Expletive, Expletive, EXPLETIVE: Blueberries Contain Solanine?

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    Jun 09, 2017 1:52 AM GMT
    CP: I've recently discovered, the hard way, that blueberries also contain solanine, the thing in nightshades that makes them bad for arthritis.

    OH CP; and I just bought some blueberries today. I'm throwing them away, then.

    Solanine is a glycoalkaloid poison found in species of the nightshade family (Solanaceae), such as the potato (Solanum tuberosum), the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and the eggplant (Solanum melongena). It can occur naturally in any part of the plant, including the leaves, fruit, and tubers. Solanine has pesticidal properties, and it is one of the plant's natural defenses. Solanine was first isolated in 1820 from the berries of the European black nightshade (Solanum nigrum), after which it was named.[1]

    Solanine is found in the nightshade family of botanicals, which includes potatoes, tomatoes, paprika, eggplant, tobacco, and peppers. In fact, more than 92 varieties and 2000 species of nightshade exist. The following foods contain solanine, but are not a part of the nightshade family, including: Blueberries.
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    Jun 09, 2017 2:23 AM GMT
    Solanine & Tomatine
    Solanine is a type of steroid alkaloid known as a glycoalkaloid – an alkaloid merged with a sugar. When the body begins to metabolize solanine, the sugar separates and solanidine is left. While not immediately toxic in the amounts ingested in nightshade vegetables, solanidine can store in the body and may release during times of stress, to the detriment of the body. (2)

    Solanine is primarily found in potatoes; the tomato counterpart of this solanine is tomatine.
    Both steroid alkaloids are produced similarly to chlorophyll, which means there will be more concentrated amounts of them in the green portions of the plant. You might not plan to eat potato leaves any time soon, but don’t skim past this! Potatoes beginning to sprout, green spots on potatoes, and yes — fried green tomatoes ­— could all be potential culprits of more concentrated solanine or tomatine amounts.

    Solanine and the other nightshade steroidal alkaloids can irritate the gastrointestinal system and act as acetylcholinesterase inhibitors – affecting neurotransmitters. (3) Actual solanine poisoning is rare, but has been documented to include severe vomiting and diarrhea, central nervous system depression, and even death. (4)

    https://draxe.com/nightshade-vegetables/
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    Jun 09, 2017 2:36 AM GMT
    Comment:

    Blueberries may not have solanine but

    As someone who is highly sensitive to Nightshades, I can attest to the fact that when I eat an Artichoke, or an Okra or even Blueberries, I feel like total crap - just like I do after eating something with Potato Flour in it, or Tomato Sauce.
    Regarding Travis' message, he is correct that Solanine is probably not going to give anyone who is not sensitive to it a problem, regardless of the source (potato, tomato, berry, etc...). But for someone who is sensitive to it, there is no question when you encounter it as an ingredient.
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    Jun 09, 2017 2:47 AM GMT
    Blueberries are anti-inflammatory because of the polyphenols. They are not part of the nightshade family but they do contain alkaloids which some people react to. In general, Dr. Myers considers them a healthy food on the Autoimmune Protocol so they are allowed. As with anything, if you notice they bother you, eliminate them.

    Dr. Amy Myers
  • Antarktis

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    Jun 09, 2017 1:01 PM GMT
    Fine I'll ask. What the hell is solanine?
  • transient

    Posts: 427

    Jun 09, 2017 3:40 PM GMT
    Nice dramatic thread title.

    Evidence and a citation would be nice.

    I dont believe you.
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    Jun 09, 2017 6:10 PM GMT
    Antarktis saidFine I'll ask. What the hell is solanine?


    Come on Antarktis, that question is answered in the first post:

    Solanine is a glycoalkaloid poison found in species of the nightshade family (Solanaceae), such as the potato (Solanum tuberosum), the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and the eggplant (Solanum melongena). It can occur naturally in any part of the plant, including the leaves, fruit, and tubers. Solanine has pesticidal properties, and it is one of the plant's natural defenses. Solanine was first isolated in 1820 from the berries of the European black nightshade (Solanum nigrum), after which it was named.[1]

    Solanine is found in the nightshade family of botanicals, which includes potatoes, tomatoes, paprika, eggplant, tobacco, and peppers. In fact, more than 92 varieties and 2000 species of nightshade exist. The following foods contain solanine, but are not a part of the nightshade family, including: Blueberries.


    Basically, I was corresponding with some nutrition friends, and one (CP, her initials) said it was good to take a break from jalapeno peppers, cayenne, and paprika, but be careful adding blueberries to your diet.
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    Jun 09, 2017 6:22 PM GMT
    transient saidNice dramatic thread title.

    Evidence and a citation would be nice.

    I don't believe you.


    I did not make the claim. Someone else did. I am posting to share her experience, giving this community to comment constructively. I have also sent her follow-up question: How was blueberries isolated as

    1) having solanine (which is odd, because it is not a nightshade), and
    2) having, more generally, a glycoalkaloid

    Now, a byproduct of what is worthy of gratitude is having more reasons to be wary of a) nightshades which have solanine and b) potatoes which have glycoalkaloids.


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    Jun 09, 2017 6:27 PM GMT
    Internet Search on Problems eating blueberries. (An internet search is not as good as more in-depth research.)

    Some individuals may experience an allergic reaction to a specific type of food. Symptoms are generally mild. For others, however, reactions can be extreme and sometimes life threatening. Blueberries contain salicylates, which are natural-occurring chemicals in plants. According to Auckland Allergy Clinic, blueberries have high salicylate content. If you are allergic to blueberries, it is often because you have a sensitivity to this compound. If you consume blueberries and experience allergy symptoms, contact a health care professional immediately for treatment.

    http://www.livestrong.com/article/189740-blueberry-allergy-symptoms/
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    Jun 09, 2017 6:38 PM GMT
    SOLANINE TOXICITY SYNDROME- TESTING

    1. Test your patient on the solanine vial (AK Test Kits). It may be positive over GV-20, GV-27 or over an area of chronic subluxations or chronic pain. Often it must be tested over the area of chronic pain or inflammation first before it shows over GV-20 or 27. It will either A) weaken a strong muscle or B) cause a strong or weak muscle to become hypertonic (in other words the strong muscle now won’t weaken when you approximate the spindle cells)

    2. Check the acetylcholine vial over the same area as it most often correlates (if the solanine vial does A or B above, the acetylcholine vial will most likely do A or B also, though not always the same one, e.g solanine may do A and acetylcholine may do B). You don’t need the acetylcholine vial to confirm- the solanine will do by itself.

    3. Also, if a patient is on calcium or vitamin D supplementation, see if they no longer strengthen on them if you test solanine simultaneously. This is most often the case and the supplements will typically yield little or no results on that patient, unless the solanines are removed from their diet.

    4. Often patients’ positive on any of the above steps will not weaken on individual solanine foods (though they need to avoid them).

    5. If step 1 is positive, see if it is negated by Thera Supreme (Mid American Marketing 1-800-922-1744). This will negate it in about 80% of cases. In the vast majority of cases, no other supplements will negate it and neither will any reflexes, acupuncture points, adjustments or desensitization procedures.

    6. Have the patient stay off nightshades (potato, tomato, eggplant, pepper, paprika, tobacco, ashwagandha, gogi) until the solanine vial no longer tests positive. This could take weeks or months or could be permanent. They should read labels carefully and have 100% avoidance for optimal results (if a label says “spices” and doesn’t say what kind assume it has paprika or red pepper). Once the vial no longer tests positive (on subsequent visits), if the patient wants to you can have them add some nightshades back into their diet for 3 straight days and then retest. If the vial tests negative- they can eat the foods in moderation but keep re-checking each visit. If positive- it is probably permanent.

    7. Thera Supreme appears to help rid the body of solanine. We give 3 scoops a day for the first 2 bottles and then cut to 1 scoop daily. In patients that will not comply with the diet- Thera Supreme should be taken indefinitely and results will not be optimal but will be much better than if it is not taken. The best I can theorize is that the Thera helps the body get rid of stored solanines faster. I have seen symptom improvement faster in those patients taking it. It does not fix the problem but allows symptoms to resolve faster. On patients that can’t be compliant to the diet it lessens (though does not eliminate ) the effects of solanine.

    http://www.michaellebowitzdc.com/html/Solanine.html
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    Jun 09, 2017 6:42 PM GMT
    Another Byproduct Gratitude for This Thread: Potatoes and French Fries

    Solanine & Tomatine
    Solanine is a type of steroid alkaloid known as a glycoalkaloid – an alkaloid merged with a sugar. When the body begins to metabolize solanine, the sugar separates and solanidine is left. While not immediately toxic in the amounts ingested in nightshade vegetables, solanidine can store in the body and may release during times of stress, to the detriment of the body. (2)

    = = =

    Stress is a significant problem for many people in the U.S.
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    Jun 09, 2017 7:09 PM GMT
    Life Extension Foundation: Blueberries DO contain glycoalkaloids! But they should not be a problem because they pass through the urine and feces. They do not stay in the body long enough to show up in a blood test.

    = = =

    Web MD and Life Extension Foundation is saying eat all the Nightshades that you want to eat. People may blame me for being more scientific than the Medical Industry. People may blame me for quoting case studies outside of the General Medical Industry and quoting alternative facts from outside of the General medical Industry which does not treat patients from the Blood Type and GenoType level of granularity.

    So, Life Extension Foundation is saying there is conflicting information about nightshades. If we cannot get to agreement on nightshades, we cannot get to agreement on glycoalkaloids, and if we cannot get to agreement there, we cannot get to solanine. AND UNTIL THE GENERAL MEDICAL INDUSTRY catches up and group people by epigenetics or GenoType and by BloodType, their conclusions are SUSPECT.

    However, I did an internet search on case studies, not unlike Carri, and found a Medical Doctor who has recommended a Nightshade Free Diet. Here http://jeffreydachmd.com/arthritis-and-nightshade-vegetables/
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    Jun 09, 2017 7:13 PM GMT
    https://www.amazon.com/Arthritis-Childers-Diet-That-Stops-Nightshades/dp/0938378171/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&qid=1481752364&sr=8-1-spell&keywords=arthritisw+childers&linkCode=sl1&tag=jeffreydach01-20&linkId=515fdf4cc614ff2365fbd2ff38d9681d

    5.0 out of 5 starsDr. Childers cured some awful symptoms for me.
    ByDaChipmunkon March 8, 2013
    Format: Paperback
    I had severe rheumatoid arthritis, I.B.S., age spots all over my hands and lower legs and feet, the right ankle and left foot were swollen and purple with serum-negative gout-like symptoms, I hadn't been able to close my hands for two years, and I had periodic intestinal bleeding. It wasn't until I heard one of the doctors make a short reference to nightshades, red meat, and iodine after a year and a half of his very expensive tests that I found out DOCTOR Norman Childers and his associates had published on this subject over 3 decades ago and many times since. I've bought Childers' books three times because some people we have loaned them out to never returned them. The Nightshades and Health book cured me of nearly all the rheumatoid arthritis/gout/spots/bleeding. This was in the early 1980's. His titles have varied.

    All the anti-inflamatories in the world won't cure you if you keep putting toxins in your system. Modified food starch = potatoes; tomatoes, paprika, pimento, tobacco, red and green peppers and eggplant are all nightshades. Highly acidic drinks and foods will also set off flares.

    Red meats and pork cause buildups of lactic acid in the muscles, peas contain purines. Get tested for high uric acid count, mine was 13 while normal is 5-9. I've been on allopurinol for 32 years.

    BTW - Yams or Sweet Potatoes are not nightshades.

    As to IBS symptoms - get an Alcat blood panel test done for food allergies. Red blood cells swell up when placed in trays with a selection of allergens if you react to them. That cured mine.

    [Then she said something about chocolate that cannot be admitted into this discussion because it was highly likely incorrect.]
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    Jun 09, 2017 7:21 PM GMT
    4) www.noarthritis.com
    The Arthritis Nightshades Research Foundation has been established to research why and how usage of these crops is causing arthritis in humans, and the relation they may have to other serious problems such as: heart aliments, cancer, circulatory problems, stroke, fast aging, Alzheimer’s, high blood pressure, crippling, and deterioration of major organs in the body. If you would like to contribute to these tax-free studies, please contact Dr. Childers.

    Unfortunately, there are so many important industries (drug, medical, agricultural, and marketing) adversely affected by these studies that about the only source of research funds is through devoted private contributors. Only the sufferers are happy with the program and the results. Dr. Norman F. Childers 3906 N.W. 31st PL. Gainesville, FL 32606 Phone 1-888-501-8822 or 352-372-5077

    And Republicans want to privatize everything, it seems. Know the dangers of that.
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    Jun 09, 2017 7:29 PM GMT
    CP flaked out on the claim that blueberries contain solanine.
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    Jun 09, 2017 7:43 PM GMT
    Life Extension Foundation: Blueberries DO contain glycoalkaloids! But they should not be a problem because they pass through the urine and feces. They do not stay in the body long enough to show up in a blood test.

    = = =

    Which glycoalkaloid/s?

    Glycoalkaloids come from Alkaloids. An alkaloid with a sugar group is a glycoalkaloid.

    The taxonomy (system of classifying) gets complicated to get to another glycoalkaloid other than solanine.
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    Jun 09, 2017 7:49 PM GMT
    Follow-up call to Life Extension Foundation:

    Yes, a blueberry does have a glycoalkaloid but the research does not show the name of that. When it comes to naming the type of glycoalkaloid, research shows solanine and potatoes. The alkaloid in a blueberry with an added sugar creating its glycoalkaloid could potentially create a solanine or some other yet unnamed glycoalkaloid but suffice it to say, yes: a blueberry does contain a glycoalkaloid.
  • LJay

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    Jun 10, 2017 4:26 AM GMT
    I am constantly reading that x food contqains potassium and that such a good source should be welcomed.

    Not always so. I happen to have too high a potassium level and should avoid the stuff.

    A little knowledge, applied narrowly, is a very dangerous thing. That is why I work closely with my doctors and avoid getting my health information from other sources without a good bit of scrutiny. As a matter of fact, the doctors are also scrutinized, though I do choose to work with those who are well reputed for their broad view of things.
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    Jun 10, 2017 1:32 PM GMT
    Uhm...as soon as I read "Solanine Vial Test over an area of subluxation" I knew we going down tinfoil-hat lane.....

    Test vials that *supposedly* react from the *outside* of the body, due to some "field", that they recommend being kept away from magnets because it will affect the natural aura/frequency/whatever? A combination of nuturopathic/chiropractic and homeopathic quackery and some technical terms to make people think it actually works, and it's *not* just the placebo effect or just a well-balanced diet that's helping....

    Ohboy...

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    Jun 10, 2017 4:56 PM GMT
    Doctor9 saidUhm...as soon as I read "Solanine Vial Test over an area of subluxation" I knew we going down tinfoil-hat lane.....

    Test vials that *supposedly* react from the *outside* of the body, due to some "field", that they recommend being kept away from magnets because it will affect the natural aura/frequency/whatever? A combination of nuturopathic/chiropractic and homeopathic quackery and some technical terms to make people think it actually works, and it's *not* just the placebo effect or just a well-balanced diet that's helping....

    Ohboy...



    Not so fast. That same internet finding goes on to state:

    6. Have the patient stay off nightshades (potato, tomato, eggplant, pepper, paprika, tobacco, ashwagandha, gogi) until the solanine vial no longer tests positive.

    = = =

    #1 A nightshade-free diet has helped people.


    #2 I did not know ashwagandha was a nightshade.

    Nightshades - The Weston A. Price Foundation
    https://www.westonaprice.org/health-topics/food-features/nightshades/
    Mar 30, 2010 - Other nightshades include goji berries (the new darling of the antioxidant crowd), ashwagandha (an adaptogenic herb from Ayurvedic ...

    Ashwagandha - Rodale's Organic Life
    https://www.rodalesorganiclife.com/.../ancient-powerful-herb-can-counter-stress
    Oct 19, 2015 - Ashwagandha is a member of the nightshade family, which also includes tomatoes—but, unlike the tomato, the quarter-inch, orange-red fruits ...
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    Jun 10, 2017 5:01 PM GMT
    Doctor9 saidUhm...as soon as I read "Solanine Vial Test over an area of subluxation" I knew we going down tinfoil-hat lane.....

    Test vials that *supposedly* react from the *outside* of the body, due to some "field", that they recommend being kept away from magnets because it will affect the natural aura/frequency/whatever? A combination of nuturopathic/chiropractic and homeopathic quackery and some technical terms to make people think it actually works, and it's *not* just the placebo effect or just a well-balanced diet that's helping....

    Ohboy...



    Second, Canada has recognized a problem with glycoalcaloides including alpha-solanine.

    http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/pubs/securit/2010-glycoalkaloids-glycoalcaloides/index-eng.php

    What is your position? How do you recognize if someone should reduce consuming glycoalkaloids or specifically solanine?
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    Jun 10, 2017 5:19 PM GMT
    Expletive, Expletive, EXPLETIVE: Blueberries Contain Solanine?

    For me, I am continuing to eat the blueberries I have been eating and I added it to my juicing recipe.

    As for nightshades, I am eliminating jalapeno peppers, cayenne, and paprika. I will think on reducing if not eliminating ashwagandha.
  • transient

    Posts: 427

    Jun 12, 2017 3:52 PM GMT
    StephenOABC said
    transient saidNice dramatic thread title.

    Evidence and a citation would be nice.

    I don't believe you.


    I did not make the claim. Someone else did. I am posting to share her experience, giving this community to comment constructively. I have also sent her follow-up question: How was blueberries isolated as

    1) having solanine (which is odd, because it is not a nightshade), and
    2) having, more generally, a glycoalkaloid

    Now, a byproduct of what is worthy of gratitude is having more reasons to be wary of a) nightshades which have solanine and b) potatoes which have glycoalkaloids.



    So you are just repeating​ someone elses unverified claims?

    This is disturbing, and should be a red flag to you.

    Its certainly making me more sceptical about any information you present here.

    Honestly, just reread what you wrote:

    "I did not make the claim. Someone else did. I am posting to share her experience"

    Im sure you have the best intentions but seriously, just regurgitating someone elses beliefs doesnt make them fact. And the worst part is the dramatic thread title.


    What would be good is making it clear from the start that its just an opinion.

    Secondly if you believe that opinion and care enough,why not do some research to help back up the opinion.




    I still dont believe the info presented in the OP.
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    Jun 15, 2017 2:27 AM GMT
    transient
    I'm sure you have the best intentions but seriously, just regurgitating someone else's beliefs doesn't make them fact.
    What would be good is making it clear from the start that its just an opinion.
    Secondly if you believe that opinion and care enough,why not do some research to help back up the opinion.
    I still don't believe the info presented in the OP.

    Stephenoabc
    She apologized to me and the Facebook page.
    I pass on her apology.

    I shared the information here to see what this community thought of it.
    You have provided no reason for your disbelief.
    My follow-up on the internet and two calls to Life Extension Foundation provided some information.
    I went slightly off topic with an additional internet search related to blueberry allergies. The lady had some adverse reaction to blueberries.

    "You still do not believe the information in the OP." Fine. I gave her the benefit of the doubt. I checked if the same could happen to me whatever happened to her for whatever reason. I deemed blueberries would not act like a nightshade in my body and I'm eating blueberries and drinking blueberry juice.