I Think We're Both Turning British, At Least In Some of Our Food Habits

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    Aug 06, 2017 1:32 PM GMT
    And not my conscious decision. But I find these food items creeping into our menu. His first choice will always be Italian food, but still...

    This week he suddenly told me he wanted scones. Scones? WTF? Those are like lead muffins. Whadda yah want English scones for? But OK, what he wants I'll try to get.

    So he had us go to a fancy coffee and pastry/sandwich shop, sorta like a locally-owned version of a Starbucks. Yeah, they've got scones, at $2 a pop. Are they crazy? OK, he gets 6, and I wasn't impressed. Shaped like round muffins, but twice as heavy and dry.

    Next, on my own, I tried the bakery from the supermarket chain we use. It has a great reputation. Price there? $2.99 for 8! And in the classic triangle shape, and much moister with better taste. So now he's happy, and I can eat them, too. I bought 16 and he gave some to friends to try.

    What does he put on them? Some "English Double Devon Cream". I never heard of such a thing, but he found some a week or so ago. The jar comes from "Melksham, Wilts, England". I guess he's been planning to get scones for a while.

    Served with the English tea we get through a friend from Manchester (Mawnchestah, as he pronounces it), I suppose we're becoming quite proper. And soon he says he gonna be making a shepherd's pie, using his French-made cast iron Dutch oven (now there's a triple incongruity) a dish that we both enjoy. Just silly. But also important to not find yourself in a rut. Always try new foods.
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    Aug 06, 2017 4:31 PM GMT
    and don't over-egg the pudding...

  • argus

    Posts: 1433

    Aug 06, 2017 7:08 PM GMT
    Plooje said
    art_deco saidAnd not my conscious decision. But I find these food items creeping into our menu. His first choice will always be Italian food, but still...

    This week he suddenly told me he wanted scones. Scones? WTF? Those are like lead muffins. Whadda yah want English scones for? But OK, what he wants I'll try to get.

    So he had us go to a fancy coffee and pastry/sandwich shop, sorta like a locally-owned version of a Starbucks. Yeah, they've got scones, at $2 a pop. Are they crazy? OK, he gets 6, and I wasn't impressed. Shaped like round muffins, but twice as heavy and dry.

    Next, on my own, I tried the bakery from the supermarket chain we use. It has a great reputation. Price there? $2.99 for 8! And in the classic triangle shape, and much moister with better taste. So now he's happy, and I can eat them, too. I bought 16 and he gave some to friends to try.

    What does he put on them? Some "English Double Devon Cream". I never heard of such a thing, but he found some a week or so ago. The jar comes from "Melksham, Wilts, England". I guess he's been planning to get scones for a while.

    Served with the English tea we get through a friend from Manchester (Mawnchestah, as he pronounces it), I suppose we're becoming quite proper. And soon he says he gonna be making a shepherd's pie, using his French-made cast iron Dutch oven (now there's a triple incongruity) a dish that we both enjoy. Just silly. But also important to not find yourself in a rut. Always try new foods.


    Be careful or you'll both soon have crooked, yellow, rotting British teeth to. How come nobody ever talks about the wonderful "single payer" British dental system?

    that's a long outdated stereotype.
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    Aug 06, 2017 8:31 PM GMT
    What, no jam with the thickened double cream on one's scones?
    Just think Southern Biscuits, when one thinks of scones; little diffrence.
    The inner lady muck, Hyacinth is showing Deco.
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    Aug 06, 2017 8:34 PM GMT
    Muskelprotz saidand don't over-egg the pudding...


    Heaven's to Betsy. Can just see Two Fat Queens, holding High Tea, in Lou of candlelight suppers.icon_razz.gif
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    Aug 06, 2017 9:36 PM GMT
    argus said
    that's a long outdated stereotype. [bad British teeth]

    Still promulgated today by comic Mike Meyers in his "Austin Powers" movies.
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    Aug 06, 2017 9:55 PM GMT
    art_deco said
    argus said
    that's a long outdated stereotype. [bad British teeth]

    Still promulgated today by comic Mike Meyers in his "Austin Powers" movies.

    Outdated?
    Not everyone can find a NHS dentist, or the waiting list is so long, they give up.
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    Aug 07, 2017 7:55 AM GMT
    Plooje said
    art_deco saidAnd not my conscious decision. But I find these food items creeping into our menu. His first choice will always be Italian food, but still...

    This week he suddenly told me he wanted scones. Scones? WTF? Those are like lead muffins. Whadda yah want English scones for? But OK, what he wants I'll try to get.

    So he had us go to a fancy coffee and pastry/sandwich shop, sorta like a locally-owned version of a Starbucks. Yeah, they've got scones, at $2 a pop. Are they crazy? OK, he gets 6, and I wasn't impressed. Shaped like round muffins, but twice as heavy and dry.

    Next, on my own, I tried the bakery from the supermarket chain we use. It has a great reputation. Price there? $2.99 for 8! And in the classic triangle shape, and much moister with better taste. So now he's happy, and I can eat them, too. I bought 16 and he gave some to friends to try.

    What does he put on them? Some "English Double Devon Cream". I never heard of such a thing, but he found some a week or so ago. The jar comes from "Melksham, Wilts, England". I guess he's been planning to get scones for a while.

    Served with the English tea we get through a friend from Manchester (Mawnchestah, as he pronounces it), I suppose we're becoming quite proper. And soon he says he gonna be making a shepherd's pie, using his French-made cast iron Dutch oven (now there's a triple incongruity) a dish that we both enjoy. Just silly. But also important to not find yourself in a rut. Always try new foods.


    Be careful or you'll both soon have crooked, yellow, rotting British teeth to. How come nobody ever talks about the wonderful "single payer" British dental system?


    Because yellow and crooked teeth doesn't mean unhealthy. Secondly, NHS only cover for clinical dental treatments and not cosmetic ones. Perhaps, if it had cover cosmetic treatment, they could all become models for Colgate.

    Better if you worry more about your own education.
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    Aug 08, 2017 7:10 AM GMT
    You do something once, and it's already a habit; Hmmmm.
  • kew1

    Posts: 1621

    Aug 12, 2017 2:43 PM GMT
    art_deco saidAnd not my conscious decision. But I find these food items creeping into our menu. His first choice will always be Italian food, but still...

    This week he suddenly told me he wanted scones. Scones? WTF? Those are like lead muffins. Whadda yah want English scones for? But OK, what he wants I'll try to get.

    So he had us go to a fancy coffee and pastry/sandwich shop, sorta like a locally-owned version of a Starbucks. Yeah, they've got scones, at $2 a pop. Are they crazy? OK, he gets 6, and I wasn't impressed. Shaped like round muffins, but twice as heavy and dry.

    Next, on my own, I tried the bakery from the supermarket chain we use. It has a great reputation. Price there? $2.99 for 8! And in the classic triangle shape, and much moister with better taste. So now he's happy, and I can eat them, too. I bought 16 and he gave some to friends to try.

    What does he put on them? Some "English Double Devon Cream". I never heard of such a thing, but he found some a week or so ago. The jar comes from "Melksham, Wilts, England". I guess he's been planning to get scones for a while.

    Served with the English tea we get through a friend from Manchester (Mawnchestah, as he pronounces it), I suppose we're becoming quite proper. And soon he says he gonna be making a shepherd's pie, using his French-made cast iron Dutch oven (now there's a triple incongruity) a dish that we both enjoy. Just silly. But also important to not find yourself in a rut. Always try new foods.


    Triangular scones?icon_eek.gif Not in Britain, traditionally they're round. Are you serving them in the Devon ( Clotted cream with jam on top) or Cornish (jam with the cream on top) style?
    The only person I've ever heard pronounce Manchester like that is the TV presenter Loyd Grossman, a Bostonian who's lived in London for 3 decades. icon_smile.gif
    https://youtu.be/elbrWlIyQqs YouTube footage of Mancunians talking.
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    Aug 15, 2017 9:39 PM GMT
    kew1 said
    Triangular scones?icon_eek.gif Not in Britain, traditionally they're round. Are you serving them in the Devon ( Clotted cream with jam on top) or Cornish (jam with the cream on top) style?
    The only person I've ever heard pronounce Manchester like that is the TV presenter Loyd Grossman, a Bostonian who's lived in London for 3 decades. icon_smile.gif
    https://youtu.be/elbrWlIyQqs YouTube footage of Mancunians talking.

    Scones are created round, like muffins. Then often cut into triangles before, or sometimes after baking. I prefer the triangles. Which way can reflect a bit of a British class distinction. Just like the pronunciation of the word scone is. Here in the US we tend to say scone like "tone".

    Another thing we do is bake fruit into the scones. I just had a blueberry scone with my afternoon tea, which prompted me to revisit this thread.

    In addition to the Double Devon Cream, I also had Black Currant Preserves. Likewise labeled as Product of England. I didn't know he had gotten that, until I started rooting around in the refrigerator.

    He's so sly & crafty! He obviously had this planned in advance. He's becoming as sneaky with surprises as I am. And he must really want to turn us into English gentlemen. We're too coarse, American, and just plain old, to change at this point, naturally, but it's kinda fun to pretend.
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    Dec 02, 2017 11:12 AM GMT
    art_deco said
    kew1 said
    Triangular scones?icon_eek.gif Not in Britain, traditionally they're round. Are you serving them in the Devon ( Clotted cream with jam on top) or Cornish (jam with the cream on top) style?
    The only person I've ever heard pronounce Manchester like that is the TV presenter Loyd Grossman, a Bostonian who's lived in London for 3 decades. icon_smile.gif
    https://youtu.be/elbrWlIyQqs YouTube footage of Mancunians talking.

    Scones are created round, like muffins. Then often cut into triangles before, or sometimes after baking. I prefer the triangles. Which way can reflect a bit of a British class distinction. Just like the pronunciation of the word scone is. Here in the US we tend to say scone like "tone".

    Another thing we do is bake fruit into the scones. I just had a blueberry scone with my afternoon tea, which prompted me to revisit this thread.

    In addition to the Double Devon Cream, I also had Black Currant Preserves. Likewise labeled as Product of England. I didn't know he had gotten that, until I started rooting around in the refrigerator.

    He's so sly & crafty! He obviously had this planned in advance. He's becoming as sneaky with surprises as I am. And he must really want to turn us into English gentlemen. We're too coarse, American, and just plain old, to change at this point, naturally, but it's kinda fun to pretend.


    Heaven's to Betsy, lady Muck.
    How simply pompous of one.
  • argus

    Posts: 1433

    Dec 02, 2017 7:56 PM GMT
    overcooked everything.
    With mushy peas.
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    Dec 03, 2017 1:52 AM GMT
    argus saidovercooked everything.
    With mushy peas.




  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 03, 2017 8:43 AM GMT
    American's love SPAM too.
    Hawaii's had a long passion for it.
    Me think Bob post, is a Spam.
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    Dec 03, 2017 7:38 PM GMT
    Well Deco, if that's all it takes for you to become a Pome.
    I'm a Bona Fide American.
    With an American Husband of over a quarter of a century SSR.
    With all the American recipes I cook and eat.
    Also with a long family history tbere, with towns, state parks, streets and roads, even Boulevards named after us
    I'm an absolute Bona Fide Yankee.
  • JackNNJ

    Posts: 1507

    Dec 05, 2017 3:07 AM GMT
    13264.jpg
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 05, 2017 6:32 PM GMT
    JackNNJ said13264.jpg


    Is this the profile pic for your next sock account?
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    Dec 05, 2017 6:39 PM GMT
    Ex_Mil8 said
    JackNNJ said13264.jpg


    Is this the profile pic for your next sock account?

    You seem triggered EXM8.
    Pray tell, why is this so.
    After all, England is a wee Island, with a wee Gen pool.
    It's a commonly knowen fact, old chum.
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4913

    Dec 05, 2017 6:59 PM GMT
    The British bad dental thing: Sometimes the trolls are stupid and sometimes they're just ignorant. To the simply ignorant ones: the British dental issues were nothing more than a reflection of the extreme deprivation all Brits had to endure as their economy sputtered back to life following their valiant sacrifice to SAVE THE FUCKING FREE WEST from Hitler. So you fucking trolls have some respect. Their dental system is certainly as good as the American system now. Better for the poor in society.
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    Dec 05, 2017 9:32 PM GMT
    Destinharbor said
    The British bad dental thing: Sometimes the trolls are stupid and sometimes they're just ignorant. To the simply ignorant ones: the British dental issues were nothing more than a reflection of the extreme deprivation all Brits had to endure as their economy sputtered back to life following their valiant sacrifice to SAVE THE FUCKING FREE WEST from Hitler. So you fucking trolls have some respect. Their dental system is certainly as good as the American system now. Better for the poor in society.

    Great points! And I greatly admire the British. After all, much of our basic American traditions can be traced back to our Mother Country. Including our concept of individual freedom, and standing up for our rights.

    And yet, very early our young land was an amalgam of many nationalities. Including the Dutch, my ancestors, who predated the British where they founded their colony (Nieuw Amsterdam). Our greatest national strength is diversity and renewal. Although Republicans like Trump would make it our weakness.

    Beware of racial stereotypes, like those Republicans peddle. WASPs are pretty much exhausted and burnt out, with little more new to contribute.

    After all, the essence of conservatism is preserving the past and the status quo. No future there. Look to the younger and newer nationalities for the future energy and drive we need in the 21st Century. Rebirth, reinvention & renewal is the key. Just like America has done in centuries past. Regardless of what the WASPs may try to tell you.
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    Dec 05, 2017 11:08 PM GMT
    The big question: Is it jam first or cream first?

    A-composite-of-two-scones-005.jpg

    We Brits love to debate the important questions of our time.
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    Dec 05, 2017 11:37 PM GMT
    Ex_Mil8 saidThe big question: Is it jam first or cream first?

    A-composite-of-two-scones-005.jpg

    We Brits love to debate the important questions of our time.

    I suppose mixing them together would be totally out of the question. And ruin the presentation.
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    Dec 30, 2017 11:56 AM GMT
    Ex_Mil8 saidThe big question: Is it jam first or cream first?

    A-composite-of-two-scones-005.jpg

    We Brits love to debate the important questions of our time.


    https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/wordofmouth/2014/jun/12/how-to-eat-cream-tea-scones-jam

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    Dec 30, 2017 10:32 PM GMT
    You've certainly got being a whinging Pome, down pat half brother.