New Jersey man, 27, found dead inside a tanning bed at a Crunch Fitness gym

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    Jan 26, 2018 9:59 PM GMT

    Wow, when its your time, its your time, def one of the more bizarre stories about death

    I wonder what could have caused his death? Those tanning beds are wired to shut off in case of water or electric shock, electric shock is the only thing that comes to mind, this would be the first death inside a tanning bed? I think we have all tried one in our life icon_eek.gif





    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5317811/New-Jersey-man-dead-Crunch-Fitness-tanning-bed.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490




    Nicholas Ricigliani, 27, was found dead at the gym in Hamilton, New Jersey
    Gym employees found him inside the tanning bed on Monday, police say
    No foul play is suspected and an autopsy will determine his cause of death



    489C212A00000578-5317811-image-a-21_1516
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    Jan 26, 2018 10:41 PM GMT
    Could be any number of causes. Heat comes to mind. People also die in saunas and steam rooms. Before using the tanning bed he may have just completed a strenous workout in the gym, which was the principle cause. Young people with undiagnosed heart problems can die during or following athletic exertion, even teenagers. The autopsy will hopefully provide the answer. A sad story for one so young.
  • interesting

    Posts: 858

    Jan 27, 2018 4:06 AM GMT
    ElnathB said
    ...this would be the first death inside a tanning bed? I think we have all tried one in our life...

    Proud to say I have never been in one, not a fan of tanning
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    Jan 27, 2018 4:55 AM GMT
    art_deco saidCould be any number of causes. Heat comes to mind. People also die in saunas and steam rooms. Before using the tanning bed he may have just completed a strenous workout in the gym, which was the principle cause. Young people with undiagnosed heart problems can die during or following athletic exertion, even teenagers. The autopsy will hopefully provide the answer. A sad story for one so young.




    This kind of death was in a scene in Final Destination 3, if you know this series, these people cheat deaths timeline (when its your karmic time to die, as in destiny) initially when circumstances intervene, eventually, death gets them in the end in the 'order' they were supposed to die before intervention

    I hate to show this video clip here, but this kind of death "only would happen in a movie", now its happened fro real, scary..

  • MuchoMasQueMu...

    Posts: 1468

    Jan 27, 2018 5:33 AM GMT
    LOL! Final Destination is such a trashy movie series yet I love it. God, it makes my skin crawl the way these people eventually succumb to some gruesome death. It's like an ongoing train wreck you hate looking at yet can't stop watching.

    This guy from New Jersey could have died from unrelated causes to a malfunctioning tanning bed. There are no details yet.
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    Jan 27, 2018 6:09 AM GMT
    I can't believe people still use tanning beds. So gross
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    Jan 27, 2018 12:49 PM GMT
    Radd said
    I can't believe people still use tanning beds. So gross

    I used them briefly. My late partner thought a Speedo tan line was hot, but I didn't have any tan line at all. All my outdoor swimming and brief sun bathing were done nude.

    So I enrolled in a tanning salon for a few months, that used beds, not booths. I did each session wearing 2 Speedos on top of each other, that I had for my public pool lap swims, to block the rays. Plus I applied sunblock on my skin under them. Used only a moisturizer on the rest of me.

    I quickly got a well-defined Speedo tan line, that my partner thought was sexy. What we do for love... icon_rolleyes.gif

    BTW, no swimsuit line today, back to going au naturel when swimming. Except for a Florida tan, due to almost constant wearing of shorts and short-sleeve shirts. I do alternate open sandals with different strap designs to avoid sharp patterns on my feet. But no tanning bed use, in order to even out this inadvertent clothing tan, which remains darker due to near daily sun exposure.
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    Jan 27, 2018 1:56 PM GMT
    Tans look great, and that's why most young men want to have them. Unfortunately, there is no way to get a tann without exposing oneself to either UV-A or UV-B rays. Ever present danger of skin cancer or dried wrinkly skin later in life.
  • outdoorsmuscl...

    Posts: 2465

    Jan 27, 2018 2:16 PM GMT
    Tanning beds should be illegal. Tanning does nothing good for anyone. It is just a money maker for clubs that is contrary to good health.
    The World Health Organization states that ultraviolet tanning beds cause cancer. The International Agency for Research on Cancer considers indoor tanning a Class 1 carcinogen. After a new study appeared in the British Medical Journal Tuesday linking tanning beds not only to deadly melanoma but to other types of skin cancers, experts urge ramping up prevention measures.

    An editorial by Simon Nicholas Williams, clinical research associate from Northwestern University in Chicago, published Tuesday alongside the study in BMJ urges the European Union to take stronger action against tanning beds, noting that Northern Ireland has recently joined the UK in passing legislation prohibiting people under the age of 18 from indoor tanning.

    http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/health/tanning-beds-banned-article-1.1173807

    MuchoMasQueMusculo saidLOL! Final Destination is such a trashy movie series yet I love it. God, it makes my skin crawl the way these people eventually succumb to some gruesome death. It's like an ongoing train wreck you hate looking at yet can't stop watching.

    This guy from New Jersey could have died from unrelated causes to a malfunctioning tanning bed. There are no details yet.
  • outdoorsmuscl...

    Posts: 2465

    Jan 27, 2018 2:28 PM GMT
    A tan either from a tanning bed or from the sun is a major turnoff . It turns your skin into leather destroys collagen.... Leather-Skin.jpg
    bad_tan_fail_fake_tan_funny_056.jpg

    Radd saidI can't believe people still use tanning beds. So gross
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 18237

    Jan 27, 2018 2:46 PM GMT
    I have no intentions of ever using a tanning bed. These things are a major health hazard as far as I am concerned.
  • outdoorsmuscl...

    Posts: 2465

    Jan 27, 2018 3:22 PM GMT
    It's hard to believe, but there are still people dying (and I mean this quite literally) for a tan. Tanning booths, unaffectionately referred to as cancer booths by fellow dermatologists, are a thriving source of bronzed—and damaged—skin.

    Never mind that the United States Department of Health and Human Services and the World Health Organization's International Agency of Research on Cancer panel have declared ultraviolet radiation from the sun, and artificial sources—think tanning beds and sun lamps—to be a known carcinogen. Or that the Skin Cancer Foundation found that people who first use a tanning bed before age 35 increase their risk for melanoma by a whopping 75 percent. Or even that a study in JAMA Dermatology revealed that the number of skin cancer cases due to tanning is higher than the number of lung cancer cases due to smoking.

    In spite of these frightening facts, people still use tanning beds. According to the American Academy of Dermatology, 35 percent of American adults, 59 percent of college students, and 17 percent of teens have reported using a tanning bed in their lifetime. Doctors, those affected by skin cancer, and concerned citizens have lobbied with some great success to restrict these cancer-causing machines. Some victories:

    California, Delaware, the District of Columbia, Hawaii, Illinois, Louisiana, Minnesota, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Texas, and Vermont have passed laws that prohibit minors under the age of 18 from indoor tanning. Oregon and Washington have passed laws prohibiting minors under the age of 18 from using indoor tanning devices, unless a prescription is provided. Connecticut, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania have passed legislation banning minors under the age of 17 from using tanning devices.

    By 2015, more than 40 U.S. states had introduced stricter regulations to limit indoor tanning, especially among minors.

    That being said, we still have a long way to go. A recent study in the journal Translational Behavioral Medicine: Practice, Policy, Research showed that when 365 non-Hispanic women between the ages of 18 and 30 were surveyed in Washington D.C., most were not in favor of completely banning the tan.

    But here's the thing: All the participants had used a tanning booth at least once in the past year. So...there may be a little bias. Had the researchers asked dermatologists, oncologists, or mourning family members who have lost their loved ones to skin cancer, the outcome would likely be quite different.

    Even one indoor tanning session can increase users' risk of developing squamous cell carcinoma by 67 percent and basal cell carcinoma by 29 percent. All it takes is one time.That's why the American Academy of Dermatology opposes indoor tanning and supports a ban on the production and sale of indoor tanning equipment.

    https://www.fitnessmagazine.com/health/conditions/ban-tanning-beds/



    roadbikeRob saidI have no intentions of ever using a tanning bed. These things are a major health hazard as far as I am concerned.
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    Jan 27, 2018 5:06 PM GMT
    Tanning... HA! You guys are funny!
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    Jan 27, 2018 8:36 PM GMT
    NEDC12 said
    Tanning... HA! You guys are funny!

    Indeed this would be to you. But to us White guys this is an issue. It’s theorized we were evolved in northern lands and forested terrain where our distant ancestors adapted to less light than Africa, the presently assumed birthplace of the human race.

    So that we Whites can have a problem with strong sunlight on our skins. And for cultural reasons we may value a tan, or no tan.

    In past times a tan was deemed the coarse mark of common outdoor workers, while lighter skin meant you were among the privileged elite. Today there is a different, and more complex view of this matter among Whites. Concerns about skin cancer & aging are now factors, too.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 18237

    Jan 27, 2018 8:38 PM GMT
    The last time I laid out in the sun was late last August and it was only for one hour. I got very bored and just gathered up everything and left. That was the only time that I laid out in the sun with sun block of course. Sun bathing doesn't do anything for me anymore and I consider it a waste of time. Why not go for a run, do some serious cycling, or find something else productive to do rather than just lay out in some public park and get bit by flies and other insect pests. Buffalo is among the worst cities for male eye candy as far as sun tanning outdoors is concerned. The piss poor male eye candy at our Lake Erie beaches leaves a lot to be desired and is a further disincentive to visit and sun bath. So the sun tanning lotion I have doesn't get much use, that was a waste of moneyicon_razz.gif

    But I wouldn't be caught dead in one of those ghastly, toxic indoor tanning beds, no thank youicon_exclaim.gificon_razz.gif
  • NOLAman13

    Posts: 59

    Jan 29, 2018 6:39 AM GMT
    Tanning is so passé. It does not give off a “healthy glow”. It’s just a color adjustment which no one really needs.
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    Jan 29, 2018 1:58 PM GMT
    NOLAman13 said
    Tanning is so passé. It does not give off a “healthy glow”. It’s just a color adjustment which no one really needs.

    It's so passé that noting that is now also passé. Like a full generation behind the curve.

    But these things must be taken in an historical perspective. In the past very pale skin was seen as an unhealthy sign, and in some cases even today, for valid medical reasons, can still be.

    However, deliberate tanning doesn't make a White person healthier, but merely LOOKING healthier (except in certain vitamin deficiency instances). But coming at the risk of other medical problems, like skin cancer, and masking genuine health issues, plus it can cause premature skin aging.

    On balance, I believe modern medical science demonstrates that excessive sun exposure is unhealthy, especially for the light-skinned, and should be avoided. But some old cultural norms linger, just like smoking does. Science and culture do no always agree.
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    Jan 29, 2018 9:03 PM GMT
    outdoorsmuscleguy saidA tan either from a tanning bed or from the sun is a major turnoff . It turns your skin into leather destroys collagen.... Leather-Skin.jpg
    bad_tan_fail_fake_tan_funny_056.jpg

    Radd saidI can't believe people still use tanning beds. So gross



    Yeah, I hate deliberate tanning. But the truth of the matter is that we are not Mole People. We were created to live in the sunshine, not underground. This is where we get our Vitamin D and many diseases are being attributed to our lack of Vitamin D. So on one hand, we really do need a certain amount of sunshine to be healthy. But on the other hand, studies have shown a very clear correlation between sun exposure and skin cancer. For example, people in the U.S. normally get skin cancers on the left side of their faces and bodies, while countries with the steering wheel on the right side of their vehicles get skin cancer on the right side. So why does the sun cause us to contract diseases if it's what our bodies require? I really don't know the answer to this but I personally believe it's got to do with what humans have done to our environment and the protective layers of our atmosphere and ozone have been depleted as a result. So I personally wear sunscreen when outdoors but I do go outside without it when I know I'm only going to be out for a short period of time. I will also lie out without sunscreen on the first warm day of spring to allow my body to absorb nutrients.
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    Jan 29, 2018 10:04 PM GMT
    With my pale skin colour I definitely look better with a slight tan. Still, I would never use a tanning bed. I knew a woman who owned a tanning salon and she actually died of skin cancer. I can still vividly recall the time I asked her if she was ever worried about skin cancer! ("No, I'm careful..." Etc). icon_rolleyes.gif

    Tomorrow I'm having stitches removed where the doc had to snip away a mole. The mole, when tested, "was not quite benign" (lol) so they cut more skin off around it. Sun damage catches up to you.

    If anyone wants to see how much skin damage they REALLY have just look at yourself in a bathroom with the a black light bulb replacing the regular bulb. I was stunned; the otherwise invisible marks suddenly appeared. I had more dark patches than a cheetah and so did most of the other people who came up in.
  • trixareforkid...

    Posts: 144

    Jan 30, 2018 12:34 AM GMT
    It's always a the pasty shut-ins, who don't ever get off the computer, who conveniently dislike tans icon_lol.gif
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    Jan 30, 2018 4:35 AM GMT
    YVRguy saidWith my pale skin colour I definitely look better with a slight tan. Still, I would never use a tanning bed. I knew a woman who owned a tanning salon and she actually died of skin cancer. I can still vividly recall the time I asked her if she was ever worried about skin cancer! ("No, I'm careful..." Etc). icon_rolleyes.gif

    Tomorrow I'm having stitches removed where the doc had to snip away a mole. The mole, when tested, "was not quite benign" (lol) so they cut more skin off around it. Sun damage catches up to you.

    If anyone wants to see how much skin damage they REALLY have just look at yourself in a bathroom with the a black light bulb replacing the regular bulb. I was stunned; the otherwise invisible marks suddenly appeared. I had more dark patches than a cheetah and so did most of the other people who came up in.



    I worked outdoors for several years so a few years ago, I finally went to the dermatologist and had some removed as well. I was absolutely shocked at how deep they cut into your face! When I saw the crater I literally gasped. I didn't believe him when he said it would go away, but four years later and there is absolutely no sign of where he cut them out. But much of that is because I wear sunblock. And something I learned a long time ago is if you want to prevent scarring, don't allow the wound to get any sun exposure at all for a solid year.
  • Unity123

    Posts: 1922

    Jan 30, 2018 4:55 AM GMT
    You all worry too much. One of my uncles died on the golf course at age 88.

    Was it the sun that killed him? Or the cigarettes he’d smoke, or the after golf scotch on the rocks and cheeseburger with fries he’d enjoy over his long life?

    He never worried about such things. He dropped bombs over Germany in WWII, and I’m sure those flights put death in its prosper perspective for him.

    We’re all going to die some day. In the meantime....we get to live.

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    Jan 30, 2018 6:09 AM GMT
    art_deco said
    NOLAman13 said
    Tanning is so passé. It does not give off a “healthy glow”. It’s just a color adjustment which no one really needs.

    It's so passé that noting that is now also passé. Like a full generation behind the curve.

    But these things must be taken in an historical perspective. In the past very pale skin was seen as an unhealthy sign, and in some cases even today, for valid medical reasons, can still be.

    However, deliberate tanning doesn't make a White person healthier, but merely LOOKING healthier (except in certain vitamin deficiency instances). But coming at the risk of other medical problems, like skin cancer, and masking genuine health issues, plus it can cause premature skin aging.

    On balance, I believe modern medical science demonstrates that excessive sun exposure is unhealthy, especially for the light-skinned, and should be avoided. But some old cultural norms linger, just like smoking does. Science and culture do no always agree.


    There is a cultural aspect to tanning also, and it goes in and out of fashion like anything else. A tan used to be looked down upon as low class and characteristic of people who labored outdoors at menial jobs, while being pale was in vogue with high society. Back in the 70's and 80's, a tan became associated with leisure, vacation, and people who spent time outdoors having fun, while being pale became associated with people who stayed indoors and had no life. I lived in coastal southern California for much of my life, and by the time I left about 5 years ago, parents had become almost comically hysterical about their children going outside for any amount of time without putting on sunscreen.
  • Jeepguy2

    Posts: 284

    Jan 30, 2018 10:24 AM GMT
    Tshirtnjeansguy said
    art_deco said
    NOLAman13 said
    Tanning is so passé. It does not give off a “healthy glow”. It’s just a color adjustment which no one really needs.

    It's so passé that noting that is now also passé. Like a full generation behind the curve.

    But these things must be taken in an historical perspective. In the past very pale skin was seen as an unhealthy sign, and in some cases even today, for valid medical reasons, can still be.

    However, deliberate tanning doesn't make a White person healthier, but merely LOOKING healthier (except in certain vitamin deficiency instances). But coming at the risk of other medical problems, like skin cancer, and masking genuine health issues, plus it can cause premature skin aging.

    On balance, I believe modern medical science demonstrates that excessive sun exposure is unhealthy, especially for the light-skinned, and should be avoided. But some old cultural norms linger, just like smoking does. Science and culture do no always agree.


    There is a cultural aspect to tanning also, and it goes in and out of fashion like anything else. A tan used to be looked down upon as low class and characteristic of people who labored outdoors at menial jobs, while being pale was in vogue with high society. Back in the 70's and 80's, a tan became associated with leisure, vacation, and people who spent time outdoors having fun, while being pale became associated with people who stayed indoors and had no life. I lived in coastal southern California for much of my life, and by the time I left about 5 years ago, parents had become almost comically hysterical about their children going outside for any amount of time without putting on sunscreen.


    Yep if you look at any of the old motor yachts built from the 1920s through about the end of the 1960s they all had awnings covering all of the decks so the rich folks who owned them could sit in the shade while cruising. The old beach houses all had screened in porches so people could sit in the shade and look at the ocean, but no sun decks anywhere. Back in the 1920s men's beachwear looked sorta like pajamas.

    The only people who got dark tans were farmers and laborers who worked outdoors. My grandfather who was born shortly after the turn of the 20th century was a bank executive and what was known back then as a "gentleman farmer" and when he worked on his hobby farm he always wore long sleeve shirts and a big straw hat to avoid getting any sun on himself.

    I remember one time I was down visiting him when and I was a teen and I was out driving his old tractor raking hay and took my shirt off and he came out to the field and said "Boy you are gonna burn up out there!" icon_lol.gif



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    Jan 30, 2018 10:52 AM GMT
    Tshirtnjeansguy said
    There is a cultural aspect to tanning also, and it goes in and out of fashion like anything else. A tan used to be looked down upon as low class and characteristic of people who labored outdoors at menial jobs, while being pale was in vogue with high society. Back in the 70's and 80's, a tan became associated with leisure, vacation, and people who spent time outdoors having fun, while being pale became associated with people who stayed indoors and had no life. I lived in coastal southern California for much of my life, and by the time I left about 5 years ago, parents had become almost comically hysterical about their children going outside for any amount of time without putting on sunscreen.

    In the 1950s and into the '60s I remember that acquiring some color in the middle of the snowy northern winter might be called a "Florida tan". Because decades earlier a Florida trip had become one of the few ways average Americans could experience summer temperatures & sun when much of the country was bundled up against the cold for several months.

    It also implied you had at least some disposable income to spend on the luxury of a distant vacation, and the free time to take it. And Florida was one of the few places in the US where you could find warm sun, sandy beaches with pleasant ocean water temps, and an entire infrastructure built around tourism. Definitely a social status marker for White people to bring that tan back home.

    It's true you could use sun lamps at health clubs and some beauty salons even in the 1930s, but they were almost exclusively in larger cities, and a luxury indulgence mainly for the wealthy. Unlike today, when spas are more affordable and widely available.

    My grandmother had her own home sunlamp, a large floor mounted contraption. It was stored in the attic after her death, and later in my teens I had one of my signature misadventures trying to use it. Suffered some serious burns that took months to heal, and nearly 2 years for the scars to fade.