Group Activity: Making Money via the Stock Market for Retirement and Before

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 30, 2016 3:58 PM GMT
    What Were Some of the Places for Making Money via the Stock Market for Retirement and Before - Monthly YTD T. Rowe Price Funds as of Fri., Dec. 30, 2016?

    Dividend Growth - 10.21%
    Equity Income - 17.32%
    Financial Services - 11.71%
    Emerging Markets Value Stocks - 11.33%
    Emerging Europe - 13.18%
    Emerging Markets Stock - 11.33%
    Japan - 11.85%
    Latin America - 29.61%

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    Dec 30, 2016 4:02 PM GMT
    29.61% Latin America - 29.61%
    17.32% Equity Income - 17.32%
    13.18% Emerging Europe - 13.18%
    11.85% Japan - 11.85%
    11.71% Financial Services - 11.71%
    11.33% Emerging Markets Value Stocks - 11.33%
    11.33% Emerging Markets Stock - 11.33%
    10.21% Dividend Growth - 10.21%

    Interesting.
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    Dec 30, 2016 10:19 PM GMT
    However, Friday's losses barely put a dent in an otherwise robust year for US stocks, with the market maintaining most of its winnings since the Republican sweep of the November US elections, which sparked hopes of more growth-friendly policies from Washington.

    The Dow finished the year up 13.4 percent while the S&P 500 rose 9.5 percent and the Nasdaq 7.5 percent.

    Source: Yahoo News (checked today, Friday, December 30, 2016, 4:10 pm Central Time)
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    Jan 05, 2017 7:30 PM GMT
    Who wants to try this with me?

    HowTheMarketWorks.com
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    Jan 05, 2017 7:32 PM GMT
    I selected to start with $1,000,000.
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    Jan 05, 2017 8:06 PM GMT
    Now, a look at some Vanguard Funds

    50.64% Precious Metals and Mining / Stock - Sector
    33.10% Energy / Stock - Sector
    25.73% Tax-Managed Small-Cap Admiral Shares / Stock - Small-Cap Blend
    20.67% Explorer Value / Stock - Small-Cap Value
    16.86% Emerging Markets Select Stock / International
    16.75% High Dividend Yield Index / Stock - Large-Cap Value
    16.13% Extended Market Index Admiral Shares / Stock - Mid-Cap Blend
    15.26% Mid-Cap Value Index Admiral / Stock - Mid-Cap Value
    14.70% Equity Income / Stock - Large-Cap Value
    12.33% Explorer / Stock - Small-Cap Growth
    11.97% Growth and Income / Stock - Large-Cap Blend
    11.81% Capital Value / Stock-Mid-Cap Value
    11.79% Dividend Appreciation Index Admiral Shares / Stock-Large-Cap Blend
    11.73% Emergig Markets Stock Index Admiral Shares
    11.19% High-Yield Corporate / Bond - Inter-term Low Quality
    10.24% FTSE Social Index / Stock - Large-Cap Growth

    Vanguard ETFs
    28.93% Energy ETF / Stock - Sector
    24.80% Small-Cap Value ETF / Stock - Small-Cap Value
    24.75% Financials ETF / Stock - Sector
    22.60% Telecommunicatoin Services ETF / Stock - Sector
    21.46% Materials ETF / Stock - Sector
    20.43% Industrials ETF / Stock - Sector
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    Jan 05, 2017 8:22 PM GMT
    T. Rowe Price beat Vanguard on Latin America (Vanguard does not have an international fund or ETF that is Latin America only).
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    Jan 05, 2017 8:40 PM GMT
    Vanguard beat T. Rowe Price on Precious Metals at 51% (T. Rowe Price does not have a Precious Metals fund);
    but, Fidelity beat Vanguard with Fidelity's Precious Metals fund earning 87%. So, what is that? If a person had $100K and put it all there, they would have made $87K.
    However, you could not have lived off of any of that $100K during the year. You would have been making money for 2017.

    Let's say you need $60K for 2017. Then, you would have increased your investment a/c from 100K to 127K.
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    Jan 11, 2017 9:45 PM GMT
    Let's figure out Quadruple Witching

    http://www.investopedia.com/terms/q/quadruplewitching.asp

    third Friday of every month, all four asset classes expire simultaneously on the third Friday of March, June, September and December. Much of the action surrounding futures and options on quadruple witching days is focused on offsetting, closing or rolling out positions, as well as arbitrage trades, with the result being elevated volume, particularly in the last hour of trading.

    2017

    March 17

    June 16

    September 15

    December 15

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    Jan 24, 2017 5:45 PM GMT
    John Person / personsplanet.com
    High Close Doji Trigger
    For the next two, see personsplanet.com, Person's Indicators
    Pivots Studies
    Person's Proprietary Studies (PPS)


    Dr. Thomas Carr / Dr. Stoxx (formerly befriend the trend) / drstoxx.com

    TD Ameritrade Think or Swim
    with John Person's PPS Studies
    with Person's Pivots Studies
    tlc.thinkorswim.com/center/tutorial.htl

    StockCharts.com

    Fund Houses
    Fidelity
    Vanguard
    T. Rowe Price

    Morningstar.com

    Periodicals:
    Barron's
    BloombergBusinessweek and Bloomberg Markets
    Financial Times
    Fortune
    IBD
    Institutional Investor
    Kiplingers
    Money
    The Economist
    Wall Street Journal

    Monthly Meetings
    Association for Technical Analysis (Addison, TX)
    IBD Meetups (nationwide)

  • Jan 25, 2017 10:24 PM GMT
    Ive made over 28K in 5 weeks on just 2 stocks.. Starting with around 7K. Ive been averaging 1500-3800 dollars a day in gains.
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    Jan 26, 2017 3:34 AM GMT
    The work begins.

    Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, 1/2017, p 19, “My 10 Top Stock Picks for 2017”
    by James K. Glassman

    Take-Two Interactive Software (TTWO)
    Held by World Innovators Fund
    The company makes video games such as Grand Theft Auto. Take-Two’s revenues and profits have been bouncing up and down lately with the popularity of its products, but analysts see brisk earnings gains for the year ahead. Flush with cash, the firm could be a takeover target. With a market capitalization of $3.8 billion, Take-Two has about $1.5 billion in cash and short-term investments and just $500 million in debt.

    Henry Schein (HSIC)
    Held by T. Rowe Price New Horizons (a hot venue for small- and midsize-company growth stocks since 1960.
    Schein is an 84-year-old company that distributes health supplies to physicians, dentists, and veterinarians. A mid-cap stock, Schein is not a superfast grower, but it has a rock-solid niche, with earnings expected to rise at a good clip.

    Salesforce.com (CRM)
    Held by Raymond James (Terry Tillman, technology analyst)
    Salesforce.com is a rapidly expanding company that sells web-based software that helps companies manage relationships with their customers. (Salesforce did not purchase Twitter.) Tillman sees revenues rising by 25% in the fiscal year that ends January 31, 2017, and by 21% for the following year.
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    Jan 26, 2017 4:07 AM GMT
    gayinacworthga saidIve made over 28K in 5 weeks on just 2 stocks.. Starting with around 7K. Ive been averaging 1500-3800 dollars a day in gains.


    Well, you know what I will be using (shown above). I do not consider myself a day trader. I consider myself a short term trader.
    I'm setting up my policies and procedures now.

    There are many technical day traders like you that are doing this now. I have to get there. Yes, I would like to make, say, $2,000 a week / 8,000 a month / $96,000 a year.
    That would be $4,000 a month or less to live off, pay all sorts of taxes and have medical insurance and the other $4,000 going into trading funds and long term funds 80%/20% (aggressively growing my trading business).

    An article I have to read, then study, then make policy: "High Close Doji Trigger."

    See, you're only using two stocks. I'm currently gathering a list of stocks. If your two stocks are small cap, that's not me. I might do a small cap mutual fund, but that's about it.

    I don't do options. After I get to, say $600,000, I might consider becoming an expert at options and opening an account for $100,000 for options trading.

    Google Question: What household income is considered affluent?
    Result:
    average household income is currently around $52,000, which means if you want to be considered a mass affluent household, then you must earn at least $76,000 a year.

    = = =

    Middle Class in Texas is $34K - $103K

    http://www.businessinsider.com/middle-class-in-every-us-state-2015-4

    Given the data above, I do not see $250K for any state. The highest is $145K.

    = = =

    Looking at my last set of policies and procedures, I was using

    MA
    MACD
    ADX
    On-balance volume
    RSI and gaps
    CCI and gaps
    Stochastics

    I hadn't incorporated candlesticks into my trading policies and procedures.

    Where are your stocks? Dow? S&P? Nasdaq?
    What technique/s are you using?
    Are you using studies on your charts? As mentioned above, I'm going to use two of Person's studies.


    I'm thinking seriously about not using the Fidelity platform for my trades but T.D. Ameritrade's Think or Swim.
    I have to see the cost per trade.
    I probably will put my mutual fund trades with Fidelity or maybe a Roth account with Fidelity and the rest with TD Ameritrade.
    I better call Fidelity tomorrow and see if there trading platform can have studies added to it.
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    Jan 26, 2017 4:11 AM GMT
    With me not doing options, I cannot make money on bear trends.
    So, my portfolio of choice stocks have to be upwardly mobile stocks.

    My risk policy, obviously uses stops. Yes, there are traders out there looking to catch stops--my stops and everybody else's stops.
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    Jan 26, 2017 4:52 AM GMT
    For the Conservative percentage of my portfolio, I am looking at Barron's, Jan. 2, 2017, "Best Income Ideas for 2017"

    European dividend stocks, nestle, Royal Dutch with yields up to 7%.
    Electric utilities and U.S. dividend stocks are good.

    5% over 12 months sounds horrible given the upward price trends I'm going to be riding in trading activity.
    I can grab a 5% price increase in one month.
    Furthermore, 1% a month annualizes to 12.68%

    So, if I keep making monthly trades that sell after a 1% increase 12 times. I can easily beat the 5% with the 12.68%

    1.4% annualizes to 18%
    https://www.sapling.com/5876644/convert-monthly-interest-annual-rate

    Yes, I do have to reinvest the funds AND subtract the buy and sell fees. talk...think...conclusion on backburner to the effect of 2% increase to cover transaction expenses.

    2% annualizes to 26.8%

    Also, if you know the monthly rate, which is the same in all months, all you need to do is calculate the annualized returns using the following formula:
    APY = (1 + R)^12 - 1

    So, if the monthly rate is 2% for all months, the annualized rate is:

    = (1+2%)^12 – 1

    = 1.02^12-1 = 0.2682 or 26.82%

    http://financetrain.com/how-to-annualize-monthly-returns-example/

    = = =

    Look like I'm going to have to let that go. 5% over 12 months is just lazy.
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    Jan 26, 2017 5:03 AM GMT
    AT&T had a double digit price appreciation with 4.6% yield. Ticker symbol T
    Verizon had a double digit price appreciation with 4.3% yield. Ticker symbol VZ

    I want to double check their beginning of 2016 price against their end of 2016 price.

    Yep, AT&T went from about 35 to about 42.7
    And, Verizon went from about 46 to about 52

    Barron's is saying to stay clear of telecom in 2017.

    Well, one thing: I know 2G phones were called in by end of 2016, so sales growth into replacement phones has happened and there probably won't be a shutting down of 3G phones in 2017 for a sales pop. Maybe there was telecom growth in 2016 for people ditching 2G phones, even though carriers replaced some 2G phones at their expense.
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    Jan 26, 2017 5:25 AM GMT
    I got rid of one 2G phone. I have to get rid of my dark red Blackberry Curve phone after I delete all of my contacts. AT&T told me they would recycle it for parts.

    So, 5% APR plus 20% positive price change is my hypothetical IRR. And bottom line #2: i still have to read the Barron's article 1/2/2017: Best Income Ideas for 2017 to find which ticker symbol might do that in 2017, especially depending on when you get in to get the full ride of dividends and the best ride up and out of price appreciation.
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    Jan 26, 2017 6:26 PM GMT
    Google: Can Day Traders be self-employed?
    Result:
    http://www.marketwatch.com/story/tax-strategies-for-day-traders-2015-02-25

    main-qimg-1287b0fbb5a521aab78099d3c5f078
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    Jan 26, 2017 6:29 PM GMT
    https://www.quora.com/What-is-it-like-being-a-self-employed-day-trader

    main-qimg-2648fe04d0962dbbee9829cccae9ea
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    Feb 03, 2017 6:59 PM GMT
    I no longer can use the How the Market Works website.

    T. D. Ameritrade has paper trading.
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    Feb 03, 2017 8:51 PM GMT
    Watching and taking notes:

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    Feb 12, 2017 8:49 PM GMT
    Part 2 is wonderful.



    I'm also re-reading Trend Trading for a Living
    Learn the Skills and Gain the Confidence to Trade for a Living
    by Dr. Thomas K. Carr

    I ordered John L. Person's book Mastering the Stock Market from amazon. It's published by Wiley.
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    Feb 12, 2017 8:59 PM GMT
    amazon.com review by Bookman of Market-Neutral Trading by Carr

    Also, in today's world of High Frequency Trading, any time you place an order, an HFT mafioso (tipped by the exchange for a bribe) sneaks in front of you, and before you trade, he'll buy it and re-sell it to you higher. Something like an illegal Hotel.com that takes a cut off every hotel room. The Exchanges know of this, but half their business is HFT, so tough. The SEC knows, too, but if they apply the rules, half the exchanges will go bust. So trading today has costs you don't even know.
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    Feb 12, 2017 9:16 PM GMT
    Stephenoabc: Fundamental Analysis Risk Alert

    Financial Shenanigans: How to Detect Accounting Gimmicks & Fraud in Financial Reports, 3rd Edition

    amazon book review by Don

    The book by Howard Schilit and Jeremy Perler dives deep into the dark world of corporate accounting, blowing apart common tricks corporate accountants use to make businesses look better than they are.
    The book hits hard on the many changes in GAAP accounting and how masterful accountants trick business analysts with gimmickry.

    In total there are:

    7 Earnings manipulation shenanigans – These run the gamut from simple revenue recognition discrepancies to very disingenuous sales processes that allow a company to record revenue before a sale is even made. The author boosts this section of the book with high-quality examples from leading public companies including Sunbeam and IBM. You won’t believe the extent to which high-profile companies report earnings beats with fictitious accounting numbers.

    4 Cash flow shenanigans – The cash flow statement is one of the most difficult to engineer – a company produces cash, or it doesn’t. However, accounting teams still have four methods to boost cash flows when a business would otherwise produce very little free cash. This section primarily focuses on how businesses shift financing cash flows (money from stock and bond sales) into operating income. Also, this section uncovers how acquisitions and disposition can be used to make cash flow look stronger than it really is.

    3 Key metric shenanigans – This section targets the key metrics used by executives when they talk about their business and brand. In particular, it examines how corporate brass can turn attention away from struggling businesses with non-GAAP measures like “same store sales” or “average revenue per user.” This section curiously touches on the subject of “bookings,” a metric used by recent IPOs like Groupon to hide their true revenue per user metrics. This is a must-read section for people who tune into corporate conference calls or who read conference call presentations.

    This book will also help anyone who:

    Invests in individual stocks – Particularly in large cap companies, where the sheer complexity of one or many businesses can hide the true operating performance of a company, this book gives investors a way to “fact” check the going-ons of a company from quarter to quarter. If you invest in individual stocks, this is a must-read book.

    Values stocks on cash flows – The cash flow shenanigans are absolutely incredible. Anyone who uses a discounted cash flow analysis to value companies will appreciate the wisdom in Financial Shenanigans. The cash flow statement is not as impenetrable as investors seem to believe.

    Wants to learn more about financial history – The book takes you through the evolution of corporate scams and accounting frauds. The author makes frequent references to massive scams like Enron and Worldcom, and even goes back in time to show you how investors could have caught onto the false accounting that made these companies the biggest frauds in Wall Street history.

    What I like most about the book is that it doesn’t just expose the gimmicks that businesses use to fake their financials. Instead, the authors go to great lengths to give examples, and then explain how you can fact check the accounting of any public company.

    All in all, at little more than $18 for the hardcover, this is a must-own book for any serious individual stock investor. It’s easy to read, easy to follow (there are literally hundreds of examples), and easy to apply what you learn to companies you watch immediately after reading.
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    Feb 18, 2017 8:31 PM GMT
    For a three- or four-monitor workstation, try typing in the url:

    www.digitaltigers.com .