File Under: Duh! "Study: Youth see Christians as judgmental, anti-gay"

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 11, 2007 3:06 PM GMT
    http://www.usatoday.com/news/religion/2007-10-10-christians-young_N.htm

    And just this morning, I heard Brownback (keep the nasty comments about his name to yourselves!) say he couldn't understand why his campaign wasn't taking off.

    Slow but sure....slow but sure....
  • Laurence

    Posts: 942

    Oct 11, 2007 3:51 PM GMT
    Wahey.

    It's nice to know the next generations are wising up to how horrible organised religion actually is.

    God forbid that religion should preach love instead of hate.

    Loz
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    Oct 11, 2007 8:03 PM GMT
    Slowly things are changing in Western societies regarding religions view of gays and lesbians. However, the recent conflict within the Anglican Church brings home the fact that much of the rest of world (e.g. Africa, Asia) is still very conservative and reactionary.
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    Oct 12, 2007 12:06 AM GMT
    Religion, and any false belief systems are inherently bad.

    They prey on the "weak-minded" among us.

    Over the years, this has been studied time and time again: roughly 35% of all people will go along with something, even if it's blatantly false, if you say it consistently and enough times.

    Some humans are innately "weak-minded." They don't want truth, nor leadership, and take the path of, what seems to them, the least resistance.

    If it looks false; if it tests false, it's likely false.

    The intolerance, hatred, antagonism, and lack of critical thinking encouraged by false belief systems has gone on for several thousand years.

    It wasn't to long ago that The Catholic Church chopped off the heads of folks who said the world was round.

    Ironically, most people in false belief systems have little hope of conversion to reality-based views. It just is what it is: sad.

    E.g.: We are in IRAQ, dealing with a bunch of folks with passionate beliefs in very jaded false belief systems. Are we so audacious that we think we can change centuries of culture there?
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    Oct 12, 2007 12:16 AM GMT
    ^ Absololutely true. I was a Jehovah's Witness for 26 years. And pretty much learned to hate myself for what I was.

    I still have moments of such guilt, and it took so bloody long to break away from it.
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    Oct 14, 2007 6:06 AM GMT
    I am a devout Christian. The bigger half of my family is Mexican Catholic. When I came out, I actually hoped that half would disown me . . . they didn't. They love me and accept me for me.

    I hate that I am considered a bastard Christian child in the "community" or that I am "breaking the rules." But I have found that many of my devoutly religious friends are also some of the most accepting people when it comes to gays, pagans, wiccans, and so on. I also can't stand that the actions and words of some are ultimately seen as the words of all.

    Yeah there are a lot of problems with every religion, but there are not problems with every member of any certain religion.
    i.e. I have a DEVOULTY Mormon best friend.
  • eckilegs

    Posts: 223

    Oct 14, 2007 6:22 AM GMT
    Some of the most judgmental people I have ever known/met were people who professed to be devoted Christians. It's really sad since I was raised as one. People like my mother (still a very devoted believer in Christ) have to overcome a lot of initial stereotypes because people think she's going to hit them over the head with a bible and tell them they're going to hell.

    It's so sad. People in many religious groups hope to gain supporters, but are only turning people away due to the fact that they are so wrapped up in the "dirty" laundry of other people before they visit the laundromat themselves. Then the people who really ARE wanting to make a difference and help people are not able to because of the negative examples that the "christians" mentioned above are doing.
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    Oct 14, 2007 7:53 AM GMT
    Almost every time i read chuckystud's comments, i see absolute statements that remind me of religious dogmas.

    He writes: "Religion, and any false belief systems are inherently bad."

    On the surface it sounds fine but in fact faith is a fundamental part of who we are. I am an atheist but i can see that we all, without exception, operate on false belief systems. This might relate to an almost religious belief in capitalism, the idea that our media tell us the truth, that our government works in our best interest or that a dusty old book sets out the course for a better life.

    And he ends with: "We are in IRAQ, dealing with a bunch of folks with passionate beliefs in very jaded false belief systems. Are we so audacious that we think we can change centuries of culture there?"

    This statement alone is filled with so many false presumptions that it boggles the mind. Is it not worth noting that those very same belief systems are held by the "we" in this case. Your use of euphemism is also interesting in that it obscures the truth: "dealing" could perhaps be better read as "invading" or "killing" and "audacious" should really be "arrogant".

    My point is not actually to have a go at Chuckystud but more to point out that strong minds are just as likely to be undone by dogmas as weak ones - unfortunately stronger minds are far more dangerous in that they seem convinced of their righteousness. Personally, i would like to see more humble minds.
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    Oct 14, 2007 7:54 AM GMT
    It'll really be something when people discard religion entirely.

    Anti-gay or not, judgmental or not, Christianity is mythology wrapped in hypocrisy and is completely obsolete in the 21st century.

    For those who say that religion is necessary to teach what is right and what is wrong, I say that ethics can be taught to children and adults without interference from religion and secular laws can be used for enforcement.

    "Don't lie, cheat, steal, or kill. If you do these things, you will be punished." See how easy that is? No mention of god or religion whatsoever.
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    Oct 14, 2007 10:49 AM GMT
    I went to a porn convention for a client last weekend here. For another client I had gone to one in Las Vegas. In both cases my presuppositions about what people in the porn industry would be like were turned on their head.

    The people were gracious, humble, kind, honest, and not in the least conniving or, as I thought they would be, "greasy." They were just like anyone else I knew.

    The same has gone for my forays into Christianity. Except for some absurd experiences, which are also normal, Christians have been disarmingly polite and unironic. They have even been aware of the hypocracy and judgementalism mentioned above.

    One on one most people are just people, and can be wonderful and delusional at the same time. So why do we act like morons in big groups (especially about other groups)?