How many resume' do you have?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 07, 2016 11:11 PM GMT
    Why have more than one?

    You know, its more than a pain in the ass trying to get work from todays extremely picky employers, especially if your career has you working for someone else. But with all the sometimes, over the top "requirements" now mandated by employers, having a specific resume, catered to their business is going a bit too far.

    My current one resume is "diversified" for a reason. It shows I have multiple industries and multiple experience with multiple products, processes and materials. This job recruiter wants me to "tailor" my resume down to a specific industry and its specific product. icon_confused.gif

    If I did this, I would have 6 different resumes, one resume for each industry I worked and the product line or material I worked with icon_confused.gif

    Why am I being asked to tailor my resume for one type of product or industry? This makes no sense to me.

    How many resume' do you have and if you have more than one, how and why do you have different ones?

    Do you have more than one career path? This would makes sense but my current career is not of different paths
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    Oct 07, 2016 11:23 PM GMT
    Say you are a Lawyer

    You specialize in:

    Business Law
    Employment Law
    Accident Injury Law
    Family Law

    How do you build your resume(s)?
    Do you have one resume for each type law you practice or one resume "portfolio" style that shows all of your practice?
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    Oct 07, 2016 11:39 PM GMT
    Not that I've used one in a while, but I'd always tailor my resume toward the job i sent it to...

    Applying for a management position, I'd emphasize the teams I led and the successes I had... But If i was aplkying for a teaching position, I'd emphasize the classes I taught, and coursework I developed.

    Neither of those positions, for example, would care about my IT expertise, so I wouldn't emphasize that on those resume, but iWould if i was applying for a techie job.

    Experience, positions, education are all the same... But objectives, skills, and strengths ought to be targeted.
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    Oct 07, 2016 11:41 PM GMT
    This particular job recruiter is asking me to pigeonhole my resume? icon_confused.gif


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    Oct 08, 2016 12:02 AM GMT
    JonSpringon saidNot that I've used one in a while, but I'd always tailor my resume toward the job i sent it to...

    Applying for a management position, I'd emphasize the teams I led and the successes I had... But If i was aplkying for a teaching position, I'd emphasize the classes I taught, and coursework I developed.

    Neither of those positions, for example, would care about my IT expertise, so I wouldn't emphasize that on those resume, but iWould if i was applying for a techie job.

    Experience, positions, education are all the same... But objectives, skills, and strengths ought to be targeted.






    Job seekers like myself and others send out 100's of resumes. This just does not make sense from a organizational perspective as long as the main job category does not change. My current career falls under the "manufacturing" job category with sub category of "industrial engineering". If I started a new career, such as Human Resource management, then I could justify a new resume that of course tailors to this job category.

    As a new teacher, why wouldn't the new school NOT want to know about your IT expertise? I would think that if you were to stay at this teaching job, probably under a union contract, for a number of years, building tenure, that your IT expertise would come in handy if you ever wanted to move laterally within the same school system. As described above, you have now pigeonholed yourself at this particular school by omitting you have other transferable skills.

    I think a lot of people make this mistake, therefore become unhappy at work when they feel underappreciated, underutilized or underpaid icon_idea.gif



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    Oct 08, 2016 2:26 AM GMT
    ELNathB said
    JonSpringon saidNot that I've used one in a while, but I'd always tailor my resume toward the job i sent it to...

    Applying for a management position, I'd emphasize the teams I led and the successes I had... But If i was aplkying for a teaching position, I'd emphasize the classes I taught, and coursework I developed.

    Neither of those positions, for example, would care about my IT expertise, so I wouldn't emphasize that on those resume, but iWould if i was applying for a techie job.

    Experience, positions, education are all the same... But objectives, skills, and strengths ought to be targeted.






    Job seekers like myself and others send out 100's of resumes. This just does not make sense from a organizational perspective as long as the main job category does not change. My current career falls under the "manufacturing" job category with sub category of "industrial engineering". If I started a new career, such as Human Resource management, then I could justify a new resume that of course tailors to this job category.

    As a new teacher, why wouldn't the new school NOT want to know about your IT expertise? I would think that if you were to stay at this teaching job, probably under a union contract, for a number of years, building tenure, that your IT expertise would come in handy if you ever wanted to move laterally within the same school system. As described above, you have now pigeonholed yourself at this particular school by omitting you have other transferable skills.

    I think a lot of people make this mistake, therefore become unhappy at work when they feel underappreciated, underutilized or underpaid icon_idea.gif

    I never sent out 100s of resumes, or I might agree with you. That's impossible to tailor to.

    Also, I never said to "Omit" anything... I just talked about "emphasis" on the pertinent things.

    Diff'rent strokes for diff'rent folks... I'm happy at work, appreciated, and rather well paid.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 08, 2016 5:46 AM GMT
    [JonSpringon saidNot that I've used one in a while, but I'd always tailor my resume toward the job i sent it to...

    I'm happy at work, appreciated, and rather well paid.[/quote]

    ...And kind of adorable...
  • jeep334

    Posts: 408

    Oct 08, 2016 10:12 AM GMT
    sunjbill said[JonSpringon saidNot that I've used one in a while, but I'd always tailor my resume toward the job i sent it to...

    I'm happy at work, appreciated, and rather well paid.


    ...And kind of adorable...[/quote]


    ^This
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14345

    Oct 08, 2016 3:47 PM GMT
    JonSpringon said
    ELNathB said
    JonSpringon saidNot that I've used one in a while, but I'd always tailor my resume toward the job i sent it to...

    Applying for a management position, I'd emphasize the teams I led and the successes I had... But If i was aplkying for a teaching position, I'd emphasize the classes I taught, and coursework I developed.

    Neither of those positions, for example, would care about my IT expertise, so I wouldn't emphasize that on those resume, but iWould if i was applying for a techie job.

    Experience, positions, education are all the same... But objectives, skills, and strengths ought to be targeted.






    Job seekers like myself and others send out 100's of resumes. This just does not make sense from a organizational perspective as long as the main job category does not change. My current career falls under the "manufacturing" job category with sub category of "industrial engineering". If I started a new career, such as Human Resource management, then I could justify a new resume that of course tailors to this job category.

    As a new teacher, why wouldn't the new school NOT want to know about your IT expertise? I would think that if you were to stay at this teaching job, probably under a union contract, for a number of years, building tenure, that your IT expertise would come in handy if you ever wanted to move laterally within the same school system. As described above, you have now pigeonholed yourself at this particular school by omitting you have other transferable skills.

    I think a lot of people make this mistake, therefore become unhappy at work when they feel underappreciated, underutilized or underpaid icon_idea.gif

    I never sent out 100s of resumes, or I might agree with you. That's impossible to tailor to.

    Also, I never said to "Omit" anything... I just talked about "emphasis" on the pertinent things.

    Diff'rent strokes for diff'rent folks... I'm happy at work, appreciated, and rather well paid.
    I wish that I could say that but in todays economy, low stagnant wages, no benefits, no paid time off, and lousy service sector work are the norm.icon_sad.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 08, 2016 4:15 PM GMT
    roadbikeRob said
    JonSpringon said
    ELNathB said
    JonSpringon saidNot that I've used one in a while, but I'd always tailor my resume toward the job i sent it to...

    Applying for a management position, I'd emphasize the teams I led and the successes I had... But If i was aplkying for a teaching position, I'd emphasize the classes I taught, and coursework I developed.

    Neither of those positions, for example, would care about my IT expertise, so I wouldn't emphasize that on those resume, but iWould if i was applying for a techie job.

    Experience, positions, education are all the same... But objectives, skills, and strengths ought to be targeted.






    Job seekers like myself and others send out 100's of resumes. This just does not make sense from a organizational perspective as long as the main job category does not change. My current career falls under the "manufacturing" job category with sub category of "industrial engineering". If I started a new career, such as Human Resource management, then I could justify a new resume that of course tailors to this job category.

    As a new teacher, why wouldn't the new school NOT want to know about your IT expertise? I would think that if you were to stay at this teaching job, probably under a union contract, for a number of years, building tenure, that your IT expertise would come in handy if you ever wanted to move laterally within the same school system. As described above, you have now pigeonholed yourself at this particular school by omitting you have other transferable skills.

    I think a lot of people make this mistake, therefore become unhappy at work when they feel underappreciated, underutilized or underpaid icon_idea.gif

    I never sent out 100s of resumes, or I might agree with you. That's impossible to tailor to.

    Also, I never said to "Omit" anything... I just talked about "emphasis" on the pertinent things.

    Diff'rent strokes for diff'rent folks... I'm happy at work, appreciated, and rather well paid.
    I wish that I could say that but in todays economy, low stagnant wages, no benefits, no paid time off, and lousy service sector work are the norm.icon_sad.gif


    Very true. And it's going to get much worse if Hillary is elected. Hillary promised exactly that to the honchos at Goldman Sachs and other Wall St. investment banks.

    Young, college educated workers don't believe they will be affected. But as they age, they'll get replaced by foreign workers, H1B visa holders and more recent graduates....throngs willing to work 60-70hrs a week for lower and lower pay. Supply and demand. When Obama promised to "spread the wealth around" people assumed they would be the beneficiaries of that largesse....not the victims.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 08, 2016 6:50 PM GMT
    if i were looking for an employ:
    i keep a computer folder of both cover letters & resume for each employer
    i assume the resume goes to the hiring manager and they want the best information possible

    everyone, very best of luck.
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    Oct 08, 2016 8:34 PM GMT
    jeep334 said
    sunjbill said[JonSpringon saidNot that I've used one in a while, but I'd always tailor my resume toward the job i sent it to...

    I'm happy at work, appreciated, and rather well paid.


    ...And kind of adorable...



    ^This [/quote]
    Aw, shucks guys.... Makin' me blush... Thanks!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 09, 2016 2:38 AM GMT
    ELNathB saidWhy have more than one?

    You know, its more than a pain in the ass trying to get work from todays extremely picky employers, especially if your career has you working for someone else. But with all the sometimes, over the top "requirements" now mandated by employers, having a specific resume, catered to their business is going a bit too far.

    My current one resume is "diversified" for a reason. It shows I have multiple industries and multiple experience with multiple products, processes and materials. This job recruiter wants me to "tailor" my resume down to a specific industry and its specific product. icon_confused.gif

    If I did this, I would have 6 different resumes, one resume for each industry I worked and the product line or material I worked with icon_confused.gif

    Why am I being asked to tailor my resume for one type of product or industry? This makes no sense to me.

    How many resume' do you have and if you have more than one, how and why do you have different ones?

    Do you have more than one career path? This would makes sense but my current career is not of different paths


    Your questions indicate why you are unable to get ahead, you're inflexible. A Career Counselor may be of help.
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    Oct 09, 2016 4:31 AM GMT
    I always tailored my résumé to the job. And did the same when I helped friends. Got great results.

    Although in my case I gotta admit I really wasn't looking that hard, just sampling. A few times I considered leaving my Army career, and after retirement I just thought maybe I should get back in harness. Even tried teaching HS for a brief period. But I decided I was happy where I was, and retirement suited me. Still does, doing charity volunteer work as I wish, to keep me more or less occupied.

    What I discovered was to bulletize the résumé, condensed to 1-page. It's not an autobiography. If you absolutely must provide more then make them attachments, not the main résumé. And to tailor each submission to exactly what the job announcement wants, hitting as many of the requirements as you can satisfy.

    Use strong positive action verbs to start your bullets. "Directed... Controlled... Oversaw... Responsible for... Created... Initiated..." A good résumé guide will provide you with a lexicon of these verbs to use.

    Large companies get hundreds of these applications a day. Your résumé will get just a cursory glance for key words. In some mega-companies they even electronically scan the résumés with computers, that select the ones with the key words for further HR human staff review, and reject the rest.

    The job description and announcement, plus the nature of the business, tells you what those key words are. If you're applying to a computer software company you better use a lot of the industry buzzwords. Or to an engineering firm do likewise.

    Some of you guys may be just starting out, and have no work history. Use what you've got, it may be more than you realize.

    When I taught college Army ROTC a lot of these young Freshman thought they had no chance at one of our full scholarships. The payback being 4 years service as an Officer. With not the worst entry-level paycheck out there, and a lot of respect & prestige. And then they could resign if they wished. Having created a great résumé for their next civilian employment, still in their 20s.

    But we judged on the basis of the "Whole Person Concept". They didn't have to have a perfect 4.0 GPA coming out of high school, we looked at everything they had done. Active with 4-H (very big where we were), Dairy Association, Eagle Boy Scout, HS Class President or other elected position or work history, just anything they had done that might show community involvement, drive, and leadership potential for a future Army leader,

    I would write these kids applications for them, highlighting their simple HS-years accomplishments in their résumés, things that they didn't recognize themselves. So that our contracted cadets had an 85% scholarship rate, one of the highest in all of ROTC nationwide. I was very proud that I, and my fellow ROTC Officers, did the same thing for all these young kids. Some of whom could barely afford to be in college at all otherwise.

    I followed some of them during their careers. A few visited me at my Army home years later at Ft. Sam Houston. San Antonio, TX. One served as a combat helicopter fighter in the first Gulf War, I think the first female ever in that role. Our ROTC program mainly prepared cadets to become Army aviators, primarily with rotary wing.
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    Oct 09, 2016 11:02 PM GMT
    I knew there was def "something wrong" with todays advertised job descriptions icon_evil.gif

    Remind me never to move or apply for work anywhere near these districts, I feel very bad for those in southern, liberal Florida icon_rolleyes.gif

    The United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit (in case citations, 11th Cir. or CA11) is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts:
    Middle District of Alabama
    Northern District of Alabama
    Southern District of Alabama
    Middle District of Florida
    Northern District of Florida
    Southern District of Florida
    Middle District of Georgia
    Northern District of Georgia
    Southern District of Georgia



    Subtle Age Discrimination Gets a Court's Blessing
    https://www.bloomberg.com/view/articles/2016-10-09/subtle-age-discrimination-gets-a-court-s-blessing

    A company puts out word that it’s hiring: recent college graduates only, no experienced salespeople need apply. That’s age discrimination, right? Not according to a ruling from a federal appeals court last week.

    Overturning a half-century of practice, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit held that job applicants can’t benefit from the disparate-impact provision of the Age Discrimination in Employment Act -- only employees can. The decision, based on a literal reading of the text, flies in the face of logic and common sense. Other circuits won’t agree -- and the U.S. Supreme Court should take the case and reverse the holding.

    The employment act expressly prohibits intentional age discrimination both in hiring job applicants and in firing employees. The case decided by the appeals court arises from a separate provision of the law that says employers can’t adopt policies that have the effect of treating people disparately based on age.

    That provision, Section 4(a)2, says it’s unlawful for an employer to “limit, segregate, or classify his employees in any way which would deprive or tend to deprive any individual of employment opportunities or otherwise adversely affect his status as an employee, because of such individual’s age.”

    You’ll notice the provision doesn’t specifically mention job applicants. But Congress pretty clearly meant to prohibit hiring policies that have discriminatory effects. And the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission long ago adopted a rule interpreting the law to extend to age-discriminatory hiring practices

    Richard Villarreal, then 49, encountered exactly that kind of discriminatory hiring policy when he applied for a job as a territorial manager with tobacco giant R.J. Reynolds. RJR outsourced its hiring, but provided discriminatory guidelines. It told the human resources company that its “targeted candidate” would be a person “2–3 years out of college” who “adjusts easily to changes.” The guidelines said to “stay away from” applicants who had been “in sales for 8–10 years.”

    That’s classic disparate-impact discrimination. The guidelines don’t say “no older people.” Instead they create conditions that seem neutral -- you can graduate from college at any age -- but as applied will lead to hiring almost all young people. The EEOC told Villarreal he could go ahead and sue RJR.

    But the 11th Circuit, sitting en banc, threw out Villarreal’s claim. It held that the language of the disparate-impact provision in the age-discrimination act excludes job hiring.
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    Oct 10, 2016 5:13 AM GMT
    I have three C.V.'s. Paragraph, one-page, and long-form, that go out with project proposals and (now almost never) press releases, as required. Only government grant proposals really require the long-form. There is a similar set that describes my business, rather than me. ("Facilities" and "Qualifications.")

    When seeking a job, I always carefully read the call and tailor the resume to the job. Industry is interested in project management, not publications or classes taught. Academia, the opposite. Government is interested in how you can help your boss get money, promotions and power.
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    Oct 10, 2016 5:50 AM GMT
    mindgarden said
    Government is interested in how you can help your boss get money, promotions and power.

    Very true. And so was the military. I learned early that the best way to make myself look good was to make my bosses look good.

    Now we didn't write résumés as such, but we did have to provide input to our "rater" (most immediate supervisor) for the preparation of our annual (or change of duty) Officer Evaluation Report (OER). In it we listed all the "wonderful" things we had accomplished since our last rating, bulletized like many résumés are, starting each line with all those powerful action verbs.

    If you did it right, and assuming your rater concurred, he/she might just replicate it verbatim onto your OER to save their effort. For years I had nothing but "walk on water" OERs, as we called them, when you got top-blocked on everything, and surpassed every other Officer in your peer group.

    And of course got the most highly sought-after "Promote immediately ahead of peers" final endorsement, which a senior rater (your second, more senior approving rater) could give to only 1 of his subordinates, and not always given then. Some senior raters never gave them. And the higher in rank you went, the more subordinates your senior rater might have, sometimes dozens upon dozens. I always got it over all others, without fail.

    But then I made my bosses look good. I knew how to play the game. And I guess had the ability. By making them look good, I got advanced. But then I was lucky. Because I always worked for ethical bosses. I knew some cases of sleaze bosses who took the credit for themselves and screwed their subordinates who had done the actual work, had the ideas. You hadda watch out for that, too. Talk about your career minefields! LOL!