Quit smoking permanently

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 26, 2009 11:53 AM GMT
    My dad is addicted to smoking since last 20 years, earlier it didn’t had much effect but now when he is 50+ his cough level has considerably increased. He is also willing to quit smoking, but he always ended up smoking again. Can anyone help me find a proper guide or procedure to quit smoking permanently? Thanks in advance
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 26, 2009 1:30 PM GMT
    MaryPilling saidHe is also willing to quit smoking, but he always ended up smoking again.


    If he always ended up smoking again, then he never really was willing to quit. Until he really is willing to quit, he won't quit.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 26, 2009 3:30 PM GMT

    Kudos to your dad for being willing to try to tackle what is said to be the toughest physical and psychological addiction out there. And kudos to you for supporting him through this.

    I have friends who say good things about Zyban (Wellbutrin) and Chantrix, though there seem to be some recent safety concerns around Chantrix. In either case your dad would need to see a doctor to figure out if either of those might be a good option.

    Every once in a while my work as an animal trainer comes in handy for human behavior. Breaking addictions is one of them. The theory is that people with addictions like smoking receive all kinds of cues from their environment that encourage them to smoke. The general solution is two fold: alter the appearance of their environment as much as possible and change their routines.

    A few examples:

    1) Repaint and rearrange the furniture in rooms of the house where your dad smokes or where he tends to spend time right before smoking.

    2) If he smokes in his car, swap cars for a few weeks.

    3) Replace clothes that smell of smoke.

    4) Alter routines. e.g. if your dad usually has breakfast at home with cigarettes before or after, go out to breakfast for a couple of weeks. scramble other routines around his smoking in similar ways.

    5) Fill the time that would usually be taken by smoking with something else: chewing gum, reading the newspaper, walking, having sex, washing the car, etc.

    Some people find that going on a vacation is a good way to kick off a break from nicotine addiction (e.g. David Sedaris who went to Japan to kick his habit and wrote "When You Are on Fire" about the trip. It's still important to alter the environment and routines you return to or relapse is likely.

    Finally remember that lapses may happen and hey don't necessarily mean a relapse.

    Best of luck to you and your dad.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 26, 2009 3:42 PM GMT
    he mate
    well i was a heavy smoker for years.. and had tried everything to help me quit,
    nothing seemed to work.

    Until... chantix. this drug stopped me smoking, look into it, and good luck.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 26, 2009 4:04 PM GMT
    I think it is somewhat dependent on the person. I quit cold turkey. At the time I heard that nicotine addiction really only last for two weeks. In retrospect I don't see how that can be in anyway accurate, but at the time I had a clearly defined goal of going 14 days without smoking. I figured as sucky as it was I would power through it and did. I was also pretty unbearable to be around for for the first week. That was 14 years ago and I haven't looked back since. In the end it came down to pride. I wasn't going to have a chemical dictate my actions.

    Just and update: I looked it up and it looks like nicotine withdraw symptoms only last for a week. So the 14 day thing was incorrect in that it was to long. Clearly I suffered longer than I needed to.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 26, 2009 4:10 PM GMT
    There are lots of tricks and procedures to help quit smoking and I'm sure a good portion of them work. I think its a matter of finding what works for your lifestyle.

    My dad was similar to yours. He turned 50 and about 2 months later quit smoking COLD TURKEY after smoking for 35 years! We all had been on his ass about it. We wanted him to quit and be healthier. Even thought he never gave a good reason beside the fact that he wanted to, I believe it was because of his grandson. Christopher is his first grandchild, born in January and by June had quit. I think he wants to see him grow up!

    More than anything it has to be about support. Positive reinforcement has a great affect on the mind.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 26, 2009 4:27 PM GMT
    paradox said
    MaryPilling saidHe is also willing to quit smoking, but he always ended up smoking again.


    If he always ended up smoking again, then he never really was willing to quit. Until he really is willing to quit, he won't quit.


    true, true, true paadox. and remember, dad only has to stop smoking ONE cigarette-the next one. as a temporarty quitter myself for 9 years (i will not have quit totally until i am dead) this is one of the many thought processes i use.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 26, 2009 6:12 PM GMT
    MaryPilling saidMy dad is addicted to smoking since last 20 years, earlier it didn’t had much effect but now when he is 50+ his cough level has considerably increased. He is also willing to quit smoking, but he always ended up smoking again. Can anyone help me find a proper guide or procedure to quit smoking permanently? Thanks in advance


    Understand, the cigarettes HAVE had an effect. It's just that now it's to the point it can no longer be ignored, denied, nor rationalized.

    Find a drawer. Place the cigarettes in the drawer.

    Stop smoking.

    It's that simple.

    One can make all the excuses they want but, whether it's tobacco, drinking, being fat, being skinny, or any other non-healthy behavior, the person affected needs to take action and have the desire to be successful. The person with the bad behavior has to make a choice to behave in a non-destructive manner and stick to it.

    Sure, the first few days of behavior change can be a drag, and even the first few months can sometimes tug on a person, but, it's as simple as saying I will no longer self-destruct in this way.

    Those I've known that are successful made a commitment to change, and then did it...no bullshit; no excuses.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 26, 2009 6:51 PM GMT
    A class action lawsuit is being filled against Chantix. The side effects are very bad, including extreme nightmeirs. My friend quit smoking with Chantix and had this to say "well i quit smoking with Chantix, but i only tried to kill myself twice" I talked to a few other people who quit smoking on it, and pretty much said the same thing
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 26, 2009 9:17 PM GMT
    Hickeris saidA class action lawsuit is being filled against Chantix. The side effects are very bad, including extreme nightmeirs. My friend quit smoking with Chantix and had this to say "well i quit smoking with Chantix, but i only tried to kill myself twice" I talked to a few other people who quit smoking on it, and pretty much said the same thing


    i read this too.. and i agree its not great for everyone.. but it worked for me with no side effects at all... also 2 close friends of mine took it and the same for them.. no side effects... i guess it just depends the individual
  • jlly_rnchr

    Posts: 1759

    Feb 27, 2009 4:43 AM GMT
    tightandtonedjock said
    paradox said
    MaryPilling saidHe is also willing to quit smoking, but he always ended up smoking again.


    If he always ended up smoking again, then he never really was willing to quit. Until he really is willing to quit, he won't quit.


    true, true, true paadox. and remember, dad only has to stop smoking ONE cigarette-the next one. as a temporarty quitter myself for 9 years (i will not have quit totally until i am dead) this is one of the many thought processes i use.


    I like that! A temporary quitter...I'm one of those too.

    Anyway, a couple things. Is everyone replying in this thread an ex-smoker or current smoker? Because, at least to me personally, it was not "that simple" to quit last year. It was hard to do, so cut smokers some slack. Unless of course you're an ex-smoker, then I'll just shut up and let you talk.

    Now, on to tricks. Well, as I said, I'm not the perfect success story, but I used Nicorette gum for about a month, and it worked really well. I followed that up with regular gum and jolly ranchers. Something in the mouth always helps. I also joined my gym at the same time, which I think helped motivate me not to smoke since I was going to be doing cardio three times a week. And I paid my membership in full so that I had committed a chunk of cigarette money to something other than cigarettes. These little rationalizations helped, kinda tricked me into thinking it just wasn't an option to smoke. Then Thanksgiving and Christmas got me all stressed and I caved.

    Um, are those prescription pills covered by most medical insurance? They could be pricey if not (no idea, just saying). Also, anecdotally, I have a friend who goes out for cigarettes with me quite often, and he's been on Chantix for over a month.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 27, 2009 5:02 AM GMT
    I quit smoking cold turkey twice and each time I ended up in the hospital with bleeding lungs. Nicotine affects each person differently. My grandmothers smoked for 50 years and one day just said no more and never had a craving. My grandfather, on the other had, had developed stomach cancer and the docs told him that smoking was helping him so he continued. I did not go the route of Chantix. Friends said it worked, but came off it because of the dreams and depression associated with it.

    The patched work for me. I had done them before, but they were too expensive. It was cheaper to smoke than to quit in my situation. Now that cigs are almost as expensive is the patches, it makes monetary sense to quit. One thing I will caution: Not all remedies will work for everyone. The patches are even a bit difficult to navigate. I opted to do the generic patches one week and it was a mistake. Example, the Walmart brand Equate is exactly like Nicoderm but nearly half the cost. Walgreens is about $10 more than Walmart, but are round and dont stick very well, which means you are not getting the complete benefit of the patch which will cause a rise in cravings. I found this out through trial and error because the generic brands do not show a pic of the patch. THey also will leave redness after wearing and if you smoke will on the patch, it has been known to cause overdosage of nicotine and in some cases, cardiac arrest. I would suggest have your father's blood tested by doc to find out what level nicotine is present and get recommendations about what might best work from there. Also, keep in mind that the majority of people who quit smoking replace that habit with another habit. I am replacing my cig habit with working out. Best of luck to your dad.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 01, 2009 2:25 PM GMT
    "Anyway, a couple things. Is everyone replying in this thread an ex-smoker or current smoker? Because, at least to me personally, it was not "that simple" to quit last year. It was hard to do, so cut smokers some slack. Unless of course you're an ex-smoker, then I'll just shut up and let you talk."


    I quit smoking 12.5 years ago. I'd been smoking Marlboro reds, and I switched to a natural, additive-free brand for a few weeks before quitting cold turkey. The first day and a half was the worst; after that, the cravings tapered off.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 02, 2009 5:29 PM GMT
    I'm on day four today. It's getting better
  • JohnG16775

    Posts: 235

    Mar 09, 2009 9:51 PM GMT
    I had to take my father to MD Anderson every day for 6 weeks for radiationa nd chemotherapy, that did it for me.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 10, 2009 5:31 PM GMT
    If he is needing a mental booster for becoming smoke free, I suggest Alan Carr's "The Easyway to Stop Smoking". It has been several months now for me. It doesnt approach the issue of smoking from a typical point of view. He deconstructs all the myths we have about becoming a non-smoker and about smoking. His methods are unusual but I read the book and became a non-smoker. I became a non-smoker without having to add rewards, substitutes, go on meds ,etc. Other well known people have tried his process as well like Ashton Kutcher, Ellen Degeneres, Anthony Hopkins ( I think), and Richard Branson ( I think and he is the CEO of Virgin Air)

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 22, 2009 6:38 PM GMT
    Chantix gave me some of the worst abdominal problems of my life - for weeks, and horrible nightmares, and nightsweats...
    On the plus side - it did make cigarettes taste horrid.

    The patch gave me really vivid dreams and nightmares - I'd end up sweating it off because they were so bad.

    The gum gave me bad jaw problems - turns out nicorette doesn't go so well in a person with TMJ and an oral fixation.

    Toothpicks and suckers are helpful for the oral fixation bit. Scrambling routines helps if you can do it.

    Going to try Wellbutrin next.

    If that doesn't work I'm going to try taking 2 weeks off, and just getting baked the whole time. I'm guessing the irritability isn't so bad when you're high.

    The withdrawals are miserable - probably the way you can help him the most through it is to keep him active and realize that he'll be a total ass hole to you while he's going through it and don't get your feelings hurt - he doesn't mean his horrible attitude. That's what I'd want anyway.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 04, 2009 1:48 PM GMT
    Try snus, and by that I mean the REAL snus from Sweden, not this BS from Marlboro and Camel. Many who switched to snus ended up quitting cigs without intending to. You still get the nic hit, without the health hazards of smoking. 99% of the risk of cigarettes comes from the smoking of tobacco, not the nicotine itself. (Indeed, nicotine does not cause cancer.) Swedish snus is regulated as a food by the Swedish government, so must meet stricter standards than US tobacco. The pasteurization of snus kills the TSNAs (tobacco specific nitrosamines) in the tobacco. It is the TSNAs that cause cancer. There is a reason the Swedes have the lowest rates of cancer of any nation in the world and that reason is because snus, not smoking, is the preferred method of tobacco delivery in Sweden.

    Snus is moist snuff, packaged in small individual teabag-like doses. You pop a 'portion' in your upper lip and leave it there for 1-3 hours. There is no spitting involved. It is no different than popping a breath mint in your mouth. It removes an individual's tobacco usage from the public to the private, where it always should have been. This means you can use snus in any and every nonsmoking area and no one will be the wiser.

    You can order it direct from Sweden without paying an importation tax, provided the order is under $200. Purchase from either The Northerner or Buysnus.com. There are US sites that sell it, such as getsnus.com and premiumsnus.com, but the selection is nowhere near as complete as in Sweden. The only snus you can't purchase from Sweden is either Romeo y Julieta or Monte Christo, because both of those contain Cuban tobaccos. For further information from other snussers, check the Snuson forums.

    Snus is available in an assortment of flavors. Bergamot (think Earl Grey tea) is the traditional flavoring, but mint, Violet, Pomegranate, Vanilla Mint, Licorice/Anis and juniper are also available. (Those who like gin martinis should sample Gotesborg Rape, affectionately known as 'goat rape.') As far as cost, I recently received an order of 21 cans which averaged out to $3.43 per can. It takes me 5 days to get through one can.There's no way one could smoke for 5 days on such a small amount of money.

    (Snus also comes in a loose form, which is more for your money - 45-50 grams instead of 24 grams in a can of portions or 10 grams in can of mini-portions. There's a trick to working the loose such that a mudslide does not occur. I can work the loose, for upwards of an hour now without a mudslide, but that's mainly in preparation for growing and making my own, which will occur after the 2010 growing season.)

    http://www.northerner.com/

    http://www.buysnus.com/

    http://www.getsnus.com/

    http://www.premiumsnus.com/

    http://www.snuson.com/

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snus

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 07, 2009 2:03 PM GMT
    my father‘s also a heavy smoker,but last month my mum told me in the phone that he has quitted smoking,it's amazing
    i think quit that habit ’s a taugh work,it‘s better to find some medical cases for him
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 05, 2010 7:59 PM GMT
    Hickeris saidA class action lawsuit is being filled against Chantix. The side effects are very bad, including extreme nightmeirs. My friend quit smoking with Chantix and had this to say "well i quit smoking with Chantix, but i only tried to kill myself twice" I talked to a few other people who quit smoking on it, and pretty much said the same thing


    Somebody I knew shot themselves in the head in a parking lot after taking it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 05, 2010 8:00 PM GMT
    MaryPilling saidMy dad is addicted to smoking since last 20 years, earlier it didn’t had much effect but now when he is 50+ his cough level has considerably increased. He is also willing to quit smoking, but he always ended up smoking again. Can anyone help me find a proper guide or procedure to quit smoking permanently? Thanks in advance


    Why, you have one life to live. If he enjoys smoking leave the man alone.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 07, 2010 6:31 PM GMT
    That whole notion is silly. It's like saying, "She enjoys her crack..." Same difference, different chemical.

    How some folks can be short sighted amazes me.

    Sometimes, when folks won't help themselves, intervention is required. If someone can't breathe, that's might mean it's time for intervention.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 07, 2010 7:09 PM GMT
    I was a lifelong smoker (since 15) and quit about 2 years ago this coming May. Over the past few years I had quit a few times and restarted, this time never again. I always knew I would quit permanently and not because I was in the grave either LOL
    Sometimes it really does take a few attempts so long as you don't give up try again.
    I waited till I had a bit of a nasty cold and didn't want to smoke,, then I went out and bought a pack of cigs I can't stand,,Winston in my case. I smoked about 5 of them while I was feeling like shit. Put the pack up on top of the fridge and they are still there almost 2 years later slowly turning to dust and covered in dust. A reminder.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 07, 2010 7:14 PM GMT
    Yep. I put my chew can in my upper left drawer, so..that if I ever became weak, I didn't have to go to the store...It sat there for 3 years before I threw it out. I never "slipped." I didn't use any bogus assistant aids. I quit, and that was that.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 01, 2010 8:22 PM GMT
    Old topic, but I didn't want to get barked at for creating a duplicate thread by the forum nazis...

    After 15 years of smoking cigarettes, I was finally able to quit a couple weeks ago. I have to say that it has not been easy, but it hasn't been tough in the ways that I thought it would. Just wanted to give a shout out to anybody who's trying to quit and not having much luck. My advice:

    Do:
    1) plan for it -- pick up snacks and keep them at your home, work, and in car. For me, driving (especially getting stuck in traffic) was one of my biggest triggers. I also timed it so that the hardest times would be during the weekend -- so I didn't have to deal with coworkers or other possible irritations.
    2) avoid triggers if possible -- I had to walk away from my boss, yelling at me, 3 days after I quit smoking. I walked around a few minutes, calmed down, and came back. I told him I could get another job, but couldn't get new lungs. He understood. I also avoided beer for a week or two before trying it again.
    3) be absolutely certain that you want to quit -- this is so important that I can't emphasize it enough. if I gave myself an excuse to fail, I would still be a smoker.
    4) replace your smoke breaks with other legitimate breaks if you need to, but just don't smoke. Walk around, do some push ups -- whatever it takes. Just don't smoke.
    5) think of the benefits: healthier lungs, whiter teeth, no constant clearing of throat / smoker's cough, increased energy, more restful (at same time, shorter in duration) sleep, increased blood flow (yes, your dick is noticeably bigger), increased sense of taste and smell, you don't stink all the time, save $, and on, and on...

    Don't:
    1) allow yourself a crutch by smoking one or two cigs when it gets really hard. For me personally, the first day was ok, second was bad, third was awful, fourth was bad, and from that point on it was easier than I could have imagined. The physical addiction had been broken by then. But during previous attempts, I allowed myself to "cheat" if my temper got really bad. That was the single biggest reason I had failed. One failed attempt, I bough some "black & mild" cigars, and would keep them in my glove compartment in case I got road rage. Sure enough, cigars ran out, I bought cigs. I think allowing yourself to smoke when it gets hard alleviates the symptoms at first, but draws out the addiction longer by "resetting" your need to a new starting point. So you still have to deal with withdrawal -- just a couple days later. Basically, you made it harder on yourself.

    Anyway, sorry to ramble. I'm kind of surprised how easy (at least, after the fourth day) this has been. If I had known that having a plan would get me through so easily, I would have quit ages ago.