World's Largest Offshore Wind Farm Could Send Power to Five Countries

  • metta

    Posts: 44480

    Jan 30, 2018 9:43 PM GMT
    World's Largest Offshore Wind Farm Could Send Power to Five Countries


    https://www.ecowatch.com/offshore-wind-farm-netherlands-2523620979.html
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4945

    Feb 01, 2018 6:25 AM GMT
    metta saidWorld's Largest Offshore Wind Farm Could Send Power to Five Countries


    https://www.ecowatch.com/offshore-wind-farm-netherlands-2523620979.html


    From the article:

    "Offshore wind farms typically use expensive underwater cables that convert the turbines' electric current into a type that electricity grids can use."

    Based on that one sentence, I would disregard the entire article. Cables, whether or not they are expensive, or whether or not they are underwater, do not convert anything. The remaining part of the sentence is also essentially meaningless. It is unmistakably clear that the author is scientifically challenged and knows nothing about the subject he is presumably writing about.

    Moreover, the wind does not blow continuously. Therefore, wind farms cannot generate continuous power. In fact, sometimes they generate very little power for weeks. Of course that is not important unless people expect to receive power at all times. Wind farms, unless they are combined with a power source that can be guaranteed to deliver power when the wind is not blowing, are not particularly useful. Eventually that fact will be generally recognized.
  • outdoorsmuscl...

    Posts: 2489

    Feb 01, 2018 9:57 PM GMT
    The Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC) released its flagship publication Global Wind Report: Annual Market Update at Windergy on 25 April in Delhi. More than 54 GW of clean renewable wind power was installed across the global market in 2016, which now comprises more than 90 countries, including 9 with more than 10,000 MW installed, and 29 which have now passed the 1,000 MW mark. Cumulative capacity grew by 12.6% to reach a total of 486.8 GW.

    “Wind power is now successfully competing with heavily subsidized incumbents across the globe, building new industries, creating hundreds of thousands of jobs and leading the way towards a clean energy future” said GWEC Secretary General Steve Sawyer. “We are well into a period of disruptive change, moving away from power systems centered on a few large, polluting plants towards markets increasingly dominated by a range of widely distributed renewable energy sources. We need to get to a zero emissions power system well before 2050 if we are to meet our climate change and development goals.”

    Wind power penetration levels continue to increase, led by Denmark pushing 40%, followed by Uruguay, Portugal and Ireland with well over 20%, Spain and Cyprus around 20%, Germany at 16%; and the big markets of China, the US and Canada get 4, 5.5, and 6% of their power from wind, respectively. GWEC’s rolling five year forecast sees almost 60 GW of new wind installations in 2017, rising to an annual market of about 75 GW by 2021, to bring cumulative installed capacity of over 800 GW by the end of 2021.



    https://www.ecowatch.com/offshore-wind-farm-netherlands-2523620979.html


    FRE0 said
    metta saidWorld's Largest Offshore Wind Farm Could Send Power to Five Countries


    https://www.ecowatch.com/offshore-wind-farm-netherlands-2523620979.html


    From the article:

    "Offshore wind farms typically use expensive underwater cables that convert the turbines' electric current into a type that electricity grids can use."

    Based on that one sentence, I would disregard the entire article. Cables, whether or not they are expensive, or whether or not they are underwater, do not convert anything. The remaining part of the sentence is also essentially meaningless. It is unmistakably clear that the author is scientifically challenged and knows nothing about the subject he is presumably writing about.

    Moreover, the wind does not blow continuously. Therefore, wind farms cannot generate continuous power. In fact, sometimes they generate very little power for weeks. Of course that is not important unless people expect to receive power at all times. Wind farms, unless they are combined with a power source that can be guaranteed to deliver power when the wind is not blowing, are not particularly useful. Eventually that fact will be generally recognized.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4945

    Feb 11, 2018 10:56 PM GMT
    Global demand for energy will probably increase by about four times by the year 2100 as poor countries strive to lift their citizens out of poverty. Also, as water shortages develop, far more energy will be required for sea water desalination. Coping with global warming will also require more energy for air conditioning. Not less than 90% of global energy will have to come from non-CO2 emitting sources to minimize global warming. Before renewables reach even 50% of our total energy, their limitations will become inescapably apparent and it will become widely accepted that renewables are not up to the task.

    Of course we can wait until renewables prove insufficient to do the job THEN take effective action. Or, we can take effective action NOW instead of waiting for the disaster which will be inevitable if we choose to depend on renewables and then find that renewables will never enable us to reduce CO2 emissions sufficiently.
  • PennsyGuy

    Posts: 1698

    Feb 13, 2018 12:34 AM GMT
    FRE0 said
    metta saidWorld's Largest Offshore Wind Farm Could Send Power to Five Countries


    https://www.ecowatch.com/offshore-wind-farm-netherlands-2523620979.html


    From the article:

    "Offshore wind farms typically use expensive underwater cables that convert the turbines' electric current into a type that electricity grids can use."

    Based on that one sentence, I would disregard the entire article. Cables, whether or not they are expensive, or whether or not they are underwater, do not convert anything. The remaining part of the sentence is also essentially meaningless. It is unmistakably clear that the author is scientifically challenged and knows nothing about the subject he is presumably writing about.

    Moreover, the wind does not blow continuously. Therefore, wind farms cannot generate continuous power. In fact, sometimes they generate very little power for weeks. Of course that is not important unless people expect to receive power at all times. Wind farms, unless they are combined with a power source that can be guaranteed to deliver power when the wind is not blowing, are not particularly useful. Eventually that fact will be generally recognized.



    You miss the point. The whole purpose of this topic is to post the headline, which is part of a campaign to lead us all to believe that we can stop using fossil fuels.
  • outdoorsmuscl...

    Posts: 2489

    Feb 13, 2018 3:21 AM GMT
    A recent study by Stanford University researchers predicted that the world could be powered entirely by renewable energy in just 20 to 40 years from now. And given that we already have the technology, it’s not that hard to imagine.

    Almost 50 countries that would be adversely affected by climate change have agreed to make their energy production 100% renewable by the year 2050 and countries all over the world are actively embracing solar, wind, and geothermal energy.
    Here we look at 12 countries in particular who are leading the way in the switch to renewable energy.


    Iceland

    Iceland generates the most clean electricity per person on earth, with almost 100% of its energy coming from renewable sources that make the most of its unique landscape. It now derives all of its energy for electricity and home heating from geothermal and hydroelectric power plants. Its renewable power plants like the geothermal plant at Blue Lagoon even draw significant amounts of tourists every year!

    Sweden
    Sweden has always had pretty good environmental credentials and in 2015, they threw down the gauntlet with an ambitious goal: eliminating fossil fuel usage within its borders. They also challenged the rest of the world to a race to become 100% renewable. They’ve increased their own investment in solar power, wind power, energy storage, smart grids, and clean transport.


    Costa Rica

    Because of its small size (just 4.9 million people) and unique geography (67 volcanoes), Costa Rica is able to meet a large part of its energy needs from hydroelectric, geothermal, solar, and wind sources. The country aims to be completely carbon-neutral by the year 2021 and has already achieved some impressive results, running on 100% renewable energy for more than two months twice in the last two years.


    Nicaragua

    Nicaragua is another Central American country where renewable energy is growing in importance. Like Costa Rica, they have a number of volcanoes, making geothermal energy production viable and thanks to government investment in wind, solar, and geothermal energy, their aim of being 90% renewables-powered by the year 2020 appears to be an achievable goal.


    United Kingdom

    The UK is a windy place and wind power is growing in importance. Using a combination of grid-connected wind farms and standalone turbines, the United Kingdom now generates more electricity from wind farms than from coal power plants. Some days, Scotland is able to produce enough wind power to supply over 100% of Scottish households. Neighbouring Ireland also continues to set new records, with enough energy to power more than 1.26 million homes being created on just one windy day in 2015.


    Germany

    For a cloudy country, Germany looks set for a bright future with solar energy. Their renewable energy output including solar has increased more than eightfold since 1990. In 2015, they set a record for meeting up to 78% of the country’s electricity demand with renewables on one highly productive day.


    Uruguay

    Uruguay is a shining example of how to do it right. Thanks to a supportive regulatory environment and a strong partnership between the public and private sector, the country has invested heavily in wind and solar power, without using subsidies or increasing consumer costs. And as a result, it now boasts a national energy supply that’s 95% renewables-powered, achieved in less than 10 years.


    Denmark

    Denmark aims to be 100% fossil-fuel-free by 2050 and it plans to use wind power to achieve that goal. They already set a world record in 2014, producing almost 40% of their overall electricity needs from wind power and the latest figures put them firmly on track to meet their first goal of obtaining 50% of their electricity from renewables by the year 2020.


    China

    They may be the world’s largest polluter, but China is also the world’s biggest investor in renewable energy, with huge investment levels both at home and overseas. China now owns: five of the world’s six largest solar-module manufacturing firms; the largest wind-turbine manufacturer; the world’s largest lithium ion manufacturer; and the world’s largest electricity utility. China is fully committed to reducing fossil fuel consumption and with its heavily polluted cities has every incentive for doing so.


    Morocco

    Morocco is a country with an abundance of sunshine (up to 350 days a year), so it has wisely decided to invest heavily in solar powered energy production. The first phase of the world’s biggest concentrated solar plant recently opened in Morocco and in combination with their wind and hydro production facilities, is predicted to produce enough energy for more than one million Moroccan households by 2018.


    USA

    The United States of America has one of the world’s largest installed solar PV capacities and an installed wind energy capacity second only to China. But it is also one of the world’s biggest energy consumers, which tends to cancel out much of its renewable capacity. Nevertheless, if more attention was paid to renewables over fossil fuels, it has been estimated that the U.S. could reduce its emissions by almost 80% in only 15 years, without impacting on consumer electricity costs.


    Kenya

    In the past, Kenya has been forced to import electricity from neighbouring countries, but they are working hard to reverse this by investing heavily in geothermal energy production, which accounted for more than half their energy mix in 2015. They also have Africa’s largest wind farm, providing another 20% of their installed electricity generating capacity.


    https://www.clickenergy.com.au/news-blog/12-countries-leading-the-way-in-renewable-energy/


    FRE0 saidGlobal demand for energy will probably increase by about four times by the year 2100 as poor countries strive to lift their citizens out of poverty. Also, as water shortages develop, far more energy will be required for sea water desalination. Coping with global warming will also require more energy for air conditioning. Not less than 90% of global energy will have to come from non-CO2 emitting sources to minimize global warming. Before renewables reach even 50% of our total energy, their limitations will become inescapably apparent and it will become widely accepted that renewables are not up to the task.

    Of course we can wait until renewables prove insufficient to do the job THEN take effective action. Or, we can take effective action NOW instead of waiting for the disaster which will be inevitable if we choose to depend on renewables and then find that renewables will never enable us to reduce CO2 emissions sufficiently.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 13, 2018 8:35 PM GMT
    It’s not common knowledge, but fossil fuels have other uses besides the production of electricity.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4945

    Feb 17, 2018 1:02 AM GMT
    The post relating to Stanford University researchers needs some comments. Note that although some of the countries listed get much of their power from nuclear reactors, the Stanford report never even mentions nuclear. That would seem to indicate a bias against nuclear power. Also, those countries which get a high percentage of power from renewables are able to do so only because they have a large amount of hydro power available which most countries do not have.

    Iceland

    Iceland gets about 26% of its electricity from geothermal plants. The cost of doing so is astronomical because of the huge number of deep wells required and because the low temperature of the steam results in low efficiency for the steam turbines. However, Iceland does get the vast majority of heat for heating buildings and providing hot water from geothermal sources. Iceland gets about 75% of its power from hydroelectric systems. Few countries have sufficient hydro capacity to do that.

    https://nea.is/hydro-power/electric-power/hydro-power-plants/

    Sweden

    Sweden gets about 53% of its power from hydro sources and 40% from nuclear sources. Again, the Stanford report never mentions nuclear power.

    Costa Rica

    Costa Rica is one of several countries which are fortunate to have considerable hydro sources. That has enabled it to get about 78% of its electricity from hydroelectric sources. It is able to get most of the remaining 22% from other renewable sources.

    Nicaragua

    Nicaragua gets about 60% of its power from fuel oil. It is a very poor country and many people do not have electricity.

    UK

    The easiest available complete figures seem to be from 1990. In that year, it got 40% of its power from gas, 20% from nuclear, and 10% from wind. The percentage from nuclear and fossil fuels has dropped as the percentage from wind has increased, but it still gets considerable power from nuclear which is ignored by the Stanford report which ignores nuclear power.

    It is interesting that the UK uses gas cooled nuclear reactors.

    Germany

    As Germany has phased out nuclear power, it has made up most of the loss by importing power from other countries and by building more coal burning power plants. The result is that it’s CO2 emissions have greatly increased. From the Stanford report:

    “In 2015, they set a record for meeting up to 78% of the country’s electricity demand with renewables on one highly productive day."

    It would be more useful to know what percentage of its electricity was generated by renewables over a period of one year rather than during one unusual day, but the Stanford report does not provide that information.

    Uruguay

    Uruguay, according to the Stanford report, gets 95% of its power from renewable sources. Like all countries which get most of their power from renewable sources, it gets most of its power from hydroelectric systems. It is highly unusual for any country to get such a large percentage of its power from renewable sources unless it is fortunate to have large amounts of hydropower available, which most countries do not have.

    Denmark

    For considerable detail of and history of power sources in Denmark, check the following link:
    http://www.world-nuclear.org/information-library/country-profiles/countries-a-f/denmark.aspx

    China

    China has 38 nuclear reactors in operation and about 20 more being constructed. China is also doing R & D on new nuclear reactor designs to eliminate some of the problems associated with nuclear power. Considering China’s huge commitment to nuclear power, it seems truly strange that the Stanford report complete ignores it. Although nuclear currently generates only a small percentage of China’s power, it is expanding at a rapid rate.

    Morocco

    Morocco gets about 20% of its power from hydroelectric sources. Also, its geography makes pumped storage readily available. Therefore, it is possible that it could get most of its power from renewable sources since the available pumped storage could help to overcome the problems resulting from the intermittent nature of renewable power systems.

    USA

    Because of the very limited availability of hydro power and limited possible pumped storage capacity, there are limits to the amount of renewable power which could be used. Reliable power is needed at all times and not just when the wind is blowing or the sun is shining. It is possible that new technologies, especially battery technologies, could be developed to make adequate storage possible and practical, but it would make more sense not to depend on technologies which do not yet exist. Therefore, the limitations of renewables will become inescapably obvious if renewables reach a high percentage of total power generating capacity. The Stanford report does not state how that problem could be overcome; rather, it chooses to ignore it. Currently the only solution to phasing out fossil fuels by almost 100% is to expand nuclear power systems so that most electricity will be generated by nuclear reactors.

    Kenya

    In 2015, Kenya got 38% of its power from hydro systems and 33% from fossil fuels, much of it being oil. It may be able to get much of its power from geothermal sources and already gets more than 20% of its power from geothermal sources. It has plans to build a nuclear plant.

    Summary

    By the year 2100, the world will have to get at least 90% of its power from non-CO2 emitting sources even though global demand for power will increase by perhaps three to four times. Merely making a substantial reduction in CO2 emissions is not enough. The Stanford report does not explain in detail how the world can get 90% of its power without nuclear power. Instead, it ignores the problem of the intermittent nature of wind and solar power and ignores nuclear power. It's objectivity must be questioned.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 17, 2018 1:36 AM GMT
    21122556BE said
    It’s not common knowledge, but fossil fuels have other uses besides the production of electricity.

    This is true. Plastics are just one product that can be created. But it's the burning of fossil fuels to produce energy that's at issue here, with the air and other pollution it produces. Stop burning petrochemicals and coal and there'd be a great enough supply of them to more cleanly manufacture synthetic materials and lubricants for centuries.