Prostate Cancer Aftermath

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 01, 2016 1:19 AM GMT
    It's now been 5 years since I was treated for prostate cancer, just had the anniversary. Not sure this is the ideal forum, but I can't find a better. And only men have prostate cancer.

    No cancer recurrence, or spread. I appear to be doing well. I had radiation therapy, with additional radioactive seed implants into the prostate, and testosterone hormone suppression injections. But no chemo, so I lost no hair on my head. Did lose some body hair, though, now returned after the injections stopped.

    I became neither impotent nor incontinent. A friend of mine in another State had a complete surgical prostate removal, and he suffers both those conditions, apparently permanently.

    Of course the choice of treatment is based on your cancer condition, and what you and you doctor decide. Mine told me I had the choice of prostate removal, or radiation therapy. Seeing what had happened to my friend, I said radiation, please!

    A negative consequence is I don't have a good feel for how full my bladder is. I guess those nerves were kinda numbed by the radiation.

    When I feel slight fullness I try to find a restroom, or at home. I often end up peeing a quart. And if I really feel the urge, it's urgent! Like right now, or I'm gonna piss on the floor.

    Still, I'm alive 5 years later, and I can't disregard that. My cancer was advanced, and aggressive, according to the doctors. Just like my Father's, and it killed him.

    And I also panicked at one point. Knowing the doctors had been lying to my Dad, not telling him he was already terminal with his advanced prostate cancer. And asking my sister & me to go along with the deception. I wondered if I was now being deceived, too.

    Well, after 5 years this month I guess not. If any of you guys ever have a prostate issue, please don't hesitate to contact me. I've had it all: chronic prostatitis infection, blockage, cancer.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 01, 2016 2:09 PM GMT
    art_deco saidIt's now been 5 years since I was treated for prostate cancer, just had the anniversary. Not sure this is the ideal forum, but I can't find a better. And only men have prostate cancer.

    No cancer recurrence, or spread. I appear to be doing well. I had radiation therapy, with additional radioactive seed implants into the prostate, and testosterone hormone suppression injections. But no chemo, so I lost no hair on my head. Did lose some body hair, though, now returned after the injections stopped.

    I became neither impotent nor incontinent. A friend of mine in another State had a complete surgical prostate removal, and he suffers both those conditions, apparently permanently.

    Of course the choice of treatment is based on your cancer condition, and what you and you doctor decide. Mine told me I had the choice of prostate removal, or radiation therapy. Seeing what had happened to my friend, I said radiation, please!

    A negative consequence is I don't have a good feel for how full my bladder is. I guess those nerves were kinda numbed by the radiation.

    When I feel slight fullness I try to find a restroom, or at home. I often end up peeing a quart. And if I really feel the urge, it's urgent! Like right now, or I'm gonna piss on the floor.

    Still, I'm alive 5 years later, and I can't disregard that. My cancer was advanced, and aggressive, according to the doctors. Just like my Father's, and it killed him.

    And I also panicked at one point. Knowing the doctors had been lying to my Dad, not telling him he was already terminal with his advanced prostate cancer. And asking my sister & me to go along with the deception. I wondered if I was now being deceived, too.

    Well, after 5 years this month I guess not. If any of you guys ever have a prostate issue, please don't hesitate to contact me. I've had it all: chronic prostatitis infection, blockage, cancer.


    If anyone is told they need surgery, the new cyberknife robotic surgery should be investigated:

    http://www.cyberknife.com/cyberknife-treatments/prostate/how-used-treat-cancer.aspx



  • ClassicIrish

    Posts: 25

    Jan 26, 2017 1:19 AM GMT
    mx5guynj said
    art_deco saidIt's now been 5 years since I was treated for prostate cancer, just had the anniversary. Not sure this is the ideal forum, but I can't find a better. And only men have prostate cancer.

    No cancer recurrence, or spread. I appear to be doing well. I had radiation therapy, with additional radioactive seed implants into the prostate, and testosterone hormone suppression injections. But no chemo, so I lost no hair on my head. Did lose some body hair, though, now returned after the injections stopped.

    I became neither impotent nor incontinent. A friend of mine in another State had a complete surgical prostate removal, and he suffers both those conditions, apparently permanently.

    Of course the choice of treatment is based on your cancer condition, and what you and you doctor decide. Mine told me I had the choice of prostate removal, or radiation therapy. Seeing what had happened to my friend, I said radiation, please!

    A negative consequence is I don't have a good feel for how full my bladder is. I guess those nerves were kinda numbed by the radiation.

    When I feel slight fullness I try to find a restroom, or at home. I often end up peeing a quart. And if I really feel the urge, it's urgent! Like right now, or I'm gonna piss on the floor.

    Still, I'm alive 5 years later, and I can't disregard that. My cancer was advanced, and aggressive, according to the doctors. Just like my Father's, and it killed him.

    And I also panicked at one point. Knowing the doctors had been lying to my Dad, not telling him he was already terminal with his advanced prostate cancer. And asking my sister & me to go along with the deception. I wondered if I was now being deceived, too.

    Well, after 5 years this month I guess not. If any of you guys ever have a prostate issue, please don't hesitate to contact me. I've had it all: chronic prostatitis infection, blockage, cancer.


    If anyone is told they need surgery, the new cyberknife robotic surgery should be investigated:

    http://www.cyberknife.com/cyberknife-treatments/prostate/how-used-treat-cancer.aspx

    I had my prostate removed back in July 2002 and TG feeling fine today, so was lucky at the time as it was my annual PSA test that alerted me to a problem. Guys should have regular PSA tests once they pass 40.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 26, 2017 2:06 AM GMT
    ClassicIrish said
    I had my prostate removed back in July 2002 and TG feeling fine today, so was lucky at the time as it was my annual PSA test that alerted me to a problem. Guys should have regular PSA tests once they pass 40.

    A high PSA was how mine was detected, as well. But a lot of doctors in the US are now discouraging having PSAs in men over 50, as was previously done. Because it led to false diagnoses of cancer.

    Well yeah, if you or your stupid doctor don't know what the PSA is reporting. It merely means your prostate is irritated by something, and is putting out this specific antigen into your blood.

    Do you know your PSA spikes a little NORMALLY following an ejaculation? Yeah. So if you're being properly advised you're told to abstain from any sex (including masturbation) for 3 days prior to the blood draw.

    An elevated PSA can also mean your prostate has an infection. That needs some antibiotics, but we're not talking removal. I had an earlier history of prostatis, so my elevated PSA didn't alarm me, and my doctor gave me pills.

    Well, it continued to test high PSA, and just kept getting higher. Finally my primary physician said I really had to get a biopsy. I was dreading that, but went ahead.

    The urologist who did it told me he used recently developed methods, that were practically painless. He was right! I kicked myself afterwards for not having done it sooner.

    It confirmed I did have cancer. And a rather widespread aggressive one, and I was assigned a "Gleason Score" of 8, the max being 10. Immediate treatment was urgent.

    Older guys are sometimes advised to "watch & wait" if their Gleason score is low, the cancer less aggressive. The thinking is that an older guy will more often die of other causes before the prostate cancer gets out of control, and he can avoid the expense & risks of intervention treatment. But mine already was that far, and I was "only" 62, hopefully with some 20 or so years ahead of me. Something had to be done right now.

    Well, the PSA blood test saved my life. I can't imagine why you wouldn't want to have it done annually. Prostate cancer is virtually a given for older men. Even more common than female breast cancer, that gets all the attention & publicity.

    Just understand what PSA means. It's NOT a cancer test. It tests for prostate distress or irritation. If it's merely an infection you want that treated, too, don't you? Otherwise you can experience blockage peeing, and also pain if you bottom.

    Yah know, if you're a man yah gotta understand men's health. I sometimes think we need an owners manual for our bodies, because I sure wasn't taught any of this in my high school health classes. Without that PSA test, and a doctor who persuaded me to have the biopsy, I'd be dead today (something that would please the RJ trolls).

    If you're up around 50 insist on the PSA test being included in your regular blood draw panel, that should be done annually. Override your doctor if he says you don't need it. You DO! Take control of your own health.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 27, 2017 4:14 AM GMT
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3134227/

    art, if testosterone suppression is part of the therapy, I wonder why aren't younger men who have the highest testosterone the ones most affected by this? Wouldn't testosterone suppression be just a rough and indirect way to suppress estrogens, these ones perhaps being the most likely culprit (see the article from pubmed)? Aromatase converts testosterone into estrogens, so with less input (testosterone) you get less output (estrogens) which could explain the efficacy of the treatment.
  • rnch

    Posts: 11556

    Jan 27, 2017 1:44 PM GMT
    Congrats on a full recovery and continued good health.

    icon_biggrin.gif
  • musclmed

    Posts: 3591

    Jan 30, 2017 5:26 AM GMT
    bachian saidhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3134227/

    art, if testosterone suppression is part of the therapy, I wonder why aren't younger men who have the highest testosterone the ones most affected by this? Wouldn't testosterone suppression be just a rough and indirect way to suppress estrogens, these ones perhaps being the most likely culprit (see the article from pubmed)? Aromatase converts testosterone into estrogens, so with less input (testosterone) you get less output (estrogens) which could explain the efficacy of the treatment.


    Its a complicated situation. But infection seems to play a part in prostate cancer including genetics. There is data that men with lower testosterone levels seem to be more predisposed to aggressive cancer.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22584031