Anyone Have Any Family Food Traditions, or Now For Themselves, Especially on Sundays?

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    Mar 19, 2017 9:04 PM GMT
    We did: on Sunday it was often baked ham, or a roast. The latter sometimes done on a large rotisserie in our family kitchen in the 1950s.

    The reason it struck me was I made myself a little Virginia ham today. And my husband had some ham steak for breakfast. I actually selected it in the store for him a couple days ago; for once he wasn't sure what to choose when it came to a breakfast ham. I told him which one was the best thickness & size, good price, and to avoid the smoked ham, less healthy.

    He had it with fried eggs (cooked without oil or butter), out on the patio while he read the Sunday paper. He loved it. But we were each fending for ourselves today, so we made our own meals. Having had a big breakfast he skipped lunch, not sure what dinner will be. I seldom eat breakfast and so simply made lunch for myself.

    Anyway, we had these family routines, and his family had theirs primarily with Italian food. Holidays had their own imperatives. US Thanksgiving & Christmas were roast turkey with stuffing, Easter usually a baked ham. We just had RJ threads about corned beef & cabbage on St. Patrick's Day, and we did that, too. Summer was cooking & eating outdoors, weather permitting, even on weekdays. Classic steak, hot dogs & hamburgers, corn on the cob, along with thin-sliced "cold cuts" of ham and roast beef. And cold sides that required no cooking.

    What were, and today are, your own traditions & routines?
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    Mar 20, 2017 1:58 AM GMT
    Well, I got my answer to what he would have for dinner tonight: homemade chicken soup and a fruit smoothie he made. I saw him warming the previously-made soup, but the smoothie was a surprise I hadn't seen him preparing. I just now noticed the empty blender accessory for smoothies in the sink.

    But both are good items for his losing weight. I had nothing, even better for my losing weight. Well, actually I was munching, not on junk food but healthy. Gotta make my body THINK I'm eating, so it doesn't shut down to conserve calories.

    I guess our newest family tradition would be eating as little as possible. And making at least a half-way attempt to choose what's reasonably healthy.
  • MuchoMasQueMu...

    Posts: 436

    Mar 21, 2017 9:24 AM GMT
    On Easter Sunday I make a phenomenal salmon and asparagus paella with crumbled hard-boiled egg on top. The dish has capers and plenty of freshly minced dill along with the usual saffron added as a staple. It truly is wonderful.

    I've made it for my family for years and now have made it for my partner for the past two Easters we've been together. He seems to love it too. icon_wink.gif
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    Mar 21, 2017 11:31 AM GMT
    The past few years, we've actively avoided anything even remotely Easter-ish on Easter Sunday...

    It was an Easter Dinner that my guy wound up coming out to his family... and it became the start of the worst week and darkest moment of his life.

    We now do our own thing that's anything except a big dinner... we've done movies, traveled to NYC for the weekend, and of course, spend a night or two reminding each other of just how great we are together... icon_cool.gif
  • Ubeaut

    Posts: 144

    Mar 21, 2017 12:39 PM GMT
    Pizzas are a family tradition for Friday Night.
    Sundays I cook for the week ahead. Then I go to the pub to catch up with my local bears club. So Sunday dinner is a reheated something I've cooked during the day. Often chilli beans or a curry or a paella. In summer that'll have a salad with it.

    Back in the days when I used to eat meat I'd slow braise rabbit for Easter.
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    Mar 21, 2017 2:45 PM GMT
    The African-American "Sunday Dinner" has been the focus of many tv shows, movies and so on. Basically it's Thanksgiving dinner with chicken instead of turkey and no cranberry sauce. You will get the "itis" and sleep for the rest of the day.
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    Mar 21, 2017 3:09 PM GMT
    We eat daal bati on Sunday for lunch and something non-vegetarian (usually chicken) for dinner.
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    Mar 21, 2017 4:24 PM GMT
    Ubeaut said
    Pizzas are a family tradition for Friday Night.
    Sundays I cook for the week ahead. Then I go to the pub to catch up with my local bears club. So Sunday dinner is a reheated something I've cooked during the day. Often chilli beans or a curry or a paella. In summer that'll have a salad with it.

    Back in the days when I used to eat meat I'd slow braise rabbit for Easter.

    Pizza Friday night! Yes, for years when I was a kid. My Father's supermarkets were only open late that one night in the week, and closed Sundays, typical in the 1950s. So he'd get home after 9:30, but no dinner was made earlier at home, awaiting him. My sister & I got to stay up late, since Saturday wasn't a school day.

    He'd stop by a pizza shop on his way home. Being Roman Catholics we couldn't eat meat on Friday in that era. So he ordered anchovies as a topping, to give it some extra protein. I love anchovies to this day, although I realize many don't. It's still the way I prefer my pizza.

    We'd wait for him to come through the door, and run to give him a big hug. He'd be carrying the pizza, that we didn't dare touch until he was finished. Because now he had to go back out to the car and bring in about 5 brown paper bags full of groceries.

    He did the weekly grocery shopping from one of his stores, while my Mother and him would buy fresh things throughout the week, from local delis or his stores. Frozen foods were just being introduced into American homes, and kitchen refrigerator design began to reflect that change.

    He'd set the 5 or 6 paper bags on the kitchen table, and then tell us kids, very seriously: "You see all this food? It cost nearly 20 dollars! Don't waste it!" "Wow, Dad!" We were so impressed, when $20 was like a fortune to a kid back then.

    How times have changed. My husband & I go grocery shopping, and I'm grateful if we stay under $200, never mind $20.

    After that we'd eat the pizza, watch a little more "grown-up" TV and then we'd be sent to bed.

    Thanks for refreshing some fond memories for me. icon_biggrin.gif
  • MuchoMasQueMu...

    Posts: 436

    Mar 22, 2017 4:17 AM GMT
    My current Sunday tradition is eating salmon burgers with my partner and we watch a couple shows on Netflix. We get the burgers frozen from Costco. He has two and I have three. icon_biggrin.gif They're really tasty and are better than anything I can make from scratch. We do a stir fry of vegetables as a side dish and enjoy our shows and meal at the same time.
  • GoodPup

    Posts: 781

    Apr 16, 2017 11:38 PM GMT
    My family always had a big pasta meal on Sunday's after church... unless we are out.
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    Apr 17, 2017 7:52 PM GMT
    GoodPup said
    My family always had a big pasta meal on Sunday's after church... unless we are out.

    Our ordinary Sunday routine in the winter was to go out to a fancy restaurant about mid-afternoon. My Father & me in coat & tie (although I was just a pre-teen), my Mother and younger sister in dresses.

    A drink cart would be wheeled up to our booth, and my parents would have cocktails. My sister & I would be served Shirley Temples, in martini glasses. Kids got indoctrinated early into the drinking culture of the 1950s.

    In the summer, though, we ate a lot outdoors on Sundays, weather permitting. Sorta backyard picnic style. My Father had a BBQ built, with a chimney. And he also had park-style tables & benches custom made. I suppose he liked that casual family atmosphere.

    And my sister & I were in the swimming pool, and on the swing set & slide, or maybe playing badminton (we never had a tennis court) or croquet, waiting for the food to be ready.

    Obviously I kinda miss all that. Didn't do anything like that on this Sunday.

    Still, I have my adult pleasures. Yesterday we had Easter dinner at home. Lovely. These days I count my blessings where I find them.
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    Apr 18, 2017 5:26 AM GMT
    GoodPup said
    My family always had a big pasta meal on Sunday's after church... unless we are out.

    That sounds like my husband's Italian family, in the Boston area. Are you Italian?
  • two_meninlove

    Posts: 1656

    Apr 18, 2017 10:21 AM GMT
    Our main meal for the day together is lunch now day's.
    Sunday lunch can be, Brittish, American, Japanese , Italian, Indian, Mexican, fresh Seafood, or simply A BBQ.
    Whatever I feel like cooking. It's never the same every Sunday.
    I enjoy good food to much for that.
    Melbourne is also not only the best City in Australia to eat out in. But......... also, one of the best in the world.
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    Apr 18, 2017 12:59 PM GMT
    Sundays was always roast beast, mashed potatoes, gravy, vegetables and salad with oil and vinegar dressing.
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4641

    Apr 18, 2017 3:45 PM GMT
    Beef Wellington was our traditional Christmas Eve dinner. Mom would make the pate from scratch as well as the pastry, no overwhelming duxelle sauce. Then a cake she learned to make from Sardi's of meringue, whipped cream, strawberries and chocolate. The extended family would sit down coat and tie in the dining room with silver and candles and the best of everything we had. After dinner, fruit, cheese and white wine in the living room while my sister lit the candles on the tree. Every year. One present then off to midnight mass at the Episcopal church. I'm an atheist and mom and dad are long gone (as well as mom's recipe for the Wellington) but I still try to do formal dinner on Christmas Eve followed by midnight mass. Wherever in the World I find myself. Last year it was Hong Kong and we were there for the Church of England high mass at midnight after a formal dinner. Nice to have one evening that you know will be formal at least once per year. Food should match.
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    Apr 18, 2017 7:50 PM GMT
    bon_pan said
    Sundays was always roast beast, mashed potatoes, gravy, vegetables and salad with oil and vinegar dressing.

    Pretty much same with us. At least during the colder months, and excluding the holidays, that had their own special menus.

    In the summer we often ate outdoors in the back yard, picnic style. Or at the country club. Where I liked to go to play tennis on weekends, after I became a teen. Before I could drive (age 17 in New Jersey), I sometimes pedaled my bike alone, the 12 miles there over hilly country back roads.

    But being on my own, my Saturday or Sunday meal was often a hot dog from the poolside snack bar. I despised hamburgers, still do. I would never have a sit-down meal by myself.

    Not until years later, in the Army. When I could have a nice gin martini with a steak (off-post when I was enlisted, later in the Officer's Club).

    But I always remembered those family holiday meals. When my sister & I were very young we ate in a kitchen alcove, at a low table with chairs for our size. We couldn't join the adults in the dining room.

    My sister & I had small plates on our little table, and small-scaled tableware suitable to our size. It was a big step when I turned 13, and I was allowed to sit with the adults at the dining room table, for meals like Easter or Thanksgiving.

    And aside from ham on Easter, turkey on Thanksgiving & Christmas, BBQ on July 4th, the tradition was we kids ate in the kitchen until we became teens. A rite of passage in my family.