Climate 101: Ozone Depletion | National Geographic

  • beachcomber96

    Posts: 1122

    Feb 22, 2018 4:20 AM GMT


    Published on Feb 12, 2018
    Far above Earth's surface, the ozone layer helps to protect life from harmful ultraviolet radiation. Learn what CFCs are, how they have contributed to the ozone hole, and how the 1989 Montreal Protocol sought to put an end to ozone depletion.

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  • bro4bro

    Posts: 2193

    Feb 22, 2018 5:45 PM GMT
    I'm unclear on why this video is called "Climate 101". The ozone layer has absolutely nothing to do with the earth's climate. Seems like they're just using a currently popular buzzword to attract attention. I guess "Atmospheric Science 101" wasn't sexy enough for them.

    I'm also disappointed that their computer generated graphics of the "hole" in the ozone layer quit at 1994. Did they not want to show things are getting better? Are they only interested in selling doom and gloom?

    There was a time, about 20 years ago, when the hole in the ozone layer was routinely blamed (especially by Australians, since they're closer to the problem) for everything bad that happened, from skin cancer to droughts. Then global warming became the new cause celebre and the ozone layer was yesterday's news. What's next, I wonder?
  • beachcomber96

    Posts: 1122

    Feb 22, 2018 6:48 PM GMT
    bro4bro saidI'm unclear on why this video is called "Climate 101". The ozone layer has absolutely nothing to do with the earth's climate. Seems like they're just using a currently popular buzzword to attract attention. I guess "Atmospheric Science 101" wasn't sexy enough for them.

    I'm also disappointed that their computer generated graphics of the "hole" in the ozone layer quit at 1994. Did they not want to show things are getting better? Are they only interested in selling doom and gloom?

    There was a time, about 20 years ago, when the hole in the ozone layer was routinely blamed (especially by Australians, since they're closer to the problem) for everything bad that happened, from skin cancer to droughts. Then global warming became the new cause celebre and the ozone layer was yesterday's news. What's next, I wonder?


    The ozone layer and climate go completely hand in hand.

    Then write a strongly worded letter to National Geographic and complain to them.