Everyone's Diet

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    Feb 16, 2009 11:43 AM GMT
    I was wondering what everyone's diet is like, and what they have found to be the perfect nutrition plan as far as when to eat carbs/protein.

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    Feb 16, 2009 3:04 PM GMT
    My diet is almost entirely fresh fruit, vegetables, and meat. No processed foods. No polyunsaturated vegetable oils. No wheat. No dairy, except for some whey protein on gym days. Occasionally, I'll have some wild rice or beans.

    As for meal timing, the only rule I have is no meat after 5pm. I sleep best if my evening meal is easily and quickly digested, so I usually have a large bowl of salad (romaine lettuce mixed with veggies like celery, carrot, bell pepper, avocado, etc.)
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    Feb 16, 2009 4:30 PM GMT
    Personally I do best on what would be considered a very high protein/very low carb/moderate fat diet. As far as what that consists of I try to follow a paleolithic man style diet. In other words what did our bodies do well on for thousands of years, before the rapidly changed world of the last 100 years that our bodies evolution has not caught up with yet. To accomplish this it is very few processed foods, lots of chicken, fish, wild game occasionally, berries, nuts, oranges, bananas,grapes, vegetables like romaine, bell peppers, mushrooms, tomatoes, dairy, eggs, etc. I find this diet best for putting on new muscle and doing it while staying lean or even dropping body fat percentage while building muscle. I do pay close attention to nutrient timing as this is the critical factor in building muscle while staying or increasing leanness. Breakfast usually consists on some protein, some fat, and some carbs. The body handles carbs best in the AM, and in the hour or two after exercise. So I restrict my carbs to those times of day. I may have a small amount of complex carbs in the form of vegetables with dinner. Absolutely no carbs are consumed within three hours of going to bed. Protein shakes are consumed in the AM, pre-workout, and a protein/creatine/carb combo is taken post workout. Last a slow digesting protein shake is taken before bed. This regimen gives me about 1 to 1.5 grams of protein per/lb. Some people, especially long distance endurance runners will need significantly more carbs, but after a lot of food logging and analysis this is what I found to work very well for me.

  • dannyboy1101

    Posts: 977

    Feb 16, 2009 7:57 PM GMT
    YngHungSFSD saidPersonally I do best on what would be considered a very high protein/very low carb/moderate fat diet. As far as what that consists of I try to follow a paleolithic man style diet. In other words what did our bodies do well on for thousands of years, before the rapidly changed world of the last 100 years that our bodies evolution has not caught up with yet. To accomplish this it is very few processed foods, lots of chicken, fish, wild game occasionally, berries, nuts, oranges, bananas,grapes, vegetables like romaine, bell peppers, mushrooms, tomatoes, dairy, eggs, etc. I find this diet best for putting on new muscle and doing it while staying lean or even dropping body fat percentage while building muscle. I do pay close attention to nutrient timing as this is the critical factor in building muscle while staying or increasing leanness. Breakfast usually consists on some protein, some fat, and some carbs. The body handles carbs best in the AM, and in the hour or two after exercise. So I restrict my carbs to those times of day. I may have a small amount of complex carbs in the form of vegetables with dinner. Absolutely no carbs are consumed within three hours of going to bed. Protein shakes are consumed in the AM, pre-workout, and a protein/creatine/carb combo is taken post workout. Last a slow digesting protein shake is taken before bed. This regimen gives me about 1 to 1.5 grams of protein per/lb. Some people, especially long distance endurance runners will need significantly more carbs, but after a lot of food logging and analysis this is what I found to work very well for me.



    What brand(s) of protein shake do you do?
  • dannyboy1101

    Posts: 977

    Feb 16, 2009 8:02 PM GMT
    I'm actually seeing what happens for me doing Body for Life. It's basically eating 6 small meals a day with a fist sized portion of carb and protein at each meal, which falls every 2-3 hrs. I have leaned down in the month of doing it and can see more muscle definition. There's also a specific regimen of workouts/cardio, but it's good because it's a lot of high intensity work without having to be at the gym for 2+ hrs doing 10 exercises for each body part like in the "Strong and Lean" program on here.
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    Feb 17, 2009 1:09 AM GMT
    Is it bad to take a nap after a work out?

    I live in a frat, so it's hard to choose my meals since we have a cook, but I have been trying to mostly eat protein during the day. I still have the problem of eating really late at night... the sorority girls have the best late night snacks...
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    Feb 17, 2009 1:13 AM GMT
    Adnoh saidIs it bad to take a nap after a work out?

    I live in a frat, so it's hard to choose my meals since we have a cook, but I have been trying to mostly eat protein during the day. I still have the problem of eating really late at night... the sorority girls have the best late night snacks...


    Minimum six meals a day, 40g of protein for most meals for a minimum daily amount of 240g a day, 40g low-GI carbs for each meal, total amount dependent upon whether or not you see yourself getting flabby, and keep fat to a minimum but don't be afraid of fats from peanut butter or fish.

    After your workout, EAT EAT EAT. Your pre- and post-workout meals should be your biggest, both with as much as 50g of protein and 100g of carbs. I don't recommend napping because it slows your metabolism when it's at the highest point in the day (keep it HIGH, you wanna be able to use the food you're eating, not store it as fat!) Both meals you can dip into higher GI foods because you'll burn it up fast.

    You'll want to be eating more carbs early in the day (not including your pre- and post-workout meals) and keep your carb intake a little lower towards the evening at no less than 20-30g per meal, but eat more if you get "fuzzy-brain".

    Don't forget your veggies; with all that protein you'll need the fiber to keep things in motion.
  • DiverScience

    Posts: 1426

    Feb 18, 2009 3:46 PM GMT
    I'm on the healthy version of the grad student diet.

    Lot of rice, beans, veggies, some meat. 20-25$ a week.