)
    Workz just as great 2 put kids 2 sleep as children's Motrin...lol.icon_razz.gificon_razz.gif
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    Oct 01, 2016 6:50 AM GMT
    Gota love just laying back in there and gently swaying. I did most of my studying for exams while laying back in there. I wouldn't sleep in mine becuse A: it's in the basement (great to use during the winter icon_razz.gif ) and B: As of now, under the hammock is cement -_-. No grass, dirt, sand, or rug. icon_redface.gif
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    Oct 01, 2016 11:55 AM GMT
    yes I have one South American hammock.

    where I like to lay down and read my books. how else am i supposed to relax?

  • JackNNJ

    Posts: 1051

    Oct 01, 2016 12:15 PM GMT
    bikni+speedo+thong2+7-10-2012-762870.jpe

    BANANA HAMMOCK
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    Oct 01, 2016 1:09 PM GMT
    Europeans evidently had never thought of the hammock until the first explorers encountered native populations using them. It was quickly realized hammocks could have advantages on sailing vessels.

    Lighter & cheaper than the wooden berths previously in use, and more compact than laying padded palettes on the decks, that might also get wet in foul weather. They also could isolate the sleeper from some of the sickening rolling motion of the small wooden ships.

    On warships hammocks allowed more guns to be installed on lower decks. Sailors would sleep directly over the guns, and could quickly take the hammocks down to stow compactly when the orders to "Clear the decks!" and "Man the guns!" were given.

    So that the humble hammock was actually responsible for an evolution in naval architecture. And was a factor in allowing more powerful and lethal warships, capable of carrying more firepower than previously, with larger crews. Admiral Lord Nelson's flagship HMS Victory had 104 guns and a ship's compliment of approx. 850.

    Perhaps because of the class distinction between ordinary sailors, versus naval officers who tended mostly to still sleep in wooden berths, the hammock doesn't seem to have become as popular for British civilians over the years, the way it did in the United States.

    Maybe it's also our backyard BBQ culture, and generally warmer summers. I hope Ex_Mil8 will give us a better British perspective on this than I can. I know our family always had one in the backyard during my boyhood summers.

    As I stated earlier, for Americans above all it's a symbol of summer. Of warm, lazy afternoons in the backyard. A place where the man of the house takes a nap after mowing the lawn, or else goofs off and avoids his chores. It's a classic, instantly recognizable image with Americans.
  • Aleco_Graves

    Posts: 708

    Oct 01, 2016 9:17 PM GMT
    i love mine just see my old profile pic on here!
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    Oct 02, 2016 12:33 AM GMT
    Aleco_Graves said
    i love mine just see my old profile pic on here!

    A banana hammock in a hammock? Looking good. icon_biggrin.gif