Something new for the hills.

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    Feb 27, 2009 10:07 PM GMT
    I have had a Trek 1000 for several years now, but notice that others make the hills better than I. Would it be wise to start looking for a bike that could handle the hills better or is this a tale tale sign that I need more stamina?

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    Feb 27, 2009 10:13 PM GMT
    I'm always up for buying a new ride, but you could save a little cash by upgrading your wheelset.

    It's an "inexpensive" way to lower rotational weight.

    Doing a couple different workouts can help too.
    1 - squats - good form, moderate weight, and either high reps or VERY slow (but fewer) reps

    2 - dead lift - good form and moderate weight doing high reps.

    3 - hamstring curls - good form and moderate weight doing high reps.

    Oh and ride more hills, but try to keep your RPM above 90.
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    Feb 27, 2009 11:25 PM GMT
    wheelfast saidI'm always up for buying a new ride, but you could save a little cash by upgrading your wheelset.

    It's an "inexpensive" way to lower rotational weight.

    Doing a couple different workouts can help too.
    1 - squats - good form, moderate weight, and either high reps or VERY slow (but fewer) reps

    2 - dead lift - good form and moderate weight doing high reps.

    3 - hamstring curls - good form and moderate weight doing high reps.

    Oh and ride more hills, but try to keep your RPM above 90.

    Ok...all I have is a bowflex and it will not let do some of those movements.
    I do have some hand weights, may be something could be done there.

    Do you have any suggestions that would not involve so much equipment?
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    Mar 02, 2009 4:33 PM GMT
    LutherGooch saidI have had a Trek 1000 for several years now, but notice that others make the hills better than I. Would it be wise to start looking for a bike that could handle the hills better or is this a tale tale sign that I need more stamina?



    Your bike is just fine don't worry about that. I love new equipment just as much as the next guy, but short of a better set of wheels, your best bet is just to do more hills. You can easily pick up a set of brand new ~1500 gram clinchers for pretty cheap on ebay. Lots of guys dump the stock wheels on high end bikes, and typically these are pretty good training wheels and fairly light, most likely much better than the wheels you currently have.

    That being said, Hill repeats, try to climb in staying in your saddle, only get up to get the RPMs up. Run the biggest gear you can. Keeping your RPMs above 90 on steep is tough especially when you run with big gears, but keep it over 75-80 if you can. Repeat the hills and when you think you can't do another, do another, then another. On shallow hills run them fast and don't let up, try to find long ones. If all you can find are short steep, don't fret those work too, and give you a bit of a respite on the way down.

    Also try to ride with intensity. Not just on hill repeats but when out for a ride. You will get an infinitely better workout riding 20-30 miles trying to stay at or above LT than you would JRA all day.
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    Mar 10, 2009 3:10 AM GMT
    LutherGooch saidI have had a Trek 1000 for several years now, but notice that others make the hills better than I. Would it be wise to start looking for a bike that could handle the hills better or is this a tale tale sign that I need more stamina?

    Different bikes have different gear ratio spans, some geared lower overall, some higher, some with a wide range from low to high. If you do a lot of hills you might do better with a lower-range gearset. A competent bike shop can change your current gears, either the rear cassette, front chainring or both. If you choose a new bike, study the spec sheets for the gear ratios.

    During a charity ride to Key West I rode a Cannondale touring bike that has a very wide range of 30 gears, with several very low ratios, since this kind of bike is meant to carry heavy luggage over varied terrain. Though a mostly flat route, we had many bridges, one in particular over Card Sound being very steep. Most riders had to walk their bikes up it, even the super-light carbon frames, but I pedaled the whole way, despite not being very strong. Gears can make the difference.
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    Mar 10, 2009 3:20 AM GMT
    I wonder how much your bike weighs, with all of the gear on it...
    compare it to your peers' bikes. I gotta say, I had a Trek (much lower grade than yours, LutherGooch) years ago when I used to do sprint triathlons - and it was too heavy. I got a GREAT workout, hehe, but, y'know, it was frustrating to see people pass me.

    I liked the advice of the others, which, if in your case it's your need for greater strength, or in part, their help could aid you get up those hills faster!
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    Mar 10, 2009 4:22 PM GMT
    Bikethere,

    That was very helpful, thank you.
    I have done what you suggested and so far things are working out much better. I feel like an idiot to, because I have failed to clean my chain in a few weeks. Now that the chain is clean and oiled gearing is much better.

    Luther
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    Apr 30, 2009 1:31 PM GMT
    the best excise for the body
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    May 01, 2009 1:48 AM GMT
    Ok, I just came back from a 278.8 miles ride in Tenn, Alabama, and Georgia and my chain kept going off on those mountains? So, my group got pissed at me for failing to keep up. I would change from my third gear to the last and lose it. Of course, I would stop and get off to re-chain the bike and lose my friends.
    I just had a check up before the ride, so I have no idea why this would happen.
    But we made the mileage...so it is not a complete loss.
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    May 01, 2009 1:02 PM GMT
    Hey same thing happens to me and I have no idea why........
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    May 01, 2009 2:15 PM GMT
    LutherGooch saidOk, I just came back from a 278.8 miles ride in Tenn, Alabama, and Georgia and my chain kept going off on those mountains? So, my group got pissed at me for failing to keep up. I would change from my third gear to the last and lose it. Of course, I would stop and get off to re-chain the bike and lose my friends.
    I just had a check up before the ride, so I have no idea why this would happen.
    But we made the mileage...so it is not a complete loss.

    The shifting mechanism has adjustable screw stops that limit the maximum range of travel, when shifting either up or down. If these are set incorrectly, the chain can move too far and slip off the top or bottom gears. Is this what you're describing?

    Visit a bike shop, they can make the adjustment, it's very simple.

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    May 01, 2009 2:23 PM GMT
    aww boo i thougth this post was about the show icon_sad.gif
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    May 02, 2009 1:03 AM GMT
    Red_Vespa said
    LutherGooch saidOk, I just came back from a 278.8 miles ride in Tenn, Alabama, and Georgia and my chain kept going off on those mountains? So, my group got pissed at me for failing to keep up. I would change from my third gear to the last and lose it. Of course, I would stop and get off to re-chain the bike and lose my friends.
    I just had a check up before the ride, so I have no idea why this would happen.
    But we made the mileage...so it is not a complete loss.

    The shifting mechanism has adjustable screw stops that limit the maximum range of travel, when shifting either up or down. If these are set incorrectly, the chain can move too far and slip off the top or bottom gears. Is this what you're describing?

    Visit a bike shop, they can make the adjustment, it's very simple.

    I went to a bike shop, got nothing. I don't really know what is going on. The change over from one gear to the other is too slow, and then I lose my chain.
    Next week i have the 375 mile ride from Atlanta to Savannah...god am i screwed.
    But there are no serious hills, it is rolling hills...maybe I will be ok?