Sugar

  • beachcomber96

    Posts: 781

    Feb 03, 2018 11:29 AM GMT
    Most of us have been taught that the amount of energy input, must equal that of the output to maintain balance.
    I've used this argument to convince myself to take another bar of that ice cream and that I would just jog it off later.
    I've recently watched a great documentary named That Sugar Film by Damon Gameau, and I'm disillusioned. Its quite
    a terrifying that even with an active lifestyle, it might not be enough to "burn off" the sugar that is pumped into modern foods.
    This is processed, manufactured sugar I'm referring to and the majority of what the movie refers to just to be clear.

    So I'm curious as to what your guys' thoughts and opinions about this and especially those who maintain an active lifestyle. Is it even
    a concern?
  • mybud

    Posts: 14081

    Feb 03, 2018 2:26 PM GMT
    It's all about calories consumed and calories burned off...I eat whatever I want and view food as nutrition...
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    Feb 03, 2018 8:40 PM GMT
    The thing about movies, and the same with youtube videos, is they make it very easy to make a compelling and believable argument when there may be a lot of omissions and fallacies. To get closer to the truth you have to do your homework and read a lot, and not stuff by random people with an opinion. That being said, I agree that the amount of white sugar in your diet isn't something you should ignore, even though I agree with mybud. There's a good book about the glycemic index diet written by 4 or so doctors and nutritionists from Australia or New Zealand; well worth reading.
  • transient

    Posts: 447

    Feb 03, 2018 11:00 PM GMT
    The less refined the sugar, the less bad effects on the body......honey, molasses are full of nutrients and minerals.

    White refined sugar leaches those same minerals and nutrients out of your system in order for them to process them.


    The more homemade food you consume, its easy to control the amount and type of sugar you consume.

    Make the icecream yourself, use unrefined demorara or raw cane sugar. Go fir a run while its chilling, and eat it guilt free.
  • MuchoMasQueMu...

    Posts: 1478

    Feb 03, 2018 11:33 PM GMT
    One thing I do not like about myself is that I have a sweet tooth. I can get of control if I'm not good about making my meals regularly. What I mean by that is, as long as I eat nutritiously and take the time to prepare my meals I typically won't resort to eating sugary foods. But sometimes I get carried away with work and projects so picking up something processed is all too easy, quick and convenient. It has a lot to do with time and planning.

    Refined foods are shit. It's not only about calories in and energy output. Foods we eat can affect our hormones, blood sugar levels, our digestion. Anyone who denies this doesn't understand the biology behind nutrition. Or they're in denial. A diet adequately fortified with fiber, unprocessed wholesome foods, sufficient proteins, healthy fats and slow burning complex carbohydrates is going to be a lot better for someone than eating processed crap typically found wrapped in cellophane that has no expiration date.

    I try to use stevia to sweeten foods when I can. I have a Vitamix that I can use to make sweet tasting smoothies using healthy ingredients. There are even ways to make coffee flavored frappes by using milk, a few vegetables, cocoa powder, several whole coffee beans and even tossing in a little carrot and broccoli or some green cabbage (which you can't even taste) and sweeten it all with honey and stevia.

    My joints can get to hurting when I have processed white sugar. It actually inflames my body to the point that my hands go slightly numb. I think what happens is that the inflammation affects my carpal tunnel syndrome by inflaming my tissues which puts pressure on my radial and sometimes ulnar nerves (nerves that innervate through the wrist). It's a personal observation I have noticed that bothers me when I have too much processed sugar.

    Some people are affected more than others. Why that is the case I have no idea. But I have to listen to my body and give it want it wants and needs to feel its best.
  • beachcomber96

    Posts: 781

    Feb 05, 2018 5:15 AM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal saidThe thing about movies, and the same with youtube videos, is they make it very easy to make a compelling and believable argument when there may be a lot of omissions and fallacies. To get closer to the truth you have to do your homework and read a lot, and not stuff by random people with an opinion. That being said, I agree that the amount of white sugar in your diet isn't something you should ignore, even though I agree with mybud. There's a good book about the glycemic index diet written by 4 or so doctors and nutritionists from Australia or New Zealand; well worth reading.


    This movie was done more so in journalistic manner rather than showing a clear bias towards one or the other. So Basically what happens is Damon Gameau is filmed in a test that spanned for 60 days of which he embarks on a high-sugar diet by consuming 40 teaspoons of sugar a day hidden in perceived 'healthy' foods. So I would argue that they dont really emphasize on opinion but rather facts thats confirmed by most if not all health agencies, scientists, even the ones who are affiliated with the food giants. Its a very convincing, very powerful expose and I'd definitely recommend watching it. icon_smile.gif
  • barefootlover

    Posts: 566

    Feb 05, 2018 8:15 PM GMT
    The high fructose corn syrup is the worst and all your popular soda brands has this in it and a lot of our foods are all sweetened with it. Our foods today are causing a lot of sick people, but that's what keeps medical staff and facilities in business. I avoid products sweetened with high fructose corn syrup and rarely, if ever drink soda.
  • beachcomber96

    Posts: 781

    Feb 06, 2018 1:05 AM GMT
    barefootlover saidThe high fructose corn syrup is the worst and all your popular soda brands has this in it and a lot of our foods are all sweetened with it. Our foods today are causing a lot of sick people, but that's what keeps medical staff and facilities in business. I avoid products sweetened with high fructose corn syrup and rarely, if ever drink soda.


    Thats so true, sugar is so ingrained in our food culture that it's difficult to steer clear from it.
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    Feb 06, 2018 4:24 AM GMT
    transient saidThe less refined the sugar, the less bad effects on the body......honey, molasses are full of nutrients and minerals.

    White refined sugar leaches those same minerals and nutrients out of your system in order for them to process them.


    The more homemade food you consume, its easy to control the amount and type of sugar you consume.

    Make the icecream yourself, use unrefined demorara or raw cane sugar. Go fir a run while its chilling, and eat it guilt free.


    Sorry, but you are incorrect in thinking (if you do) that honey, molasses, or demorara sugar are much "less bad" for you than refined white sugar. The sweetening ingredient in all of them is the same - fructose. It is fructose which is harmful to the body in any quantity. White table sugar is sucrose, which contains equal parts fructose and glucose. Although honey and molasses do contain some additional nutrients, the sugars in both honey and molasses are also essentially 1/2 fructose and 1/2 glucose(dextrose).
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    Feb 06, 2018 5:00 AM GMT
    One of the problems when you eat processed crap like ice cream bars, if you otherwise follow a careful diet, is that processed foods are high in sugar and salt, and make you retain a lot of water. Water is heavy and causes a large short-term weight gain, but it's often the food that takes the blame. This complicates "weight loss", because to get rid of the "weight gain" from an ice cream bar, if that's what you're feeling bad about, the process is actually two-fold: 1) Burning off the excess calories from the food; and 2) Shedding the excess water you're retaining and the associated weight, which is FAR in excess of the weight, IF ANY, that you might have gained from the food itself. One reason low-carbohydrate diets cause a large weight-loss in the first week is the loss of water weight related to carbohydrate intakes.

    Try an experiment sometime. Eat really clean for a week, and drink lots of water, and on Saturday morning, record your weight. On Saturday night, go out and eat 2 or 3 slices of pizza, and down a couple of beers. Weight yourself again on Sunday and Monday morning. The weight gain will be far, FAR in excess of what you could possibly have gained from the caloric value of the food. Note also the swollen look in your face and fingers. It's not hard to show a weight gain of 3-4 pounds from an exercise like this, which represents your body retaining a mere 1/2-gallon of extra water. In order to gain that amount of weight from food, you would have to eat about 14,000 more calories that day than you burned, which is basically impossible.

    Don't make this more complicated than it is...