Should I just get weight loss surgery already?

  • onlyawhisper

    Posts: 85

    Oct 14, 2017 9:43 PM GMT
    I know everyone on here will say it's the "easy way out" and that I'm just lazy and don't want to put in the work. And that may be true - partially. I've been overweight throughout most of my teenage years and my entire adult life. I'm 27 years old and suffer from depression and anxiety. Lack of motivation is a huge problem for me. Yes, I see a therapist and yes, I take medication.

    I'm just tired of looking and feeling like this. I've been to the gym before, but unless I am with someone I feel absolutely clueless on what to do. Not to mention that I think my muscles have atrophied since I rarely work out, so doing weights is extremely hard for me. I've done cardio but I feel like it only helps so much.

    I would be more motivated to work out if I were less heavy and just needed to tone up. It's difficult for me to exercise at this weight and I've done numerous diet programs where I lost a decent amount of weight and then it just came back on after. I'm always hungry, and I just feel like it might be time to look into other options like the gastric sleeve or lap band surgery.

    I'm not even 5'9" and I weigh about 235 lbs. I hate the way I look in photos and I just honestly don't see myself losing the weight on my own. I've had surgery as a teen for Ulcerative Colitis so I need to see if I'm even a candidate first. But if I am, I'm strongly going to consider it. I have sleep apnea related to my weight problem, so I think my insurance would cover it. I'm ready to just say "screw it".
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    Oct 14, 2017 9:46 PM GMT
    Look into something called CoolSculpt. It freezes and does something to the fat cells.
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    Oct 15, 2017 4:11 PM GMT
    I think Coolsculpting, like lipo, is designed for problem areas after most weight loss, and similarly would not be covered by insurance like lap band or bariatric surgery might.

    If you think lap band or bariatric surgery's the easy route to weight loss think again.

    Most people who have it regain the weight. (I call it the Carney Wilson Effect.) Why?

    Before those surgeries in the '70s people would get their jaws wired but they could still sip milkshakes through a straw. Same with lap band or bariatric surgery, and one afterwords can still adapt and injest huge caloric surpluses despite reduced stomach capacity.

    PLUS one has to have the discipline to remain on lifelong vitamin supplements to counter the deficiency created by the food intake limits imposed by the surgery.

    So ask yourself - "If I'm going to experience perpetual discomfort and have to be disciplined ANYWAY - still watch my caloric intake, still exercise (recommended), AND be stuck having to be vigilant with dietary supplements the rest of my life - shouldn't I just apply that discipline to the milder discomfort of diet and working out? Wouldn't hiring a personal trainer be WAY cheaper?"

    I think lap band and bariatric surgery should be limited to lifesaving measures for those at least 350lbs, not people looking to lose weight for aesthetic reasons and to lower their blood pressure.



  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4913

    Oct 15, 2017 5:34 PM GMT
    I agree^^^. What you must ultimately do is find a diet you love that targets your desired weight. Use the formula to determine how many calories a person at your DESIRED weight would eat to neither lose nor gain weight, most likely somewhere around 2,500 calories. Then find foods that will satisfy you. In my case, that mean't no sugar, spices instead if fats, portion control, limited alcohol. But now that I'm on target weight wise, I can have some cheat days and eat a slice of pizza or a baked potato or something else I might be craving. Look at foods created by societies along the spice trade route and you'll find flavor without fat. You must work out and get cardio. Sure it's hard if you're fat and out of shape. But figuring out how to use the gym isn't all that tough and you can hire a trainer temporarily if you can't do it on your own. Add a protein shake (with water) once or twice/day to feed your muscles and reduce your hunger. Do nothing to lose the weight. Increase your exercise and eat in a life-long sustainable way that makes you happy. The results will come and as you improve your shape, so will the motivation. Good luck!
  • trvlmscl

    Posts: 186

    Oct 15, 2017 11:39 PM GMT
    THIS IS WHY INSURANCE IS SO FUCKING EXPENSIVE.

    The average cost of GB surgery is $23000. I'm a trainer, I usually charge $75/hr but go as low as 40 for every-other-day clients. $23k would get you a little over 3 years of serious lifestyle change with professional guidance/support. And hopefully you'd chose a trainer you can actually be friends with for 3 years - helpful for depression and dependence on medication. A lot of trainers are decent with nutrition, too - I host meal prep parties with my clients, and cook entire weeks supply for those that want no part of the kitchen, ha.

    Back in my twink days working at PayPal, I sat next to this very large woman. In our building we had an awesome, albeit small, gym for us 24/7. I went during every break, and often invited her to join me. Always an excuse "my knees hurt" "I'm too tired" "Gym too far" THE GYM IS RIGHT NEXT TO THE CAFETERIA. She got GB surgery paid for, and the insurance even covered her income after PTO exhaustion. She was LAZY AS FUCK and stayed home longer than necessary, at the expense of our corporate insurance. What was she eating every day she came back? Ice cream. And still wouldn't work out with me.

    I just messaged a friend of mine that still works there. Apparently she no longer does, but rumor has it she got a second surgery before she left. I can't imagine #2 is less expensive than #1.

    Moral of the story? Surgery won't change your lifestyle or habits. If anything, the recovery reinforces laziness. Hire a trainer, change your life. Especially you. You're 27.

    Or, for free: Look up Greg Plitt on YouTube. He did an AMAZING series before his unfortunate death (ran over by a train). You're welcome, thank me by posting your results in a few months.
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    Oct 17, 2017 11:03 AM GMT
    [quote][cite]trvlmscl said[/cite]THIS IS WHY INSURANCE IS SO FUCKING EXPENSIVE.

    The average cost of GB surgery is $23000. I'm a trainer, I usually charge $75/hr but go as low as 40 for every-other-day clients. $23k would get you a little over 3 years of serious lifestyle change with professional guidance/support. And hopefully you'd chose a trainer you can actually be friends with for 3 years - helpful for depression and dependence on medication. .
    Moral of the story? Surgery won't change your lifestyle or habits. Hire a trainer. Especially you. You're 27.

    This is GREAT advice. My personal trainer has turned by entire life around, physically and mentally! Look around and find the right trainer and you will be amazed at the results. It is not a quick fix but is a lifetime fix.

  • trvlmscl

    Posts: 186

    Oct 20, 2017 6:49 AM GMT
    OP: I just read your other post that private fitness instruction is out of your budget, and I can appreciate that.

    However, YouTube is FREE. Gym membership is CHEAP (YMCA, LA, 24, Anytime). Yes, I will say that if you follow through with surgery, I will totally say that you are taking the "easy way out", "lazy", and just plain stupid for making the wrong choice to surgically change your body instead of improving your lifestyle/habits for long term happiness. "Oh god I can't wait until I'm immobilized by my weight around the age of 45" - said noone.
  • MuchoMasQueMu...

    Posts: 1165

    Oct 20, 2017 9:13 AM GMT
    trvlmscl said
    Back in my twink days working at PayPal, I sat next to this very large woman. In our building we had an awesome, albeit small, gym for us 24/7. I went during every break, and often invited her to join me. Always an excuse "my knees hurt" "I'm too tired" "Gym too far" THE GYM IS RIGHT NEXT TO THE CAFETERIA. She got GB surgery paid for, and the insurance even covered her income after PTO exhaustion. She was LAZY AS FUCK and stayed home longer than necessary, at the expense of our corporate insurance. What was she eating every day she came back? Ice cream. And still wouldn't work out with me.



    I was a trainer for a few years. I left the industry because most people are like the woman you described. It sounds cynical but from my experience too many people don't or are not willing to change. I even still see it today. Trainers at the gyms I work out at are with clients and almost none of them change. Weeks, months and even years go by and these people still look the same. They're fat and look unhealthy. You would never guess that any of them actually belong to a gym if you saw them out on the street.

    I have been working out for over thirty years. I love it. Back in my twenties I thought since I loved the gym so much that becoming a trainer would be good for me. I was wrong. It had such a negative impact on me and my motivation to work out. I don't ever want to be a trainer ever again. The only type of trainer I would become is one for professional athletes.
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    Oct 26, 2017 11:17 AM GMT
    You need to *exercise*. ( That does not nessicarily mean "working out " in a gym,) Why? Besides the effect of exercise contributing to weight loss, studies have shown that it reduces *depression *., a problem you say you have. Exercise itself also increases your metabolic rate, which will tend to reduce your weight, or at least stop weight gain.
    Try running, or if you don't like running, vigorous walking, as a daily routine. Change your diet - eliminate sugars and other simple carbs (vegetables can be tasty, and are low-calory).

    Unless you have some real medical problem with your metabolism, vigorous exercise combined with a low carb diet, WILL reduce your weight, and it should reduce your experience of depression.
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    Oct 27, 2017 4:04 AM GMT
    The OP needs to do much more research into Bariatric Surgery. It is not usually even considered for someone with less than 100 lbs to lose, or has a BMI less than 40. Even then, you need to have some sort of co-morbidity, like diabetes, severe sleep apnea, heart or lung issues, etc. The OP most likely doesn't qualify for the surgery....

    I had weight loss surgery 12 years ago and lost almost 250 lbs. Yes, I was almost 500 lbs....It was the last resort in a desperate race to not die.
    The easy way out? Obviously, the ignorance and extreme bias on this site about this topic, will just say "put the fork down, hit the gym , etc".... You don't think that has ever been tried? You really think that you are Mr. wizard and the first or only one to say this? Get over yourself princess! Better, smarter and actual medical professionals study this and it is way more involved than you think. You really have no concept of the struggles and the repeated attempts fat people go through, nor the unbelievable abuse a fat person endures... There is Nothing easy about it, and the RISKS are VERY REAL,the PAIN is also VERY REAL...and the CHANGES are also VERY REAL!
    Whoever said it costs $23K, is grossly under-priced. I had to take 2 years of nutrition classes, physiology, cooking, psychology, etc...REQUIRED by my insurance and the hospital program. I did mine at The Ohio State University Hospital. The insurance didn't cover any of the education classes, and all of the testing and dr. supervised diet plan and the gym time was "out of pocket"...There was NOTHING easy about this.
    Unless you personally know a person that died or has had a seriously negative experience with the surgery, save the anecdotal story of pain agony and regret. I can name off 1000's of real people that are successes

    Also, just to be honest and fair about this....bariatric surgery is not about fitting into a 28 inch waist, nor is it about becoming a model or Adonis, or getting your BMI to 20 or body fat to 7%....It's about improving your health, reducing your risks over time and improving your quality of life to be more active and make better choices of food and lifestyle. It is a "reset" that give a person a period of time to re-learn how to make healthy choices. Its not a 100% fix, there are failures. Good Luck to anyone that pursues Gastric Surgery. Ignore the nay-sayers, because it's not their life, nor their choice, and they will all be "eating crow" when you succeed. Be aware, if you succeed, you may have a lot of extra skin that hangs and may not retract. It can be a problem. Also know that you will change, body, mind and soul....when you lose that much weight, you uncover many mental hangups, vulnerabilities and baggage...Couch time with a therapist is highly recommended. This is a very holistic change, to not address any of these parts, is to cheat yourself out of being the best "you".
    A word of warning about low carb diets or the paleo diet or the cabbage diet and the like....your macro splits over the day should be 40% carbs, 40% Proteins and 20% fats. Unless you are an extreme athlete or have a medical necessity, these ratios work for everyone. Carbs are simple or complex....complex is preferred, as it is less processed and more natural state...and likely has fiber with it making it more filling and longer burning. Carbs and proteins both provide 4 calories per gram, and fat is 9 calories per fat. Fats are needed because of fat soluble vitamins and minerals, among other thing. Before changing your diet or going all extreme and restrictive, keep a food log of everything you eat or drink, including dick, for at least a week.... get to know your caloric intake and your macro splits....500 calories change in a week will make substantial weight changes over time....baby steps! Took years to get fat, months to recover isn't too bad...
  • NearTheBorder

    Posts: 59

    Oct 27, 2017 11:57 PM GMT
    trvlmscl saidTHIS IS WHY INSURANCE IS SO FUCKING EXPENSIVE.

    The average cost of GB surgery is $23000. I'm a trainer, I usually charge $75/hr but go as low as 40 for every-other-day clients. $23k would get you a little over 3 years of serious lifestyle change with professional guidance/support. And hopefully you'd chose a trainer you can actually be friends with for 3 years - helpful for depression and dependence on medication. A lot of trainers are decent with nutrition, too - I host meal prep parties with my clients, and cook entire weeks supply for those that want no part of the kitchen, ha.

    Back in my twink days working at PayPal, I sat next to this very large woman. In our building we had an awesome, albeit small, gym for us 24/7. I went during every break, and often invited her to join me. Always an excuse "my knees hurt" "I'm too tired" "Gym too far" THE GYM IS RIGHT NEXT TO THE CAFETERIA. She got GB surgery paid for, and the insurance even covered her income after PTO exhaustion. She was LAZY AS FUCK and stayed home longer than necessary, at the expense of our corporate insurance. What was she eating every day she came back? Ice cream. And still wouldn't work out with me.

    I just messaged a friend of mine that still works there. Apparently she no longer does, but rumor has it she got a second surgery before she left. I can't imagine #2 is less expensive than #1.

    Moral of the story? Surgery won't change your lifestyle or habits. If anything, the recovery reinforces laziness. Hire a trainer, change your life. Especially you. You're 27.

    Or, for free: Look up Greg Plitt on YouTube. He did an AMAZING series before his unfortunate death (ran over by a train). You're welcome, thank me by posting your results in a few months.

    +10000
  • dekiruman

    Posts: 8

    Oct 31, 2017 3:01 PM GMT
    I would say go for it. As you lose weight naturally your body begins to fight back using a process called adaptive thermogenesis. It's really fucked up. Lets take two people

    1. ) has always weighed 180 lbs

    2.) diets from 200 lbs to 180 lbs

    The person who dieted down to his goal weight will actually burn a few hundred calories less per day than the person who is naturally 180 because the body begins looking for ways to increase metabolic efficiency because it wants to be 200 again.

    If you're thinking about bariatric surgery though, there are plenty of options in the realm of supplementation that could help you out, Cardarine, a sarm for example, alters gene expression and will shift the way your body uses nutrients so that more calories become muscle (provided you actually work out.) There are others, but I wont name them because if you use them wrong you could experience some pretty adverse side effects.


    I can say though that at one point in my life I carried some extra weight around and couldn't get it to stay off. I used cardarine and something I would advise against ......dnp, to get rid of it and it never ever came back. I've never touched those supps again and didnt have to.