Had 2 Out-Patient Procedures This Morning, Now Back Home, Feeling Great - And Told Today CANCER FREE!

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    Dec 12, 2017 4:56 PM GMT
    ALERT: This medical subject may be unpleasant for some. And perhaps of no personal interest for younger guys.

    Had a "double entry" at 8 this morning, under anesthesia. It was administered IV, not with a mask. The latter always knocks me out for a day, often with a sore throat. I woke up an hour later totally alert, home now just typing away. But my husband did drive me home, the doctors insist upon it, as different people react differently.

    The colonoscopy revealed some polyps they removed for biopsy. Often benign, and not uncommon in men over 50. I had no symptoms or indications of them, just something that should be checked with age. I get the biopsy results in 2 weeks. They also confirmed diverticulitis, which had been presumed due to other symptoms I have.

    The second procedure was an endoscopy (exam through the throat to the stomach). It showed exactly what I suspected, what I could actually feel when I ate or even drank liquids. A "ring" of tissue (medically a 'stenosis', meaning narrowing) that was partially blocking the esophagus just above the stomach. Likely damage from the acid reflux I was diagnosed as already having over 12 years ago.

    But it's size did not require surgery at this time. Instead the doctor inserted an inflatable balloon to expand the area. We'll monitor it for a recurrence, maybe eventually requiring surgery. The doctor also took some stomach samples for additional biopsy, but everything looked OK.

    They said I could begin eating immediately when I returned home today, and did I ever, after 2 days of total fasting. I can actually feel the improvement in my esophagus. I finished a big lunch at 10, skipping breakfast altogether. Many people I've spoken with say the pre-op prep is much tougher than the actual procedure, and I agree. But I'd still encourage guys "of a certain age" to consider this as a useful part of good preventive medicine.
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    Dec 12, 2017 7:25 PM GMT
    UPDATE: I just now read the entire doctor's report, in my discharge packet. What I reported above was what he told me in the recovery area.

    Turns out I also have a small hiatal hernia. How that came to light I have no idea. Gotta find out what the consequences of that are when I do the 2-week follow-up. Also read that the diverticulitis is rather extensive. That would certainly match my recent symptoms. Will need some advice about that, too.

    But overall I'm still pleased. Especially about the widening of my esophagus, which was beginning to cause difficulties eating and even drinking. It was like having a clogged kitchen drain inside me, and at times quite painful when food got lodged down there. Fortunately it was far enough below the trachea that breathing was unaffected.

    I always preach taking care of health issues quickly, but on that one I may have been a little slow to act upon.
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    Dec 13, 2017 3:42 AM GMT


    When I had my upper GI, at an endoscopy clinic, back in Jan 2009, I remember the patients who got a colonoscopy. While you are out (on Propofol), before they insert the camera and tubes into your butt, they fill you up with air, that is how they are able to get the best pictures of your colon, by expanding it

    In recovery section after procedure, behind closed curtains, you could hear these patients "get deflated", the nurse pushes on the stomach to expel the air and of course the whole room sounds like a bunch of men farting or having a diarrhea attack at the same time

    It was very funny.......



    Just a side note, Incontinence happened to my friend after this procedure





    After seeing my friends Incontinence, I did the new "FIT" test which checks for cancer, blood and more in the stool





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    Dec 13, 2017 4:45 AM GMT
    Thanks for that info. As for the FIT test, I believe it only reliably detects active cancer, less so for cells in a precanerous condition. Benign polyps can turn cancerous. Only removing them for biopsy will not only detect cancer, but precancerous cells as well, as it was explained to me. That warrant a more careful follow-up regimen. But I did hear that video state FIT does detect both cells - my doctor might not fully agree.

    As for the farting - yes, you are inflated with air, so the scope can better view your expanded intestinal track. In recovery the nurse told me to expect to be farting, which I already knew. Although she didn't knead my stomach or do anything to help it along.

    What did surprise me, however, was her use of that term. I would have thought medical people would say flatulence, or the euphemistic passing gas or something. But like with your experience, this clinic mostly performs these kinds of exams, and perhaps people today wouldn't understand anything but the word fart. I was just a little taken aback by the crudity of her statement.
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    Dec 13, 2017 5:03 AM GMT
    Oh, BTW, in the past my primary doctor has provided me the stuff to do a FIT test at home. Except instead of toilet tissue to collect the stool, I was given what's called a "top hat" made of plastic for the toilet seat. From there you extract the small sample for the vial. But I found the concept too gross, and my specialist said a colonoscopy is more reliable and reveals other conditions. Such as diverticulitis, as was discovered in my case.

    Still, I wouldn't oppose what your doctor advises is best for you. And the FIT is better than doing nothing at all, and certainly less intimidating than a colonoscopy.
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    Dec 14, 2017 8:04 PM GMT
    art_deco saidOh, BTW, in the past my primary doctor has provided me the stuff to do a FIT test at home. Except instead of toilet tissue to collect the stool, I was given what's called a "top hat" made of plastic for the toilet seat. From there you extract the small sample for the vial. But I found the concept too gross, and my specialist said a colonoscopy is more reliable and reveals other conditions. Such as diverticulitis, as was discovered in my case.

    Still, I wouldn't oppose what your doctor advises is best for you. And the FIT is better than doing nothing at all, and certainly less intimidating than a colonoscopy.




    I had an old, used for ice cream, plastic 5 quart pail under my kitchen sink, I used that to poop in as you cant get your stool wet in water. After poking my poop several spots with the applicator tip, put the cap on mixes with chemical solution in the little bottle, I dumped turd into toilet and just rinsed out the bucket.

    I would much rather do this, get the same results than an invasive colonoscopy and risk incontinence. My friend that came to visit here in LA stayed over night and heard he was in and out of the bathroom, peeing, like 6-7 times during the night icon_eek.gif

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    Dec 15, 2017 7:38 PM GMT
    An Update: Got a phone call today while having lunch at a restaurant. My doctor’s office wanted me to know, prior to my scheduled post-op follow-up visit, that all the tests returned negative results for cancer. They had biopsied some intestinal polyps, and some tissue samples from my stomach.

    Turned our lunch into a little celebration. I thought the call was a nice gesture on the part of my doctor’s office. I’ll still keep the follow-up, there are some other less critical issues I’d like to discuss.
  • Plooje

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    Dec 18, 2017 5:28 PM GMT
    art_deco saidAn Update: Got a phone call today while having lunch at a restaurant. My doctor’s office wanted me to know, prior to my scheduled post-op follow-up visit, that all the tests returned negative results for cancer. They had biopsied some intestinal polyps, and some tissue samples from my stomach.

    Turned our lunch into a little celebration. I thought the call was a nice gesture on the part of my doctor’s office. I’ll still keep the follow-up, there are some other less critical issues I’d like to discuss.


    See, government run, single payer health care courtesy of the VA works!
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    Dec 21, 2017 3:13 PM GMT
    Plooje said
    art_deco said
    An Update: Got a phone call today while having lunch at a restaurant. My doctor’s office wanted me to know, prior to my scheduled post-op follow-up visit, that all the tests returned negative results for cancer. They had biopsied some intestinal polyps, and some tissue samples from my stomach.

    Turned our lunch into a little celebration. I thought the call was a nice gesture on the part of my doctor’s office. I’ll still keep the follow-up, there are some other less critical issues I’d like to discuss.

    See, government run, single payer health care courtesy of the VA works!

    False. I used private doctors. Not the VA. I wouldn't trust the VA in Florida to clip my toenails. But the VA in other US States was excellent, it was all I used for 12 years.

    Although totally free if I used the VA, instead I paid 5 figures to have Florida's top-rated private radiation oncologist treat my cancer 6 years ago. That amount was just my Medicare co-pay. His actual fee was 6 figures.

    When it comes to my health, or my husband's, I choose the best. When he had his heart bypass it was done by the head of Florida's premier cardiology hospital. He had urinary surgery a few months ago, for which I chose the Head of Surgery in our best hospital.

    The problem with the VA, which I can use for free, is that it's been underfunded by Congress since the early 2000s. Leading to various scandals, but no real improvement. I won't go near it. When it comes to our health, I insist on selecting our own providers, that you can't do in the VA. Hell, half the doctors don't speak English today, you need a translator when you go there.

    But that isn't the same system as the UK and Canada has. The VA is more like what I had in the US Army. Where the doctor is to whomever you get assigned. Some good, some dreadful. In the VA today, at least in Florida, it's mostly dreadful.

    That isn't how all public health care in other countries operates. Nor need operate in the US. A myth perpetrated by the US Right Wing.
  • Plooje

    Posts: 2276

    Dec 29, 2017 11:20 PM GMT
    art_deco said
    Plooje said
    art_deco said
    An Update: Got a phone call today while having lunch at a restaurant. My doctor’s office wanted me to know, prior to my scheduled post-op follow-up visit, that all the tests returned negative results for cancer. They had biopsied some intestinal polyps, and some tissue samples from my stomach.

    Turned our lunch into a little celebration. I thought the call was a nice gesture on the part of my doctor’s office. I’ll still keep the follow-up, there are some other less critical issues I’d like to discuss.

    See, government run, single payer health care courtesy of the VA works!

    False. I used private doctors. Not the VA. I wouldn't trust the VA in Florida to clip my toenails. But the VA in other US States was excellent, it was all I used for 12 years.

    Although totally free if I used the VA, instead I paid 5 figures to have Florida's top-rated private radiation oncologist treat my cancer 6 years ago. That amount was just my Medicare co-pay. His actual fee was 6 figures.

    When it comes to my health, or my husband's, I choose the best. When he had his heart bypass it was done by the head of Florida's premier cardiology hospital. He had urinary surgery a few months ago, for which I chose the Head of Surgery in our best hospital.

    The problem with the VA, which I can use for free, is that it's been underfunded by Congress since the early 2000s. Leading to various scandals, but no real improvement. I won't go near it. When it comes to our health, I insist on selecting our own providers, that you can't do in the VA. Hell, half the doctors don't speak English today, you need a translator when you go there.

    But that isn't the same system as the UK and Canada has. The VA is more like what I had in the US Army. Where the doctor is to whomever you get assigned. Some good, some dreadful. In the VA today, at least in Florida, it's mostly dreadful.

    That isn't how all public health care in other countries operates. Nor need operate in the US. A myth perpetrated by the US Right Wing.



    So how are we supposed to all embrace government-run health care when you - a proponent of it - refuse to use it?

    You think the government would do an even "better" job if they were in charge of EVERYONE's health care? And I am talking about health CARE, not health INSURANCE. Because "single payer" is the government completely taking over the private health CARE system that we still have today. Doctors, hospitals and pharmacies on the government payroll, paid exactly how much the government decides.

    Just like the VA that you refused to go to.