Common painkillers linked to increased risk of heart attack, study says

  • metta

    Posts: 44441

    May 10, 2017 5:48 AM GMT
    Common painkillers linked to increased risk of heart attack, study says
    "The findings are observational and based on an association, however, with the drugs not proved to be a a direct cause of heart attack.
    This group of drugs includes ibuprofen, diclofenac, celecoxib and naproxen, which are available over the counter or by prescription for higher doses, to relieve pain or fever resulting from a range of causes, including flu, headaches, back pain and menstrual cramps."

    "We found that all common NSAIDs shared a heightened risk of heart attack,"

    "But the level of risk declined, on average, when the drugs were used for longer than one month.
    "This is relative to not taking these drugs, your baseline risk," Bally said. "The risk is not 75%. It's an increase (maybe) from a tiny baseline risk that they have."
    Millions of these pills are sold every year, Bally said. "Therefore the risk, no matter how small or relative, is important to note from a population viewpoint."



    http://www.cnn.com/2017/05/09/health/nsaids-ibuprofen-drugs-heart-attack-study/
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 10, 2017 2:29 PM GMT
    metta saidCommon painkillers linked to increased risk of heart attack, study says
    "The findings are observational and based on an association, however, with the drugs not proved to be a a direct cause of heart attack.
    This group of drugs includes ibuprofen, diclofenac, celecoxib and naproxen, which are available over the counter or by prescription for higher doses, to relieve pain or fever resulting from a range of causes, including flu, headaches, back pain and menstrual cramps."

    "We found that all common NSAIDs shared a heightened risk of heart attack,"

    "But the level of risk declined, on average, when the drugs were used for longer than one month.
    "This is relative to not taking these drugs, your baseline risk," Bally said. "The risk is not 75%. It's an increase (maybe) from a tiny baseline risk that they have."
    Millions of these pills are sold every year, Bally said. "Therefore the risk, no matter how small or relative, is important to note from a population viewpoint."

    http://www.cnn.com/2017/05/09/health/nsaids-ibuprofen-drugs-heart-attack-study/

    I've discussed ibuprofen with my orthopedic surgeon. At times I've got a lot of joint pain from arthritis. I can be prescribed opioids for it, but told my doctor I don't like them. As this article notes people fear addiction from them. And I don't wanna become hooked like Rush Limbaugh and some other prominent people have.

    Plus I told him they really don't help my pain much, they disrupt my sleep, and I sometimes have stomach cramps, especially in the morning. Ibuprofen works better, and I can get it everywhere off the shelf. He agreed that's what I should do. That was before this report came out, however.

    But I use even ibuprofen sparingly, only when I really need it. A little pain doesn't kill me. And I know it's tough on the stomach, plus I don't wanna lessen its efficacy when I do really need it by taking it all the time.

    Now this study suggests (but doesn't clearly establish) that it can carry cardiac risks, as well. I usually only take it for about 2-3 days, usually enough to quiet my arthritis enough. So I presume my cardiac risk isn't especially high. Given my alternate choices with opioids, at this point I'll stick with using ibuprofen in the manner that I do.
  • trvlmscl

    Posts: 190

    May 11, 2017 1:23 AM GMT
    art_deco said
    metta saidCommon painkillers linked to increased risk of heart attack, study says
    "The findings are observational and based on an association, however, with the drugs not proved to be a a direct cause of heart attack.
    This group of drugs includes ibuprofen, diclofenac, celecoxib and naproxen, which are available over the counter or by prescription for higher doses, to relieve pain or fever resulting from a range of causes, including flu, headaches, back pain and menstrual cramps."

    "We found that all common NSAIDs shared a heightened risk of heart attack,"

    "But the level of risk declined, on average, when the drugs were used for longer than one month.
    "This is relative to not taking these drugs, your baseline risk," Bally said. "The risk is not 75%. It's an increase (maybe) from a tiny baseline risk that they have."
    Millions of these pills are sold every year, Bally said. "Therefore the risk, no matter how small or relative, is important to note from a population viewpoint."

    http://www.cnn.com/2017/05/09/health/nsaids-ibuprofen-drugs-heart-attack-study/

    I've discussed ibuprofen with my orthopedic surgeon. At times I've got a lot of joint pain from arthritis. I can be prescribed opioids for it, but told my doctor I don't like them. As this article notes people fear addiction from them. And I don't wanna become hooked like Rush Limbaugh and some other prominent people have.

    Plus I told him they really don't help my pain much, they disrupt my sleep, and I sometimes have stomach cramps, especially in the morning. Ibuprofen works better, and I can get it everywhere off the shelf. He agreed that's what I should do. That was before this report came out, however.

    But I use even ibuprofen sparingly, only when I really need it. A little pain doesn't kill me. And I know it's tough on the stomach, plus I don't wanna lessen its efficacy when I do really need it by taking it all the time.

    Now this study suggests (but doesn't clearly establish) that it can carry cardiac risks, as well. I usually only take it for about 2-3 days, usually enough to quiet my arthritis enough. So I presume my cardiac risk isn't especially high. Given my alternate choices with opioids, at this point I'll stick with using ibuprofen in the manner that I do.


    Hey Art, have you tried Harlequin or Blackberry Kush? I'm pretty sure Florida passed medical last year ;)

    F*ck the pharmaceutical monsters.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 11, 2017 9:25 PM GMT
    "We found that all common NSAIDs shared a heightened risk of heart attack,"

    The article is inaccurate. The most common nsaid is Aspirin.

    Medications given to treat a heart attack include:

    Aspirin. The 911 operator may instruct you to take aspirin, or emergency medical personnel may give you aspirin immediately. Aspirin reduces blood clotting, thus helping maintain blood flow through a narrowed artery:

    http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/heart-attack/basics/treatment/con-20019520

    Duh, if you go to the emergency room with a suspected heart attack, they start treatment by giving you a baby aspirin. I've seen this with 3 relatives.

    Whom to believe, the Clinton News Network or the Mayo Clinic.