Red Wine

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    Oct 14, 2007 4:45 AM GMT
    Ok I cime from a family who believes a glass of wine a day keeps the doctor away. I've had a glass of wine with dinner almost everyday since i was 12, what are your opions on this and the health benefits of red wine?
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    Oct 14, 2007 5:00 AM GMT
    I personally enjoy a glass or two of red wine a day, though I've cut back considerably lately, as alcohol interferes with some meds I'm on. The benefits have to do with heart health and possibly preventing certain cancers, though there are a few not so healthy effects as well. Here's a couple of good articles I found that may be of interest:

    http://www.healthcastle.com/redwine-heart.shtml

    http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=23592
  • hotversguy

    Posts: 155

    Oct 14, 2007 5:30 AM GMT
    it comes from the anti-oxidant properties of something called resveratol. The highest levels of such are actually found in white wines from the Finger Lakes.

    that being said, even as someone who no longer drinks, the bigger benefit (i believe) comes from the destressing effect one glass of wine can have. stress is far more dangerous than many of us realize.
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    Oct 14, 2007 5:34 AM GMT
    very true my dad who is 47 and is pretty healthy just had a heart attack because of his high stress job and lifestyle
  • Alan95823

    Posts: 306

    Oct 14, 2007 3:47 PM GMT
    Very true, hotversguy... I have all kinds of back issues that are exacerbated by stress, and my 3oz glass of wine once or twice a week is enough to wind it down.
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    Oct 14, 2007 4:17 PM GMT
    Yes, relaxation should not be underestimated, and there may be benefits to regularly drinking moderate ammounts of alcohol in general. Anyway the following if the entry for Resveratrol from the Oxford Companion to Wine -- just for anyone's interest and it's informative:

    resveratrol

    phenolic compound produced by grapevines (and other plants such as peanut and eucalyptus trees), particularly in response to microbial attack (see phytoalexins) or artificial agents such as ultraviolet radiation. It is one of a number of compounds (including catechin and quercetin) found in wine thought to contribute to health aspects of its moderate consumption. Resveratrol is also found in other grape products such as juice and raisins. Resveratrol belongs to a class of compounds called stilbenes. In grapevines this also includes its derivatives, piceid, pterostilbene, and the viniferins. Woody parts of the vine normally contain large amounts of stilbenes, principally viniferins, which are thought to protect against wood decay. In the vineyard, leaves and berries produce resveratrol only in response to some action, such as fungal attack, where its subsequent accumulation may slow or stop the infection. There are numerous factors in the growing of grapes and vinification that can affect resveratrol concentration in the finished wine. Species, variety, clone, and rootstock influence potential stilbene production. For example, wines made from muscadinia grapes or from pinot noir tend to have high levels of resveratrol, whereas cabernet sauvignon has lower levels. Wines produced in cooler regions or areas with greater disease pressure such as Burgundy and New York often have more resveratrol, while wines from hot, dry climates such as Australia and California frequently have lower resveratrol concentrations.

    Wine-making procedures have a great effect on resveratrol concentration in the final product. Red wines have a much higher resveratrol content, usually about ten times, than that found in whites. This is not necessarily because white grapes manufacture less resveratrol, but because stilbenes are manufactured in the grape skins and maceration, integral to the production of a red wine, encourages the extraction of these compounds. yeast strain, lactic acid bacteria, use of fining agents, and handling procedures can also influence resveratrol concentration to some extent. Much of the interest in resveratrol in the 1990s and early 2000s came from its suspected connection to wine‚s health benefits. It was known to play a part in herbal remedies for many years, but it was not until 1992 that New York researchers Siemann and Creasy made the link between it, wine, and its possible contribution to the french paradox. Resveratrol has been reported to reduce serum platelet aggregation, cholesterol levels, liver lipids, and act as a cancer chemopreventative agent. As part of the phenolic milieu in wine, its moderate consumption can contribute to good health.


    G.L.C.
    References


    Goldberg, D.M., Yan, J., Ng, E., Diamandis, E.P., Karumanchiri, A., Soleas, G., and Waterhouse, A. L., ‛A global survey of trans-resveratrol concentrations in commercial wines‚, 46 (1995), 159–65.
    Siemann, E. H., and Creasy, G. L, ‛Concentration of the phytoalexin resveratrol in wine‚, , 43 (1992), 49–52.
  • hotversguy

    Posts: 155

    Oct 14, 2007 4:46 PM GMT
    of course grape juice has as much as wine, but where's the fun in that?
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    Oct 14, 2007 5:13 PM GMT
    Actually, grape juice doesn't get have as much of the polyphenols because they mostly get extracted from the skins during the fermentation process.

    But there are new compounds being discovered in - and new health claims being made about - all kinds of fruits. For example, a number of analgesic (aspirin-like) and stimulant (caffeine-like) coumpounds have been identified in cherries. So the industry is trying to promote cherry juice as a "natural" sports drink. No big sales so far. (Unfortunately, fermented cherries take on a really nasty flavor that is definitely an acquired taste. e.g. try a shot of Kirsch.) There are also some attempts to use chopped cherries as a filler for "light" hamburger. These things haven't really caught on so far, but if you would spend a few dollars to try it out, we'd all appreciate it.

    (Disclaimer, Mindgarden's family grows small commercial crops of cherries and grapes in their copious spare time.)