How do you cook your freshly killed Elk?

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    Oct 27, 2017 1:53 AM GMT
    My good mormon neighbors shared some fresh kill.
    ELK! Have you tried it?

    So I am marinating it in smoke flavoring, pepper and mustard sauce.
    I have more too!! Any other ideas? I am making Shredded Elk Sandwiches for Saturday.
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    Oct 27, 2017 2:45 AM GMT
    I had some as a sausage once...It was really tasty, but it was more spicy than I care for...
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    Oct 27, 2017 3:37 AM GMT
    My friends in North Dakota would take their game elk to a butcher. It'd be cut to order, so they could have steaks in different sizes and thicknesses, elk sausages, and other varieties.

    They all had these huge top-opening freezers (as I did), sorta like white coffins. The elk and other kill, like duck & pheasant, would also be kept frozen during the winter, after the hunting seasons had ended.

    They provided a family's meat needs for most of the long cold season. No need for supermarket meat, unless they wanted something different, like beef or ham. But some farm families will periodically slaughter a cow or a pig, also usually dressed by the local butcher, and those go into the big home freezer(s), too.

    And even very small farming towns have their own local butcher store. That might also sell meat they get year-round through their own conventional supply channels, like a more typical butcher shop operates.

    I've eaten elk, and bison, too. Not bad. Although bison meat is often shredded, and blended with a kinda BBQ sauce, served on hamburger buns. Called "buffalo burgers", something like a Sloppy Joe. I'm sure there are other versions I never had.

    But then I can fill pages about the strange "native" foods I ate during my 11 years in North Dakota. Both foods of the people mostly of Northern European descent, and also the truly native Americans, on their own lands.

    Who, BTW, are the most friendly, accommodating, generous people you can imagine. To paraphrase from a movie about the West and the Plains Indians, my heart would "Soar like a hawk" whenever I was invited into one of their homes, community centers or reservation schools. Where we did sometimes have elk or bison.
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    Oct 27, 2017 4:25 AM GMT
    I smoke Kangaroo, and share it with neighbours.
    Smoked crocodile tail, is something too.
    I myself adore smoked eel; Japanese style.
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    Oct 27, 2017 5:04 AM GMT
    two_meninlove saidI smoke Kangaroo, and share it with neighbours.
    Smoked crocodile tail, is something too.
    I myself adore smoked eel; Japanese style.


    Wow, You eat Kangaroo? Like in a Kangaroo burger? Grilled? lol Never would have imagined.
    Croc.....lol
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    Oct 27, 2017 12:52 PM GMT
    2bnaked said
    two_meninlove saidI smoke Kangaroo, and share it with neighbours.
    Smoked crocodile tail, is something too.
    I myself adore smoked eel; Japanese style.


    Wow, You eat Kangaroo? Like in a Kangaroo burger? Grilled? lol Never would have imagined.
    Croc.....lol

    Yep, roo meat has no fat, and is also high in protein.
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    Oct 28, 2017 12:39 PM GMT
    BTW, to directly address the thread topic, I've always seen elk prepared similar to venison, which in turn is similar to beef. Red meat is red meat. Seasoning and marinades may vary, according to taste.

    Some people like to stifle any gamey taste. And grilling is always good with a red meat, and probably healthier if you don't char it. I don't have any experience cooking elk, only eating it. I would recommend experimenting, and letting your taste guide you.

    Cube it and you may have invented "Elk Bourguignon". Or make a simple elk stew. My friends had their local butcher make elk sausages. My Native American friends would pan fry it in thin strips. It's a meat - you have countless options.