Do you fly frequently for work?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 17, 2009 1:37 AM GMT
    Thinking about jobs after school...I'd like something where I could travel around the country (or world) for work.

    Did you or do you have a travel-intensive job? What industry was it in, or what was your general job description?
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    Feb 17, 2009 1:44 AM GMT
    I did. Finance. Headed a research department. Traveling around the world was great but around the US was hell. I loved the trips to Europe, Downunder, and South America but Asia wore me out. The west coast was not too bad. The flights to NY and Vegas were almost always hell. The US aviation system is a mess. On one trip it took me 10 hours to get from DC to RDU by plane when the trip is 4 hours in a car.

    Unless you're in sales you probably won't travel much until you reach a senior enough level. The young guys working for me always wanted to travel but there wasn't much reason for them to do so.
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    Feb 17, 2009 2:00 AM GMT
    friendormate said...On one trip it took me 10 hours to get from DC to RDU by plane when the trip is 4 hours in a car.


    ...good god
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    Feb 17, 2009 4:36 AM GMT
    When my boss heard the story he proceeded to tell me a worse one. He was trying to get to NY from Charlotte. They sat for hours on the runway and had to shut off the air conditioning to preserve fuel. It was a summer day pushing 100 degrees. They finally get clearance to leave but when they arrive in NY they are not given clearence to land. All they can do is circle. They began running low on fuel so they flew the plane BACK TO CHARLOTTE!
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    Feb 17, 2009 7:28 AM GMT
    News flash: the golden days of aviation are over.

    The jet set is nothing but a badly managed cattle car these days.

    And, um, yeah...I've had a few free trips courtesy of the airlines.
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    Feb 17, 2009 7:36 AM GMT
    I think it was Ronald Reagan who deregulated the American airlines.
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Feb 17, 2009 7:49 AM GMT
    Sjv,
    I used to travel all over icon_mad.gif. Now not as much now Thank-God!. If you love to fly, or just travel the country, or the globe --no one has done it more than my Aunt. She started as a flight attendant and for the past 15 yrs she flies corporate jets only. She still loves her job. Also flying corporate jets, allows her alot of free time in locations all over the world, and she doesn't have to deal with major delays like regular commuter airlines.

    I agree with the one post about finance. It would take sometime and experience before you do the traveling I have a buddy from college who learned a few languages and is in international finance and trade. He has a very high pressure job, if you can handle that, it might be for you.

    Good Luck in your future endeavors!!

    Keep us posted.
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    Feb 17, 2009 3:04 PM GMT
    In the late 1980s and early '90s I was a frequent flyer, over a hundred thousand commercial miles a year within the US. I flew additional miles in Army fixed-wing utility aircraft, the military equivalent of general aviation. I was basically evaluating Army units across the country, especially intensive during the first Gulf War.

    Army policy allowed me to collect frequent flyer miles, though I was not allowed to use them for personal things, like vacations, only for "enhancements" to my official travel. So I was permitted to get first-class upgrades (the govt only buys the military coach/economy fare), and buy memberships in private airline terminal lounges with my frequent flyer points.

    If you are careful about acquiring flyer points you can alleviate some of the more unpleasant aspects of air travel. Most points programs give you additional mileage credits if you rent cars from certain companies, stay in certain hotels, and use other participating services. I made sure to do all of the above.

    I was racking up so many credit miles that I flew first-class most of the time, and those "VIP" lounges are a god-send when you're waiting between flights, or encountering delays. Some lounges have complimentary drinks & snacks, Internet connections, ticket agents right on-site, and infinitely more comfortable accommodations than languishing in a terminal public waiting area.

    If you do become a frequent air traveler, you'll find there's an art to it. Living out of a suitcase like I did is still a grind, but there are ways to make it more civilized & humane. Hope your post-school plans work out for you. icon_smile.gif
  • sccrfun65

    Posts: 7

    Feb 17, 2009 4:14 PM GMT
    I have traveled all over the world with my job. Been to some amazing places that I would never have seen on my own. I have incredible experiences from my trips. Made great friends and stay in contact with them. I have been very fortunate and have never had any major problems with my travel. Travel has been reduced but I am still able to keep my platinum status - makes a big difference.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 17, 2009 4:39 PM GMT
    I too travel all over the place for work. Mostly domestic (US) but sometimes a distant international trip is there too.
    After a few months of being a "road warrior" cities start to become a bit of a blur. Now, having to travel is more inconvenient than anything else unless I am going someplace really unique.
    I have learned that if you have some advance warning you can find somebody in the destination city (through RJ or even CL if you're careful) that would be happy to show you around and I've met a lot of awesome people this way.

    If you don't have a family or obligations at home, the I recommend longer trips. It's really a lot of fun to go and live somewhere else (especially another country) for a few weeks or months at a go. I lived in Sweden for a few months back in 2000 and had a blast (until winter hit anyway). More recently I spent a couple weeks in Japan and next month I'll spend mostly in India. Then again I have a family at home and I miss my son terribly when I'm gone for more than a day or two so it's a trade off.
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    Feb 17, 2009 5:00 PM GMT
    I've cut it back a lot, the last couple of years. But there can be a lot of travel in the sciences. Travel to field sites to work, travel to meetings to talk about it, travel for review panels, etc. A lot of that is really unnecessary in the internet age, but people keep doing it.

    Most of it is not particularly appealing. Yes, I've been to cities all over the world, but one conference room looks about like any other conference room, you know? (Sometimes I watch TV reports of the economic summit in Davos, just so I can say, "Hey, I've spoken from that podium!) Longer trips do allow you to get more immersed in the locale, which can be interesting.

    Any time you're traveling for work, you are burning budget dollars at a horrendous rate. There is a strong incentive to spend every minute on-task. It's usually pretty exhausting.

    If you really enjoy traveling, being the young single guy in the department may get you more time on the road. The married guys all want to get home to the family, so the single guy gets nominated to travel. Unless it's a really cool trip, then seniority takes precedent.

    There was a time, pre-9/11 when I just kept my carry-on suitcase packed at all times. I could roll out of bed at 0515, drive to the airport, grab breakfast from the kiosk at the security gate, and walk right onto the plane in time for a 0600 flight.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 17, 2009 5:28 PM GMT
    I worked for ABC so I flew between NY and CA...too much. I hated it.

    I now work for myself as a Private Dealer in a specific antique art form only
    found in the South of France so I fly there 7/8 times a year (and then drive e slowly from Nice to Bordeaux and then up to Paris)


    I love to fly now....it helps to be loyal to one carrier and accrue higer level of membership..if you fly often..you can wind up in Business class everytime just based on adding miles to your ticket or just being upgraded.....Delta is my airline since I started the French travel...they are wonderful with their loyal members.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 17, 2009 10:18 PM GMT
    I racked up enough ff miles to spend xmas at home with my family which i couldn't otherwise afford....

    I kind of got me as I spent 4 years jetting around being treated like absolute crap in American Airlines coach, being delayed dozens of times, rerouted twice, lost my bags twice and each time standing in an endless lines to argue with customer reps who couldn't care less.

    I flew return in upper class, had the cabin nearly to myself and it felt like they would gladly lick my shoes.

    Seemed kind of hollow, guess it's the product of the recession and what not
  • boilerup_82

    Posts: 188

    Feb 17, 2009 10:37 PM GMT
    Red_Vespa saidIn the late 1980s and early '90s I was a frequent flyer, over a hundred thousand commercial miles a year within the US. I flew additional miles in Army fixed-wing utility aircraft, the military equivalent of general aviation. I was basically evaluating Army units across the country, especially intensive during the first Gulf War.

    Army policy allowed me to collect frequent flyer miles, though I was not allowed to use them for personal things, like vacations, only for "enhancements" to my official travel. So I was permitted to get first-class upgrades (the govt only buys the military coach/economy fare), and buy memberships in private airline terminal lounges with my frequent flyer points.

    If you are careful about acquiring flyer points you can alleviate some of the more unpleasant aspects of air travel. Most points programs give you additional mileage credits if you rent cars from certain companies, stay in certain hotels, and use other participating services. I made sure to do all of the above.

    I was racking up so many credit miles that I flew first-class most of the time, and those "VIP" lounges are a god-send when you're waiting between flights, or encountering delays. Some lounges have complimentary drinks & snacks, Internet connections, ticket agents right on-site, and infinitely more comfortable accommodations than languishing in a terminal public waiting area.

    If you do become a frequent air traveler, you'll find there's an art to it. Living out of a suitcase like I did is still a grind, but there are ways to make it more civilized & humane. Hope your post-school plans work out for you. icon_smile.gif



    i agree, Lounge access at airports is GOLD! I first got elite access in 2006 with Continental. I loved it, complimentary upgrades, extra mileage bonuses, etc. The Last two years I've had elite status with UA and getting lounge access is so nice. I dont think I want to go back to being normal flyer!


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    Feb 17, 2009 10:40 PM GMT
    redheadguy saidI think it was Ronald Reagan who deregulated the American airlines.


    Actually no, it was Jimmy Carter who signed the Airline Deregulation Act in 1978.