Is it wise to swim after lifting weights?

  • manpit209

    Posts: 213

    Mar 02, 2009 7:09 AM GMT
    When I lift weights or do resistance training, I usually spend some time on the treadmill after I'm done so I can get some cardio into my routine. I want to change things up and maybe swim after doing my weight routine. Is this a good idea? Has anyone done this? I'm mostly concerned because the body temperature is high after a good workout so jumping into a pool may shock the body and be harmful. The pool at my gym is heated but the temperature is still cooler than the body. I was thinking of doing this because I like swimming more than the treadmill but realized the potential danger. What are you thoughts on this? Thanks for any feedback!
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    Mar 02, 2009 4:16 PM GMT
    I don't see anything wrong with swimming after lifting. Think about jumping into a cold plunge right out of the steam room.........good for us! I sometime run after weights - but I swim 1000 yards on alt. days from my weights. That way - almost every day (or night, in my case) I'm doing something good for my body. The cold plunge - is a great, exhilarating thing to try, for those who haven't, by the way!
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    Mar 02, 2009 4:55 PM GMT
    My understanding is that swimming after lifting can speed up muscle recovery, but I have no source to cite on that one.
  • MichVBPlayer2...

    Posts: 132

    Mar 02, 2009 5:00 PM GMT
    manpit209 saidWhen I lift weights or do resistance training, I usually spend some time on the treadmill after I'm done so I can get some cardio into my routine. I want to change things up and maybe swim after doing my weight routine. Is this a good idea? Has anyone done this? I'm mostly concerned because the body temperature is high after a good workout so jumping into a pool may shock the body and be harmful. The pool at my gym is heated but the temperature is still cooler than the body. I was thinking of doing this because I like swimming more than the treadmill but realized the potential danger. What are you thoughts on this? Thanks for any feedback!


    I'm a high school swim coach. We always do our lifting before we get into the pool. You won't have any problems with your body temperature. By the time you get outta of the gym, into the locker room, changed, and then into the pool, you're temperature will have come down.
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    Mar 02, 2009 5:00 PM GMT
    I always used to swim after a workout or a long run, when there was a pool available. Swimming seemed like of kind of stretching exercise to me, plus it had aerobic value.

    My final step was some time in the sauna, to warm my muscles back up after the cool water, and prevent stiffness. I wish I could resume that routine now, I was never in better shape than when I did that.
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    Mar 02, 2009 8:30 PM GMT
    If you're up to it, haven't worn yourself totally out, and let your pulse, BP and body temp.some time to normalize before jumping to a pool filled with cold water. I'd advice you to stretch your muscles well before going to swim to avoid painful cramps, as well as before weight training.....and ofcourse you shower b4 jumping to the pool.
    I go for a swim and sauna after every weight training at the gym, never had any problems....but then again, I always warm up b4 actual training and stretch after.
    This all is ok, if you do NOT have any previous experiences of heart palpitatios or blood pressure probs during or after your excercise.
    Tomi
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    Mar 02, 2009 9:35 PM GMT
    Swimming after a work out is a great way to stretch out the muscles and get the benefit of the water massage at the same time. Remember, swimmers do this on purpose! If, however, you have any injured areas, it's always smart to enjoy your swim rather than set any speed records.icon_exclaim.gif
  • manpit209

    Posts: 213

    Mar 03, 2009 7:06 AM GMT
    animanimus saidi prefer to workout first and then swim but i find myself doing the opposite because if i swim first, i can do my laps and still have plenty of energy for working out with weights.

    but if i workout with weights first, my energy is too tapped to do many laps. i rationalize it by thinking that i'm losening my body up in the pool first, stretching my arms with each stroke, etc, so that i'm more limber when i later take to weights but i have no idea if that's really the physiology of it.

    my biggest problem with this routine is i have to shower twice, first to get the chlorine out of my hair and the second time after i work up a sweat. so the very biggest problem in all this, really, is towels. there is wisdom and then there are towels. you decide.


    My concern is also with towels. Swimming first then doing weights would mean I have to shower twice. Swimming after a workout means I rinse before getting into the pool then shower afterwards.

    It's good to know that the general consensus is that it's ok to swim after doing weights. If I could get up early enough in the morning I'd swim in the morning then do my weight routine in the afternoon. I guess I can try this new routine of weights then swim and see how that goes. That way I won't have to go to the gym in the morning. Thanks for all the tips!
  • jrs1

    Posts: 4388

    Sep 02, 2009 8:10 AM GMT

    I think you should swim first and then lift.

    Dryland is fine before swimming, seeing as it is light strength training, but heavy lifting I would recommend to be done after several miles of lap swimming.
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    Sep 22, 2011 6:32 PM GMT
    I swim after an hour of weights all the time at the gym. Swim for an hour almost straight. It relieves all muscle aches also. But I think you lose muscle mass and weight loss. I never feel like swimming before a workout. Just doesn't feel right.