Dunning–Kruger effect

  • metta

    Posts: 43528

    Jan 19, 2018 4:20 AM GMT
    Dunning–Kruger effect

    "In the field of psychology, the Dunning–Kruger effect is a cognitive bias wherein people of low ability suffer from illusory superiority, mistakenly assessing their cognitive ability as greater than it is. The cognitive bias of illusory superiority derives from the metacognitive inability of low-ability persons to recognize their own ineptitude; without the self-awareness of metacognition, low-ability people cannot objectively evaluate their actual competence or incompetence.[1]

    As described by social psychologists David Dunning and Justin Kruger, the cognitive bias of illusory superiority results from an internal illusion in people of low ability and from an external misperception in people of high ability; that is, "the miscalibration of the incompetent stems from an error about the self, whereas the miscalibration of the highly competent stems from an error about others."[1]

    Conversely, highly competent individuals may erroneously presume that tasks easy for them to perform are also easy for other people to perform, or that other people will have a similar understanding of subjects that they themselves are well-versed in.[2]"

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunning%E2%80%93Kruger_effect


    http://alturl.com/q5ypz
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    Jan 19, 2018 6:31 AM GMT
    Is It Pretentious to Cite the Dunning-Kruger Effect?

    What does it mean when someone mentions the D-K effect? If I wrote, say, “many people suffer from the Dunning-Kruger effect” on Facebook, am I saying that I’m smarter than those many people? Would writing that make me pretentious?

    Even writing this piece feels pretentious, because in doing so, I’m kind of saying that I’m not an individual that suffers from illusory superiority. But saying that, to me, is evidence that maybe I do.

    https://tinyurl.com/y85r6uha
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    Jan 19, 2018 10:36 AM GMT

    Something I've learned is that different people are good at different things.

    Some are thinking people, some are hands-on.
    Some are good at maths, others are better with words.
    Some are good at sports, others are good at making things.

    Its up to you to find out what you are good at.
  • outdoorsmuscl...

    Posts: 1944

    Jan 19, 2018 2:00 PM GMT
    Why does Trump think so much of himself? It’s called the Dunning-Kruger effect.
    Basically, it’s a cognitive bias wherein people who are relatively less intelligent are really bad at evaluating intelligence
    because the skill set required to do that is part of the cognitive ability they lack.

    The end result among the less intelligent is a belief that they are more intelligent than is accurate. Sound like someone we know?

    http://thefrayground.com/donald-trump-and-the-dunning-kruger-effect/













    Bodycontactau said
    Something I've learned is that different people are good at different things.

    Some are thinking people, some are hands-on.
    Some are good at maths, others are better with words.
    Some are good at sports, others are good at making things.

    Its up to you to find out what you are good at.
  • bro4bro

    Posts: 1919

    Jan 19, 2018 6:25 PM GMT
    So, how many people experience the Dunning-Kruger effect?
    Or maybe a better question is... who doesn't?
    I mean, how many people have you ever met who don't overestimate their own cognitive ability?
    Illusory superiority seems to be a fundamental attribute of the human condition.
    I'm guessing Dunning and Kruger were prime candidates themselves.
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    Jan 21, 2018 2:17 PM GMT
    Thank you for explaining whats wrong with so many Liberals.
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    Jan 22, 2018 1:19 AM GMT
    I think this applies to everyone who is learning something new:

    You start optimistic because you don't know what you don't know. Once you advance in your studies and you begin to know what you don't know yet, you can better grasp how ignorant you still are.
  • bro4bro

    Posts: 1919

    Jan 22, 2018 6:29 PM GMT
    Yep Bachian that's a very good point.

    One thing I've noticed working in technology (I've worked in the oil, computer, and aerospace industries) is that people who are experts in a given field are very aware of the limitations of their own technologies - but they tend to vastly overestimate the capabilities of technologies they know little about. They believe people working in fields other than their own can perform miracles.

    Hollywood certainly doesn't help in this regard. They're very quick to attribute magical properties to technology even in movies that aren't ostensibly science fiction, if it's a convenient way to further the plot. But of course the people making the movies have no real knowledge of what they're writing about; they're just making shit up.