Sorry guys, science confirms ‘gaydar’ isn’t real

  • metta

    Posts: 41709

    Mar 20, 2017 3:44 AM GMT
    Sorry guys, science confirms ‘gaydar’ isn’t real


    https://www.queerty.com/sorry-guys-science-confirms-gaydar-isnt-real-20170318
  • NealJohn

    Posts: 277

    Mar 20, 2017 12:09 PM GMT
    Because science is the final authority..... I can tell you from experience that " gaydar" is very real.
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    Mar 20, 2017 12:55 PM GMT
    I knew former twice married NJ Governor Jim McGreevey was gay when I met him in 1998 while he was Woodbridge Mayor. He didn't out himself until 2004. It was sustained eye contact, not mannerisms. The question is, will Cory Booker come out of the closet before he runs for President.
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    Mar 20, 2017 5:56 PM GMT
    Never worked very well for me...
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 20, 2017 6:25 PM GMT
    I agree that the idea of gay detection may be a myth...
    But there is no denying that there are some guys that broadcast it on more than one channel...
    icon_lol.gif
  • two_meninlove

    Posts: 1939

    Mar 20, 2017 6:40 PM GMT
    Mine must be broken.
    Or one doesn't take enough notice.
    Albeit there are those, that one doesn't even have to think about it to know.
    Even a blind man could see it.
  • Eleven

    Posts: 335

    Mar 20, 2017 8:19 PM GMT
    Then why is mine never wrong?

    I can even tell if someone is a closeted tranny
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    Mar 20, 2017 9:23 PM GMT
    If gaydar is a myth then so would be the concept of mutual attraction for everyone including heterosexuals.
  • Buddha

    Posts: 1810

    Mar 20, 2017 10:54 PM GMT
    Very misleading, the study found that stereotypes don't always correlate to sexuality. I don't really have a 'gaydar' myself and I can certainly understand that people from different cultures can in other cultures be construed as flirting when they are not; but having that said, sensing a sexual connection with someone is what I could also call a gaydar and can be caught up by other things than just pure stereotypical interests. A gaydar could also be that you catch someone checking you out, or feeling mutual attraction through smell or whatever.
  • you_know_Its_...

    Posts: 311

    Mar 20, 2017 11:18 PM GMT
    I'm tempted to walk around downtown asking everyone if they're gay or straight, just to "recalibrate" my gaydar.
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    Mar 21, 2017 12:30 AM GMT
    Eleven said
    Then why is mine never wrong?

    I can even tell if someone is a closeted tranny

    Nor mine seldom wrong? And mine's not based on stereotypes. I think that may be a flaw in how this scientific "study" was constructed. Wouldn't be the first time a study was seriously flawed.

    An obvious stereotype is too... obvious. Guys with gaydar are responding to subtle clues & hints that most straight people would never detect. And not some other gays, either.

    And you don't have to go through a checklist when you see a guy. You almost immediately know, or suspect. It's like instinctual.

    I call it the hunter's instinct. When you're a single gay, in "hunt mode" as I termed it, you just know. Primitive peoples have that skill, when hunting game.

    They can read the most subtle signs, that a city boy like me never could. But then their survival depended upon that skill. I didn't need such a skill for my food.

    For some gays, gaydar is that survival skill. And they have it, and develop it. I know I did.

    I just find this study seriously flawed. It appears to have started with certain straight assumptions about gays, that skewed the results. Someone should try again with a clean sheet of paper.
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    Mar 21, 2017 5:45 AM GMT
    Thought that my "gaydar" was broken. Feel better now knowing that it wasn't a real thing.
  • two_meninlove

    Posts: 1939

    Mar 21, 2017 8:36 AM GMT
    art_deco said
    Eleven said
    Then why is mine never wrong?

    I can even tell if someone is a closeted tranny

    Nor mine seldom wrong? And mine's not based on stereotypes. I think that may be a flaw in how this scientific "study" was constructed. Wouldn't be the first time a study was seriously flawed.

    An obvious stereotype is too... obvious. Guys with gaydar are responding to subtle clues & hints that most straight people would never detect. And not some other gays, either.

    And you don't have to go through a checklist when you see a guy. You almost immediately know, or suspect. It's like instinctual.

    I call it the hunter's instinct. When you're a single gay, in "hunt mode" as I termed it, you just know. Primitive peoples have that skill, when hunting game.

    They can read the most subtle signs, that a city boy like me never could. But then their survival depended upon that skill. I didn't need such a skill for my food.

    For some gays, gaydar is that survival skill. And they have it, and develop it. I know I did.

    I just find this study seriously flawed. It appears to have started with certain straight assumptions about gays, that skewed the results. Someone should try again with a clean sheet of paper.

    But yours never went ping for yourself; lmfao.
    After you informing one, you don'tknow a gay man like me.
    One has little doubt, you box everyone into one stereotype or another.
    Feel you've just come the raw prawn again, half brother.
  • MuchoMasQueMu...

    Posts: 513

    Mar 21, 2017 9:21 AM GMT
    I always thought "gaydar" was more of an intuitive feeling. Reading up on a guy and seeing that he likes fashion (as per the article provided in the OP) isn't gaydar. That's coming to a conclusion based on information related to stereotypes.

    When a man looks me in the eye I can almost always tell if he's part of the tribe, or not.
  • bro4bro

    Posts: 1478

    Mar 21, 2017 7:27 PM GMT
    Wow, this is the most flawed psychological study I've ever heard of - and that's saying something!

    The entire study consisted of reading guys' social media profiles and trying to figure out if they're gay or straight.

    That is not gaydar.

    In order for gaydar to work, you actually have to be in close proximity to a living, breathing person.

    These researchers really need to get out of the house more.
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    Mar 21, 2017 9:34 PM GMT
    MuchoMasQueMusculo said
    I always thought "gaydar" was more of an intuitive feeling. Reading up on a guy and seeing that he likes fashion (as per the article provided in the OP) isn't gaydar. That's coming to a conclusion based on information related to stereotypes.

    When a man looks me in the eye I can almost always tell if he's part of the tribe, or not.

    Agree. And that's what this "study" fails to take into account. I know that, you know that, many guys here know that, but evidently these "scientists" don't know that.

    Who CAN'T recognize that a flaming, swishy guy is likely gay? Gaydar is seeing a butch-looking guy, who exhibits no gay stereotypical behavior or outward appearance, and still know he's gay. Now how did these "scientific" researchers build their study to consider that?

    Answer: they didn't. And I'd like to know who funded this, who was behind it, and what the backgrounds of the researchers were.
  • two_meninlove

    Posts: 1939

    Mar 21, 2017 10:04 PM GMT
    art_deco said
    MuchoMasQueMusculo said
    I always thought "gaydar" was more of an intuitive feeling. Reading up on a guy and seeing that he likes fashion (as per the article provided in the OP) isn't gaydar. That's coming to a conclusion based on information related to stereotypes.

    When a man looks me in the eye I can almost always tell if he's part of the tribe, or not.

    Agree. And that's what this "study" fails to take into account. I know that, you know that, many guys here know that, but evidently these "scientists" don't know that.

    Who CAN'T recognize that a flaming, swishy guy is likely gay? Gaydar is seeing a butch-looking guy, who exhibits no gay stereotypical behavior or outward appearance, and still know he's gay. Now how did these "scientific" researchers build their study to consider that?

    Answer: they didn't. And I'd like to know who funded this, who was behind it, and what the backgrounds of the researchers were.

    Yet your alleged gaydar, never went ping at you?
    Oh my, the complexities of bisexuality.
  • jaxsurfer

    Posts: 86

    Mar 22, 2017 12:07 AM GMT
    Queerty is a clickbait site, gaydar most certainly exists. Whether you've ever developed it or not is up to you. Basic law enforcement profiling tactics have proved for decades of its existence. Body language 101.
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    Mar 22, 2017 12:24 AM GMT
    Odin said
    Yet your alleged gaydar, never went ping at you?
    Oh my, the complexities of bisexuality.

    Actually it did go ping, my non-brother. But I dismissed it.

    Based on the stereotypes of my generation for gay. I lacked most of them, so gay wasn't a possibility. I loved the outdoors, living a rough life - camping, fishing, boating, before I was a teenager. How could that be gay? I was happiest outdoors in the woods, not indoors.

    I got my first derailleur bicycle in 1962. When those were rare in the US, the land of tanky Schwinns. And I used it to ride 60 miles or more on the weekends, solo out into the countryside. Starting when I was just 13. Not very gay.

    I began to play tennis at 14, becoming our club's champion in my age group. Also not conforming to a gay stereotype.

    Then I bought a motorcycle. With the money I earned myself, because my parents wouldn't buy one for me. They got me a new car on my 17th birthday, legal driving age in our State, but no motorcycle. So I bought one myself, after I became 18, making it legal. I'd already gotten my motorcycle license behind my parents' backs when 17 using a friend's bike for the State test.

    Then I attended a trade school for over a year. Becoming a certified Master Auto Mechanic. I promptly enlisted in the US Army. Becoming a Motor Sergeant. Later taking a commission as an Officer. All my life has been this dichotomy - am I blue collar or white collar? I can be comfortable in either world.

    But none of these things said gay to me. I was still bound by the stereotypes of the 1950s. I thought at times I might be gay, on top of my disinterest in girls, but my life history told me I couldn't be. I didn't match the stereotype.

    Stupid me, stupid stereotype. Yeah, I was always gay. My parents always knew it, but chose not to tell me, as I later learned. I guess I wasn't as outwardly butch as I thought myself to be.

    Now you wanna rub this failing in some more? Call me bisexual, which I'm not, or your half-brother? (I'd rather slit my wrists than be any kind of brother to you)

    But then, this site can only have one Bona Fide Homosexual on it, that you claim to be. I guess the rest of us are just wannabes. In the meantime, I'll just live my gay life happily as I am. icon_biggrin.gif
  • Ubeaut

    Posts: 155

    Mar 23, 2017 10:50 AM GMT
    I doubt if my gaydar works any better than random guesses, lots of false positives, lots of false negatives. So I just take longer to get to know someone to get a better picture.
  • JackNNJ

    Posts: 1252

    Mar 23, 2017 1:49 PM GMT
    Does science confirm this?

    “First, stereotyping can facilitate prejudice,” Cox explains. “They can justify discrimination and oppression, and, for members of stereotyped groups, they can even lead to depression and other mental health problems. Encouraging stereotyping under the guise of gaydar contributes–directly or indirectly–to stereotyping’s downstream consequences.”

    What a fucking cuck.

    LMAO @ "COX"
  • Muskelprotz

    Posts: 1803

    Mar 25, 2017 3:27 AM GMT
    metta said Sorry guys, science confirms ‘gaydar’ isn’t real


    https://www.queerty.com/sorry-guys-science-confirms-gaydar-isnt-real-20170318


    Then neither is climate change.

  • mwolverine

    Posts: 4551

    Mar 25, 2017 2:53 PM GMT
    You have to distinguish between gaydar and GSP. icon_smile.gif

    MuchoMasQueMusculo saidI always thought "gaydar" was more of an intuitive feeling. Reading up on a guy and seeing that he likes fashion (as per the article provided in the OP) isn't gaydar. That's coming to a conclusion based on information related to stereotypes.

    When a man looks me in the eye I can almost always tell if he's part of the tribe, or not.
  • nice_chap

    Posts: 435

    Mar 25, 2017 8:17 PM GMT
    bro4bro saidWow, this is the most flawed psychological study I've ever heard of - and that's saying something!

    The entire study consisted of reading guys' social media profiles and trying to figure out if they're gay or straight.

    That is not gaydar.

    In order for gaydar to work, you actually have to be in close proximity to a living, breathing person.

    These researchers really need to get out of the house more.


    Exactly. All this article mentions is a bunch of interests listed on a profile page. There's more to guessing/detecting a person's sexuality than that. What about the sound of their voice? The way they move? The way they look at other men? the way they act around women? The way they react to a joke or respond to an insult? You don't get that from studying a facebook page.
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    Mar 25, 2017 9:15 PM GMT
    nice_chap said
    bro4bro said
    Wow, this is the most flawed psychological study I've ever heard of - and that's saying something!

    The entire study consisted of reading guys' social media profiles and trying to figure out if they're gay or straight.

    That is not gaydar.

    In order for gaydar to work, you actually have to be in close proximity to a living, breathing person.

    These researchers really need to get out of the house more.

    Exactly. All this article mentions is a bunch of interests listed on a profile page. There's more to guessing/detecting a person's sexuality than that. What about the sound of their voice? The way they move? The way they look at other men? the way they act around women? The way they react to a joke or respond to an insult? You don't get that from studying a facebook page.

    Both posts beautifully stated.

    It's a thousand subtle clues you get from a guy. From a living, breathing person. As posted above. Not from an online profile alone. Which can even be invented. It's not pyschic, it's not magical, but rather extreme atunement to those signals.

    I tend to know who's a gay guy when I meet him. In person. I remember when my gay mentor, right after I came out, told me about gaydar.

    And I said: "What's special about that? I've always known who's gay or not." "DUH", he replied. "Most straight people can't do that, unless the guy is super flaming. What does that tell you about yourself?"

    His contention was that it's a built-in instinct, a skill that comes with the territory. I'm not entirely sure about that. But I think it's certainly refined when we need that skill, to locate other gays when the need arises. Following the hunter analogy I used above.

    You develop & perfect the skills you need, for your purpose. Today, having a partner for 10 years, I've let those skills grow cold myself. I'm not on "the hunt" anymore.

    It's only of passing interest to me who's gay, but not essential information. My "instinct", if that's what it is, has faded. But it's still pretty accurate, if not as sharp as it once was. Well, as the saying goes: "Use it or lose it."