resting heart rate

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    Apr 05, 2007 2:27 AM GMT
    does anyone know what the average heart rate for an adult is ? I'm talking about heart rate in rest.

    I'm 27, and i do a bunch of cardio, but my heart rate in rest is around 100, which seems to be a lot. So if i want to train aerobic at around 70% it feels like im doing absolutely nothing (a light jog at 8 mph), but i do break a sweat after 30 minutes or so :)
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    Apr 06, 2007 9:00 PM GMT
    The average range for a resting heart rate is pretty wide. Its between 60 and 100. I would say yours is still within the normal range. With more training that rate should go down as your heart gets more efficient with each stroke. As for your heart rate at 70% of max not feeling very hard, it is okay to push beyond that as long as you feel like you're within your limits or could keep that pace for an hour or so. The only reasons to go beyond that are if you were training specifically for a hard aerobic or anaerobic race and it required you to get to your max. Overall you are fine and healthy and I wouldn't worry too much about it.
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    Apr 06, 2007 9:37 PM GMT
    Well, 100 seems high to me, but that might be because you took it standing up, and were stressed for some reason, both factors that will really elevate your heart rate.

    Try laying down, or sitting down, and staying calm for a bit, and then take it.

    I am a distance runner (as well as weight trainer), and my resting heart rate can go from the mid 40s (when I am laying down, and if I am particularly relaxed, as after I have....well, we don't go there), to the 80s if I am nervous or stressed, to near 100 too if I am really nervous and standing.

    John
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    Apr 06, 2007 10:36 PM GMT
    Take your resting heart first thing in the morning, before you get out of bed. Before you do anything.

    Mine averages out at about 55bpm. I have friends you average 44 and some in the 60's.

    But the resting heart rate should be taken first thing in the morning, just after you wake, best time as you body is totally relaxed.
  • UStriathlete

    Posts: 320

    Apr 07, 2007 5:30 PM GMT
    RHR is different for everyone. Stress, hydration, and current fitness level effect RHR. Take it in am befor you get up and within 30mins of being up. RHR isn't a good marker on fitness, your lactate threshold is much better as well as precieved effort. for the average athlete check out mark allens website www.markallenonlince.com and use his MAT test to build endurance. good luck!
  • HotCoach

    Posts: 247

    Apr 07, 2007 8:26 PM GMT
    100 is very high. Mine is low 40s when I wake and am still in bed. Been into running for ovr 40 years. Suppose that helps too.
  • atxclimber

    Posts: 480

    Apr 08, 2007 1:01 AM GMT
    Yeah, mine's around 60, maybe a bit below, at rest, I think. As you continue to exercise it may drop a bit. Also, if you have a regular crystal meth habit, kicking that may help bring it down ;) (I kid, I kid.)

    My yoga practice and especially breathing exercises help control the heart rate, which is super useful when I'm biking when I need to keep my heart rate smooth. A simple exercise to do is to simply pay attention to the breath and gently lengthen the exhalations so they are twice as long as the inhalations. Don't stress about it, and don't be forceful, the breath should still be unhurried and smooth. But your heart rate drops during exhalations and accelerates during inhalations, so if you can practice longer exhalations for a while every day I've found it's a useful calming exercise. Or helps if I'm having trouble falling asleep.
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    Apr 10, 2007 10:26 PM GMT
    Just so you know, you don't want your resting heartrate to get too low, which can happen through lots of excercising, specifically swimming. We had a guy pass out and die, due to hittin his head on something, because his heart was in such great condition that his heartrate sometimes went into the 40's. While its fantastic to have a low heartrate, you do also have to be careful.

    Kyle
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    Apr 11, 2007 2:50 AM GMT
    ??? Exercising too much can lower your resting heart rate so much taht you pass out??? What in the world are you talking about?

    For adults, resting heart rate above 100 bpm is considered tachycardic, usualy a sign of some pathology or artificially induced (again, that is for average adults.) Younger population and much older population would have higher resting HR. Male lower resting HR than female, athletes lower than non-athletes. Average restign HR is around 70's. HR slower than 60's is considered brachycardic, but unless around and below 40's, usually no symptons. Some athelets with resting HR in the 50's or 60's are not considered pathological.

    Please do not perpetuate such wild and ignorant misinformation if you do not know what y ouare talking about!
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    Apr 11, 2007 2:56 AM GMT
    For Sandberg...

    You are 27. Resting HR for adolecents can be between 80's to 100... But you are not an adolescent anymore...

    You really should go see your doctor.
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    Apr 12, 2007 10:05 PM GMT
    Dude, are you kidding, I knew the kid. There was no other explanation for why he was fainting, he had just woken up and was going to swimming practice. Having a heart rate in the 40's is nearly impossible to get too anyway, you have to excessively swim. It just one of those things I thought should be said. Having a heart rate that low could be like taking to many blood thinners, think about it.
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    Apr 13, 2007 1:41 AM GMT
    You knew him but you made the diagnosis of what his symptons were???

    Too low a resting heart rates is like taking too much blood thinner??? You are making a corelation between a persons' resting HR and the blood INR values???

    Pleae stop spreading such misinformation.

    Talk to your doctor and get your facts straight, PLEASE.

    It is irresponsible to put on such information that you have no clue waht you are talking about.
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    Apr 13, 2007 1:44 AM GMT
    He could be faiting from low blood sugar, he is fit so he is not likely orthostatic hypotensive, there can be many many reasons why he felt fait. I asure you it is not his low HR. Many atheltes do have low HR in the 40's.

    Just because he felt faint does not make his RH responsible.. "It can't be anything else".. Please do not make daignosis for him.
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    Apr 13, 2007 2:39 AM GMT
    I agree with the last post.

    In competitive running, there would be instances in which, after a race, I had my pulse/blood pressure checked....and they would often go into a very deep ebb. You wouldn't figure that to be the case, after a major race effort.

    But what was going on was that I was in a state of low blood sugar, essentially hypoglaecemic. And I felt faint...and a couple of instances in which this happened I had to sit down and put my head between my knees.

    So in my case, the low blood sugar was probably responsible or tied too my low pulse/heart rate at the time, which was in the high 40s (after a race).

    So my question is, is the guy eating breakfast when he gets up.

    John
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    Apr 13, 2007 2:45 AM GMT
    You are a VERy fit man Fastprof! Many guys in their 20's can use your resting HR!

    I just don't want people to get the wrong idea nad stop working out due to unfounded fear of low resting HR. Low resting HR is actually considered a sign of health and fitness.
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    Apr 13, 2007 2:50 AM GMT
    I also wanted to make sure people see their doctors if they are concerned about their heath or found to have any questionable symptons instead of perpetuating misinformation.

    And the referrence to blood thinners with low restign HR is just.., I cant even get into that...! The effects and biopathways of warfarin on the body is very complex.
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    Jun 08, 2007 2:34 PM GMT
    I know I'm about 39, which at 19 and a runner is fairly normal, I think. I know Dean Karnazes is 39, but I AM curious when and if a person can get "too low"
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    Jun 08, 2007 4:08 PM GMT
    Too low would be when you are symptomatic, or if your heart stops which, in a well conditioned athlete, would probably be from something NOT directly related to the pulse. A person in their 80's who had a pulse in the 40's would probably be symptomatic and be a candidate for a pacemaker, but this is do to the fact that their hearts are wearing out. In a young conditioned, or any conditioned person, the heart pumps that slow because it can pump enough blood for the body at that slow rate, and not from any defect -- usually such a person's vascular resistance, against which the heart pumps, is low as well. A pule of 39 in the well conditioned young male is not uncommon and I've heard of people being down in the 20's, rare, without having any medical problems but just great cardiovascular shape.
    While pulse can vary, Sandberg 79, I would be slightly worried if you are in good shape at your age, and your resting pulse really is about 100. My intuition would be that in someone your age and well conditioned the pulse should be lower. If you are measuring it correctly and it is that high, then you probably should be checked out by a physician. While you will probably be fine it doesn't hurt to make sure.
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    Feb 06, 2016 12:22 AM GMT
    Is a resting heart rate of 72 BPM dangerous?
    I work out 5x a week, 2 hrs per sesson with 30 mins of cardio
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    Feb 06, 2016 5:36 AM GMT
    Fluctuates between 38-42. As someone mentioned earlier lactate threshold is a better parameter of fitness.
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    Feb 06, 2016 11:39 AM GMT
    Jameelio saidIs a resting heart rate of 72 BPM dangerous?
    I work out 5x a week, 2 hrs per sesson with 30 mins of cardio
    Not as dangerous as 0 BPM.
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    Feb 06, 2016 7:43 PM GMT
    paulflexes said
    Jameelio saidIs a resting heart rate of 72 BPM dangerous?
    I work out 5x a week, 2 hrs per sesson with 30 mins of cardio
    Not as dangerous as 0 BPM.


    Thank you so much for your helpful adviceicon_idea.gif
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    Feb 10, 2016 11:47 PM GMT
    Jameelio said
    paulflexes said
    Jameelio saidIs a resting heart rate of 72 BPM dangerous?
    I work out 5x a week, 2 hrs per sesson with 30 mins of cardio
    Not as dangerous as 0 BPM.


    Thank you so much for your helpful adviceicon_idea.gif
    You're very welcome! icon_biggrin.gif

    Oh, and my resting heart rate is usually between 50-60 BPM, and my last checkup (Aug 2015) the doc told me I have the health of a guy in his early 20's...not including eyesight.
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    Feb 15, 2016 3:12 PM GMT
    I tend to be a little over-obsessed at times with my pulse. As a guy who does a lot of cardio, I feel like it should be down in the 50s or lower. When I'm completely relaxed (ie the middle of the night), I can catch it pretty low ... sub-60.

    But when I'm going about my day, it is always at least 70 and often 80-plus when I get my pulse taken at my yearly physical (pulse anxiety perhaps). When I climbed Denali/Mount McKinley this year, my pulse was monitored closely and above 17K feet, I don't think it dropped below 100 at all. Which was a little higher than most of my teammates but not alarmingly so.

    So anyway, I wouldn't worry too much about resting pulse rate. Overall fitness and performance are much better indicators. As in how long can you sustain your maximum heart rate? If you're ready to drop after a half mile jog, that's when you should start worrying about heart health.

    My 2 cents.

  • Edepic

    Posts: 84

    Feb 17, 2016 3:08 AM GMT
    When I was an anxious 24 year old, my statistics class had everyone take their pulse over the weekend. My pulse was usually 100. This was the fastest pulse rate in the class of 100. I was not doing cardio at the time.
    I started working out seriously at 30. In a short while my resting pulse dropped to arround 60. It has remained there for 44 years. Forty four very physically active years.
    Good luck!