The American Financial Crisis and the French Revolution... a personal insight

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    Feb 19, 2009 7:10 PM GMT
    Personally, the way the high uppity-ups in the American financial institutions and banks and such behave make me think of the French nobility before their revolution. These CEOs etc act like french nobility that think they are entitled to their superior lives and bonuses, even though they are failing and not doing a damn thing.

    I wonder if the French still sell guillotines?

    animal
  • NickoftheNort...

    Posts: 1416

    Feb 20, 2009 12:17 AM GMT
    What will be the Bastille in this case? Wall Street? The Federal Reserve?

    ***
    Regarding entitlement, one of the reasons some of the CEOs in your example "think they are entitled" is a general attitude and social understanding that they are entitled to their wealth and all its trappings. While it's currently "in" now to disparage their excesses, that seems more of an exception than the rule (which has seemed to be to laud them for success in the market and legitimate their absurd salaries as the "market").
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    Feb 20, 2009 12:17 AM GMT
    How I miss the good ol'days. Unfortunately, history has painted such a terrible picture of La Pute d'Autriche

    Is it kinda creepy for anyone else that the last guillotine execution was in '77?
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    Feb 20, 2009 12:32 AM GMT
    NickoftheNorth saidWhat will be the Bastille in this case?

    I used to live by the Bastille and I can't tell you how many times I would get tourists asking where it was.
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    Feb 20, 2009 2:16 AM GMT
    NickoftheNorth saidWhat will be the Bastille in this case? Wall Street? The Federal Reserve?

    ***
    Regarding entitlement, one of the reasons some of the CEOs in your example "think they are entitled" is a general attitude and social understanding that they are entitled to their wealth and all its trappings. While it's currently "in" now to disparage their excesses, that seems more of an exception than the rule (which has seemed to be to laud them for success in the market and legitimate their absurd salaries as the "market").


    The FED, for sure!

    although, the French Revolution had a lot of manipulation and support by the French bankers, and it very much worked into their hands... they supported the revolutionary government, and when the violence got out of hand, they put their weight behind Napoleon, who in turn, supported them, and gave them the Bank of France, to control the credit of the nation.

    when Napoleon's wars got in the way of commerce and stability, and when he tried to take too much control of the Bank into his own hands, they moved their weight once again, and survived the next regime change.

    and the powers behind the Bank of France remain to this day.

    so... if the current situation is anything like the French Revolution, which, i think, is an apt comparison, let's hope it doesnt get hijacked by the big banking interests. they have a pretty good track record of seeing a revolution coming, and co-opting and controlling the change to suit their benefits. they learned their lesson with 1776... have we?icon_eek.gif
  • NickoftheNort...

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    Feb 20, 2009 9:50 PM GMT
    From its description, this film may also work as a metaphor for action: Land of the Dead
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    Feb 20, 2009 10:01 PM GMT
    QUOTE AUTHOR GOES HEREkaccioto stated:

    To you cowboi, i heartily give thanks for your continual preachings of why this stimulus is needed 'for the common good.' you continue to ensure the livelihood of my bonus, like ya did for '08 ;)


    I think we should start by cleaning up in our own backyards. Here is a fellow RJer that like to get bonus money from the tax payer. I vote he sould be the first in line
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    Feb 20, 2009 10:09 PM GMT
    gym_dude saidThe majority of the victims of the french revolution weren't nobility, just average people who fell foul of the commity of public safety. Just like the with the current financial situation, it's the average joe that will come of worst....


    agreed. the French Revolution unleashed the "Reign of Terror". And most are not aware that it did not have much support in the countryside, but was an urban driven revolution.

    it was an elite-driven and controlled Revolution, and the people took the brunt.