Athletes, Once Apolitical, Now Criticize Wrongs Without Penalty

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 28, 2017 2:22 AM GMT
    NYT: When it came to wading deeper into sociopolitical issues, many of the most prominent athletes — like Michael Jordan, Tiger Woods and Derek Jeter — preferred staying, in Mr. Steinberg’s terms, “scrupulously apolitical.” The reason was often financial. As Mr. Jordan famously, or perhaps apocryphally, contended, “Republicans buy sneakers, too.”

    But this month, Stephen Curry, the N.B.A.’s marquee attraction, effectively ditched that notion like a pair of old sneakers. In an act that some might once have considered commercial suicide, he criticized the chief executive of his own sneaker brand, Under Armour, for complimenting President Trump.

    After Under Armour’s C.E.O., Kevin Plank, described Mr. Trump’s pro-business approach as “a real asset” to the country, Mr. Curry told The San Jose Mercury News, “I agree with that description, if you remove the ‘et.’” He later said he would not be afraid to leave any company “if it wasn’t in line with who I am.”

    The reaction was forceful — in support of Mr. Curry. Other Under Armour endorsers, like the movie star Dwayne Johnson, also known as the Rock, and the ballerina Misty Copeland, released their own critical statements aimed at Mr. Plank. One analyst downgraded Under Armour’s stock price target, to $14 from $24 per share. And on Feb. 15, Mr. Plank took out a full-page ad in The Baltimore Sun saying, in part, that his comments “did not accurately reflect my intent.”

    An Under Armour spokeswoman said that Mr. Plank had since spoken to Mr. Curry, Mr. Johnson and Ms. Copeland and “they all understand the context in which those comments were made.”

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/26/business/media/advertising-celebrities-activism.html?_r=0
  • NealJohn

    Posts: 345

    Feb 28, 2017 10:28 PM GMT
    Let's see. An uneducated athlete, worthless in all things outside his sport. An ethnic, steroid abusing Hollywood actor, and an anorexic ballerina. My one question is this, who gives a **** about what they think? The CEO of under armor is an educated and accomplished man in the field of business, and I would take what he has to say about the economy with more seriousness than what any of the aforementioned rejects have to say. And that is all I have to say on the matter. May God bless America
  • rip12

    Posts: 96

    Mar 01, 2017 12:59 AM GMT
    here we go again - call it fake news? or whatever floats your boat

    the downgrade of under armour had absolutely nothing to do with planks comments but, of course, this is lost in all the chatter

    ignorance is bliss i suppose - but its scary!!
  • stratavos

    Posts: 1869

    Mar 01, 2017 3:17 AM GMT
    rip12 saidhere we go again - call it fake news? or whatever floats your boat

    the downgrade of under armour had absolutely nothing to do with planks comments but, of course, this is lost in all the chatter

    ignorance is bliss i suppose - but its scary!!


    I was interested in buying their gear when it was still aimed at atheletes... but it's aimed at everyone now.

    Wasn't that part of how adidias fell out of favour?

    No wait, that was from the knockoff and chavs...
  • Ubeaut

    Posts: 241

    Nov 16, 2017 8:08 AM GMT
    Sport hasn't ever been apolitical.
    it was a surrogate for war in the times of the Greek polis states. Many sports in Italy commemorate battles between city states, There are sporting commemorations of the wars between Muslim and Christian in Spain.Various forms of sport have been spread by empire.

    In my lifetime I've seen the Black Power salutes at the Mexico Olympics, sporting boycotts of apartheid era South Africa, the USA boycotted the Moscow Olympics because of Soviet intervention in Afghanistan (how ironic is that one), we've seen the Olympic movement turn on the gay Olympics, Mackle more performing same love at a Football grand final in Sydney...

    Sport and politics are habitual bedfellows.
  • Triggerman

    Posts: 611

    Nov 18, 2017 1:45 AM GMT
    I think every athlete has the right to speak about anything. I also agree that any team owner has the right to react in anyway he/she feels. It's not courageous if there are no consequences. Ali is a classic example. Said what he wanted to say, paid a price. Kaepernick, did what he wanted, paid a price, though he had a contract and chose to walk away from it. Freedom to speak your mind, awesome. But risk is inherent. Willing to risk millions for what you believe is right? More power to you. Whine when you suffer the consequences? Immature. Professional sport is a business.