Beachwood 4-5789

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    Feb 26, 2009 5:47 AM GMT
    I heard this song today and it remind me of my old exchange: CLearwater

    Can anyone remember his?
  • Csrobbie2000

    Posts: 359

    Feb 26, 2009 3:51 PM GMT
    I love that song! Karen Carpenters is definately one of my favorite singer.
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    Feb 26, 2009 4:28 PM GMT
    *The number you are calling 234-5789 has been changed. The new number is 867-5309*
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    Feb 26, 2009 4:38 PM GMT
    Csrobbie2000 saidI love that song! Karen Carpenters is definately one of my favorite singer.

    Karen Carpenter??? ... icon_eek.gif ... I was listening to The Marvelettes. .. icon_lol.gif

    "The Marvelettes were an American singing girl group on the Tamla label. Motown's first successful female vocal group, the Marvelettes are most notable for recording the companies first US #1 pop hit, "Please Mr. Postman", and for setting the precedent for later Motown girl groups such as Martha and the Vandellas and The Supremes. ...

    Their second album featured songs from many accomplished writers -- for example, Brian Holland, Marvin Gaye, Smokey Robinson and Lamont Dozier. The hit album featured the hit singles "Playboy" (#4 R&B / #7 Pop), a catchy pop song, "Beechwood 4-5789" (#7 R&B / #17 Pop) (which became the most popular telephone number in America before Tommy Tutone's 1982 pop hit "867-5309"), and the rhythmic ballad "Someday, Someway" (#8 R&B)."

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Marvelettes
  • Csrobbie2000

    Posts: 359

    Feb 27, 2009 4:06 AM GMT
    Ooh, I didn't know about the other version until now. From my understanding, in the 60s, the phone system used to be divided into areas called "exchanges." Way back before dial phones, to make a call you reached the operator, gave her the number and she would plug you into the proper exchange, tell the other operator what the number was, and that other operator would plug you into the appropriate line. Thus, "Beechwood 4-5789" meant the Beechwood Exchange, Rack 4, Line 5789" and became "234-5789" if you had a dial phone.
    By the 1940s, nearly all local calls were dialed directly in most phone systems, but until the 1960s, phone numbers were still assigned with the exchange name for the convenience of operators who still handled a lot of calls.
    This practice died out as the Electronic Switching System came along, and a number might be miles away from the former exchange.
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    Feb 27, 2009 4:19 AM GMT
    "You can call me up and have a date, any ol' time." icon_smile.gif
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    Feb 27, 2009 11:26 AM GMT
    Csrobbie2000 saidWay back before dial phones, to make a call you reached the operator, gave her the number and she would plug you into the proper exchange, tell the other operator what the number was, and that other operator would plug you into the appropriate line.

    When I was a kid, the operator used to scare me when she said "number please." I was afraid if I said it wrong she would yell at me.