Have you read "in Defense of Food?"

  • justinlee86

    Posts: 501

    Feb 21, 2009 5:03 AM GMT
    This book is amazing...def. has opend up my eyes. If you are interested in Nutrition and want to learn how to be healthier read this book.

    I have been trying to use some of the tips in this book and I am not going to lie its pretty tough to eat "healthy" now a days but its def. worth a try.

    sorry this was totally random but I just wanted to share this.


    here is the link to the authors website...I hope I did it right.
    http://www.michaelpollan.com/indefense.php

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    Feb 21, 2009 5:36 AM GMT
    Interesting. But I will not give up shame eating chicken mcnuggets in the dark.
  • vindog

    Posts: 1440

    Feb 21, 2009 5:53 AM GMT
    justinlee86 saidThis book is amazing...def. has opend up my eyes. If you are interested in Nutrition and want to learn how to be healthier read this book.

    I have been trying to use some of the tips in this book and I am not going to lie its pretty tough to eat "healthy" now a days but its def. worth a try.

    sorry this was totally random but I just wanted to share this.


    here is the link to the authors website...I hope I did it right.
    http://www.michaelpollan.com/indefense.php




    Yea you look like you have difficulties eating healthy....I think you may need to sign up for the RJ Weight Loss Challenge

    icon_wink.gif


    I'll check it out....nutrition is one of my passions. I've heard good things about his book The Omnivore's Dilemma

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    Feb 21, 2009 6:11 AM GMT
    He lost me when he said, “Food is also about pleasure, about community, about family and spirituality, about our relationship to the natural world, and about expressing our identity.”

    Well, he lost me ideologically, but not as a reader (I’ve just read the online intro, not the book. I’m only commenting on what I can glean from the intro.) There’s a major disconnect between his claim that what he terms “nutritionism” is responsible for America’s health problems, and then his ensuing discussion regarding “the American diet” (which in reality doesn’t follow nutrition advice). The introduction’s other major intellectual problem is that it completely ignores scientists’ prescriptions to eat whole foods; it claims that nutritionism focuses on individual nutrients, but a science-based approach already recognizes the need to eat whole foods and avoid processed crap.

    It sounds like he’s taken a perfectly ordinary set of dietary guidelines and woven them into an ingeniously marketable narrative.
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    Feb 21, 2009 6:31 AM GMT
    I was brainwashed into believing the fat is bad myth...a myth that is fact for most Americans, nutritionists or otherwise for 40 years. Cholesterol is the basic fuel of the human body goddamnit. What kills me is that i remember growing up not believing that i could ever be brainwashed.

    As I lost pound after pound by adding saturated fat back into my diet and cutting back on Cardio exercise ( which supposedly burns that evil fat..ha ha ) I began to wonder how many more scientific myths I base my life on. I might as well be living in the Dark Ages.
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    Feb 21, 2009 6:38 AM GMT
    justinlee86 saidThis book is amazing...def. has opend up my eyes. If you are interested in Nutrition and want to learn how to be healthier read this book.

    I have been trying to use some of the tips in this book and I am not going to lie its pretty tough to eat "healthy" now a days but its def. worth a try.

    sorry this was totally random but I just wanted to share this.


    here is the link to the authors website...I hope I did it right.
    http://www.michaelpollan.com/indefense.php


    I don't think you need any help from a book. You look pretty good already. icon_biggrin.gif
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    Feb 21, 2009 10:27 AM GMT
    you guys should read the Omnivore's dilemma and The new Barbara Kingsolver book, Animal vegetable miracle. both are also great reads
  • justinlee86

    Posts: 501

    Feb 21, 2009 2:24 PM GMT
    hey satyricon331 you are making some great points and I agree it seems weird especially if you havent read the book. He does explain it very well to why he believes "nutritionism" isnt working for us. I say give the book a try...it can get a bit dry at times but I promise if you enjoy learning and are interested in your health read it.
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    Feb 21, 2009 2:39 PM GMT
    Is it "nutritionism" that gives us the ridiculously misguiding USDA food pyramid?
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    Feb 21, 2009 5:03 PM GMT
    Pollan is a master at helping his readers make the connection between food and health. I think it is important to realize how often we eat food that actually causes disease instead of choosing to eat food that prevents it. He also is fantastic and connecting the dots between agribusiness, farm subsidies and what we consider "natural and healthy". Someone needed to blow the whistle.

    We live in a society that would rather pop a vitamin instead of consuming a carrot or a protein shake instead of an actual meal and that just proves the disconnect. It is the whole food that promotes health, not the sum of its parts.

    Take a look around next time you are out and about and tell me that the USDA and their food pyramid is working.




  • vindog

    Posts: 1440

    Feb 21, 2009 5:55 PM GMT
    Satyricon331 saidHe lost me when he said, “Food is also about pleasure, about community, about family and spirituality, about our relationship to the natural world, and about expressing our identity.”

    .



    whether you like it or not, this is true even if you don't see it.

    Pleasure---eating something that tastes good even if you don't need it
    Community--going to restaurants is community, the farmers market
    family--raising your children, getting together for family holidays, which is surrounded by food, usually
    spirituality--eating and choices that create your place in the world. Plus food restrictions and fastings due to holidays
    relationship to natural world--where we get our food? farms and ranches are part of natural world
    Expressing our identity--are we fast food junkies? Organic eaters? What do our choices say about our personality?





    mnjock2003 said.

    Take a look around next time you are out and about and tell me that the USDA and their food pyramid is working.






    No one follows the food pyramid....thats why it doesn't work! The average person doesn't even know what the food pyramid is. It's like saying that quitting smoking doesn't work, since people are still dying everywhere from smoking....it will work if people choose to abide by it.

    Think if it was mandatory that every person see a nutritionist once a month.
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    Feb 21, 2009 6:23 PM GMT
    vindog said
    The average person doesn't even know what the food pyramid is. It's like saying that quitting smoking doesn't work, since people are still dying everywhere from smoking....it will work if people choose to abide by it.

    Think if it was mandatory that every person see a nutritionist once a month.


    Actually, I think the food pyramid , which is a total failure in its current state, should be created by the Centers for Disease control and the USDA should have absolutely nothing at all to do with it. Half of the creators of the food pyramid are in agribusiness which to me, creates a conflict of interest. Every child is taught the food pyramid in school and our school lunches are based on that pyramid. However , most of the fruit comes in a can and is laden with sugar, vegetables are anything but fresh, the meat is usually in the form of nuggets or patties that are breaded or toppings on a pizza or burgers and are loaded with antibiotics (70% of antibiotics in this country are used in our food creating super strains of bacteria like antibiotic resistant e coli). Grilled cheese is served weekly but it is under milk and white bread is refined grain that is supposedly healthy, right? lol.

    The guidelines are much too confusing because processed food just is not the same as whole food but the average person doesn't consider that because the food industry doesn't want you to know that. People refuse to believe that someone would sell them food that is designed to make the sicker and sicker the more of it they eat, in fact, it is supported by government subsidies to make sure it remains cheap. Why do you think value meals are a value? But shitty food like that has a place on the pyramid right?

    I am all for the enjoyment of food in all of its forms but let's be sensible and realize most of what we are think about food is a load of crap. Michael Pollan is opening up the dialogue and making the mainstream reader consider what we have long been avoiding.


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    Feb 21, 2009 8:00 PM GMT
    mnjock2003: “Michael Pollan is opening up the dialogue and making the mainstream reader consider what we have long been avoiding.”

    Pollan’s introduction, as an argument, is weak, but perhaps it has rhetorical virtues I hadn’t considered. I’m not really the best at judging rhetoric. Perhaps what Pollan offers is his rhetorical ability to have people accept the dietary advice they should have accepted long ago, as you seem to be suggesting here.


    vindog: “whether you like it or not, this is true even if you don't see it.”

    Since people around the world have exhibited the ability to derive pleasure, community, etc., from whatever they’re eating, those questions (except perhaps the one concerning how it relates to the natural world) do not logically affect what is the most optimal diet. Pollan is muddling two issues – what we eat, and how we eat it – in order to create the unified antagonist he uses to keep his narrative going. For example, it’s perfectly possible to make whole foods so convenient that consuming them has all the social-isolation problems he associates with the Western diet (it’s what I do). Alternatively, many families bond over their sit-down McDonald’s. Pollan’s introduction exploits a mere correlation in his introduction simply to create a marketable narrative. Perhaps the book itself does a better job.

    So, again, I think his argument is weak, but if it’s rhetorically powerful enough to get people to improve their diets, I guess it’s not a bad thing. I do worry, though, that Pollan might convince people not to take omega-3 supplements… most food’s lipid profiles have changed so that they no longer provide the omega-3 levels they used to, and from the introduction (which speaks from “tradition”) I don’t know if he’s given such changes adequate consideration.