Sauna Question

  • Willingshy

    Posts: 15

    Jun 05, 2017 12:25 AM GMT
    Is it normal to feel exhausted after sitting in a sauna after a workout?
  • ChicagoSteve

    Posts: 1598

    Jun 05, 2017 12:40 AM GMT
    Willingshy saidIs it normal to feel exhausted after sitting in a sauna after a workout?


    Maybe you are just feeling relaxed from the effects of the sauna. I usually go to the steam room, and sometimes the sauna after a workout. It helps to soothe your muscles and relax your mind.

  • Jun 05, 2017 9:59 AM GMT
    Not how I thought this was going to go when I saw the title...
  • Element1313

    Posts: 152

    Jun 05, 2017 11:38 AM GMT

    Hyperthermic conditioning

    https://youtu.be/aHOlM-wlNjM
  • bro4bro

    Posts: 2098

    Jun 05, 2017 4:01 PM GMT
    Yes, it's normal to feel exhausted. It's called dehydration.
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    Jun 05, 2017 4:31 PM GMT
    bro4bro saidYes, it's normal to feel exhausted. It's called dehydration.


    + Correct, so the question are you hydrating or intaking some liquids prior to going into the Sauna. I know some do not allow liquids while you go in, other do...so best is to drinks lots of water before and after.
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4913

    Jun 05, 2017 4:56 PM GMT
    You might also need to replenish your electrolytes which is nothing more than your salt reserves. But the idea is you sweat out waste fluids and intake fresh fluids. Don't be fooled by sugary drinks like Gatorade that talk about electrolytes-- just take a sodium chloride pill and drink lots of water. You may be just sitting there but your body is doing healthy, hard work internally.
  • toybrian

    Posts: 409

    Jun 05, 2017 5:13 PM GMT
    yes it is normal because your body is settling down after your hard work and catching up to you.
    Agree with others and drink plenty of liquids before you go in or will feel light-headed while in
    there.
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    Jun 06, 2017 1:08 PM GMT
    Element1313 said
    Hyperthermic conditioning

    https://youtu.be/aHOlM-wlNjM


    Thank you for posting this video.
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    Jun 06, 2017 5:36 PM GMT
    I love sauna. After a workout it seems to lessen muscle stiffness. When I lived up north, and often got winter head colds for a week or two, using the sauna evidently reduced their incidence. I subsequently read that breathing the hot sauna air (above 105 F) can kill the rhino (nose) virus, a source of the common head cold.

    Maybe just a coincidence, maybe my imagination. Certainly not scientific medical proof. And perhaps with age I was gaining immunities, against the miserable head colds that used to plague me all winter. But I know what apparently worked for me, and made me feel better. No head colds, no muscle aches. For me, not a bad deal. icon_biggrin.gif
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    Jun 07, 2017 9:37 AM GMT
    You should not sit in the Sauna till the heat becomes unbearable. It is just to detox, let the muscles relax after a workout and let the skin pores do some sweating. If you sit there too long you will experience heat exhaustion. Which is not what the Sauna is made for.
  • Derrick_Rigg

    Posts: 68

    Aug 01, 2017 12:43 PM GMT
    I have done wet and dry saunas.

    Dry saunas I use for maybe five minutes after a workout to get a little relaxation and then I'm headed out the door.

    Wet saunas benefit me when my back or leg muscles are tight and need relaxing. I have laid on my back in the wet saunas and have benefited from wet heat. I'll maybe stay in for 15 minutes. Only problem is the troll guys touching my pecs and abs without my approval.
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    Aug 01, 2017 1:29 PM GMT
    Derrick_Rigg said
    I have done wet and dry saunas.

    Dry saunas I use for maybe five minutes after a workout to get a little relaxation and then I'm headed out the door.

    Wet saunas benefit me when my back or leg muscles are tight and need relaxing. I have laid on my back in the wet saunas and have benefited from wet heat. I'll maybe stay in for 15 minutes. Only problem is the troll guys touching my pecs and abs without my approval.

    For wet I will use a steam room. If I use a dry sauna regularly I seem to avoid most head and chest colds entirely. But if I get one I switch to a steam room.

    Best was when I belonged to private clubs. The steam generator would automatically add some menthol to the steam. The effect was like an old-fashioned Vicks vaporizer in your bedroom. Really open the breathing passages. Might not cure you any faster, I dunno, but you sure felt better and could breath more freely.
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    Aug 01, 2017 6:18 PM GMT
    Try jumping into an ice cold pool afterwards - It is very refreshing.
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    Aug 01, 2017 8:22 PM GMT
    A sauna can make you feel tired even if you don't work out. I always bring a big bottle of water in there. I drink it all and refill.
    Perfect way to detox.
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    Aug 01, 2017 11:11 PM GMT
    There are a lot of things I don't get.

    Football.
    Drinking.
    Smoking.
    Saunas and steamrooms because I wilt in the heat and I find both exhausting.

    I've turned down offers of getting blowjobs in saunas. I know, guys - this LAST admission NONE of you get.
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    Aug 03, 2017 5:15 PM GMT
    Willingshy saidIs it normal to feel exhausted after sitting in a sauna after a workout?


    I guess it depends on what you were sitting on...
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    Jan 17, 2018 8:09 PM GMT
    Alright, guys! You seem to know not much about saunas and their types...
    Relax, I`ll tell you, since I`m Russian and own my own and know how to use different types of saunas (besides GAY_SAUNAS... I`ve never been there and never will - sauna is the matter of health not sex).
    There are at least 3 types of saunas and they could be divided from the point of temperature and humidity:
    1. A real Scandinavian sauna. Average temperature is about 120-140C (or... let me check... 248-285F) and the lowest humidity (no more than 30% or you`re gonna get boiled). Usually this type of sauna is used for heating deep tissues of the body as well as some bones (spine, knees etc.) where people stay up to 7-10 minutes maximum (although guys from Finland could stay longer icon_lol.gif ).
    2. A Turkish Hamam. Average temperature is slightly above human body temperature - 40C or 105F - with humidity reaching 100%. From my point of view Turkis Hamam is just a place for comfort washing your body... and massage.
    3. A real Russian sauna - BANYA - is a type of sauna with average tempertarure 80-100C (or 175- 215F) - lower than Scandinavian but warmer its Turkish type - with humidity above 75% (70-85% average). Banya allows you to heat up your body temperature (slightly increasing it by 1,5-2C (or 2-4F) and to sweat a lot thus releasing all the toxins out of your skin. You may also have a massage that is traditionaly done with dried birch or oak bunches and priviously soaked befor use in hot water for at least 1-1,5 hours.

    I know a lot of Russians who cannot stand one type of sauna and prefer another one. Someone loves hotter, someone loves more wet air.
    But there is one of the strictest rules: there must be a source of fresh air comming into sauna - it should not be hermetically closed.
    Oh, and another one, since you use electrically heated saunas the percentage of oxygen decreases in time and that`s why you could feel no much comfortably in there. Let fresh air come into before visitig sauna if possible.
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    Mar 23, 2018 8:21 PM GMT
    TheElijah said
    Alright, guys! You seem to know not much about saunas and their types...

    And you've given a rather full, and interesting exposition on saunas. Thanks! I just stumbled back onto this thread while doing a search for something else.

    I had a number of books on sauna. Doesn't make me an expert, naturally, but I was kinda into it that much when I lived in northern climes. Less interested living now in Florida, where everytime you get into your closed car it's a sauna.

    As you say, people like different solutions and formulas, and their approach can be individually personal, or rigidly traditional. Here's mine:

    In the US we usually have electrically-heated rocks in a wooden room. That in most saunas you can pour water onto. But not too often a cold plunge pool. And I usually have 3 goals, although not always all 3 in the same session.

    One is to avoid muscle ache, after a physical workout. Can really help me. Another is to lose a deep chill, if I've been outside for too long with winter activities. The third is to prevent head & chest colds, or to mitigate those I might have already gotten. Although for a bad winter cold I might want a steam room instead, with some methol added to the steam.

    I want a lower temperature, perhaps 175-180ยบ F, so I can remain longer, get a good heat soak. Sorta like cooking food, the differences between quick searing and slow baking. I want the heat to reach deep inside my muscles, and to my joints.

    But I still need some breaks. So I step outside, and lacking a cold plunge pool, I stand under a cold shower. BTW, I always prefer a men's-only sauna, so I can do all this unencumbered with any clothing. In some parts of Europe the identical routine is acceptable coed, but this is the prudish US.

    My entire hot session lasts about 45 minutes. Then I have a long cold shower, and sit in the locker room for a while, still cooling down, or in a TV & reading lounge, if the facility has one for that purpose. Not only cooling, but also allowing my heart rate to decline, which takes longer as you age. Hence, I suppose, a source of clueless young guys bitching about the "old creepers" who don't instantly throw their clothes back on and quickly leave.

    Serious sauna, however you perform it, should be a process and a ritual. It isn't the same as running under a shower, drying, dressing, and racing off in your car as quickly as you can. But if during your lunch hour you try to bite off more than you can chew in the gym, you're gonna be reserving just 5 minutes for a meaningless sauna cameo appearance. Then dressing like a quick-change performer, and wondering why some guys linger lazily behind. You've missed the entire benefit & beauty of sauna.