Drinking Water: Cold or Warm?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 02, 2009 7:41 PM GMT
    At my gym there are two water fountains side by side. One is always ice-cold and the other is luke warm (room temperature).

    When I lift weights and do cardio I drink plenty of water- before, during, and after.

    Does anyone know if there is a difference between having the cold or warm water?

    Please cite study or source of information if referring to science-based advice.

    Thanks!!!



    Joe
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    Mar 02, 2009 9:36 PM GMT
    Chinese medicine would have you drink it at room temperature. Ice cold water (so loved by americans) shocks the system. I can´t bear ice cold water and drink all of mine at room temperature. It also means that you don´t waste space in the fridge and lower the energy needs.

  • Bunjamon

    Posts: 3161

    Mar 02, 2009 10:23 PM GMT
    Drinking room temperature water messes less with your natural body temperature. That aside, there's nothing more refreshing that some cool water when you're really warm.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 02, 2009 10:26 PM GMT
    Ice cold isn't necessarily good for you. But cold water is actually most easily absorbed compared to luke warm. That's why it's "refreshing"
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    Mar 02, 2009 10:36 PM GMT
    It takes energy to warm up cold water.

    By definition, 1 calorie is the amount of energy required to warm 1 ml of water by 1 °C.
    So, if you sip 100 ml of cold water, you're going to burn about 3000 calories to warm it up to body temp. Actually somewhat more, because metabolism isn't that efficient.

    However... somewhere along the way, the home ec/dumb jock crowd started calling kilocalories "calories." (Less scary, I guess.) So this only equates to about three "calories" on your power bar label. If you suck down a whole liter, it would burn about 30 kilocalories. That's less than one bite on a power bar.

    There is an old paper that's widely cited (in jock magazines) that was written by british physiology students, in which they claim to measure much more energy burn than this. However, their experiment had no controls, and their results are several orders of magnitude off the theoretical yield.

    I really doubt that it makes any significant difference. Except that ice cold water may cause pain in your dental work.
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    Mar 02, 2009 11:07 PM GMT
    Damnit, mindgarden beat me to it. Your body warms up the water before the water goes through the system; while doing this, the body burns calories. Go with the cold water ;)
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 02, 2009 11:12 PM GMT
    putting very cold substances into an internally hot body causes shock. Room temp or slightly cooled if you have to.. but not ice icon_eek.gif

    icon_eek.gif
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    Mar 02, 2009 11:48 PM GMT
    I don't think he meant arctic blast type cold icon_confused.gif

    I thought he meant "water with ice in it" type cold.
  • neon4u

    Posts: 1152

    Mar 03, 2009 9:46 PM GMT
    I think the body absorbs cold water quicker than it does warm. Cold water, as mentioned, is more refreshing especially after a long strenuous workout. Who wants to drink a glass of room temp water after a long run?... not me, I'll take the cold water, thank you.

    I also know that many cultures prefer drinking warm water. I don't know if this is due, as they think, to possible health concerns surrounding cold water... (I know in Italy I can't roll down the window on a bus or in a car because everyone is scared of getting sick from the summer air.) Many countries haven't, until more recently, had the ability to chill through refrigeration, hence they're just not use to cold beverages. Where I visit, they don't even want ice in their drinks, whether its sodas or alcoholic drinks.

    I guess it comes down to preference.
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    Mar 03, 2009 9:56 PM GMT
    muchmorethanmuscle saidYes, I remember a recent article that talks about how drinking cold beverages negatively affects heart health.
    That claim requires a citation.

    Considering humans have adapted to cold climates as well as warm, drink cold water from melted ice or tepid water from desert pools, their body can handle a great range of temperatures.

    In Phoenix, tap water is quite warm, but in Winnipeg the tap water is tremendously cold. This would suggest a greater incidence of heart health issues in Winnipeg, right? Show me that data.
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    Mar 04, 2009 5:31 AM GMT
    muchmorethanmuscle said

    So in reality, if I were going to consume a cold beverage I'd rather do it alone instead of with a meal.

    O.K. Adrien, so - no problem - if I ever get a chance to build you a drink at my place - I'll leave out the ice!
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    Mar 04, 2009 5:42 AM GMT
    Lostboy saidputting very cold substances into an internally hot body causes shock. Room temp or slightly cooled if you have to.. but not ice icon_eek.gif

    icon_eek.gif


    Sounds like the time a date put an ice cube up my butt.
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    Mar 04, 2009 5:50 AM GMT
    GuerrillaSodomite said:
    Sounds like the time a date put an ice cube up my butt.

    ..........and this reminds me of the time a guy blew me with an ice cube in his mouth. Amazing!
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    Mar 04, 2009 6:01 AM GMT
    Jockbod48 saidGuerrillaSodomite said:
    Sounds like the time a date put an ice cube up my butt.

    ..........and this reminds me of the time a guy blew me with an ice cube in his mouth. Amazing!


    It felt great. And then I shot it across the room which startled the cat.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 04, 2009 11:12 AM GMT
    Ice to use to preserve the dead.
  • Latenight30

    Posts: 1525

    Mar 04, 2009 12:24 PM GMT
    cooler water is better also if you do the fancy resturant thing properly they will serve soup, warm to help wake up digestion and salad is served last.
    just one of thoose fancy tid bits. We have a water cooler at work and I always do part warm and part cool to get it right
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    Mar 04, 2009 5:43 PM GMT
    We actually discussed this in my thermodynamics class this past fall -- god knows why, as my professor was a 65+ y.o. jewish man that probably hadn't been to the gym in several decades -- and basically the reason to drink ice cold water after exercising is to more rapidly decrease body temperature and speed up absorption. The flux of heat from your body to the water will be greatest if there is a larger disparity between the two temperatures (following Newton's Law of Heating/Cooling). And yes, this does mean that your body will end up burning more calories to return to normal temperature, but the caloric expenditure is appreciably small. Also cool water, unlike lukewarm water, does not stimulate the stomach or prepare it for food, which means the water will not be retained in the stomach but instead will pass more quickly through to the intestines for absorption (i.e. rehydration). Ice cold water, however, cannot be easily absorbed into the cells; it must first reach or be close to body temperature. As such, cold water will regulate body temperature and get water to the cells, but warm water will be more easily absorbed... My professor basically didn't come up with a cogent argument for either, but I usually drink cool (neither warm nor cold) water in an attempt to get benefits of both... I can try to dig up the journal articles he gave us for it if you want to read more.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 04, 2009 5:48 PM GMT
    I'm confused....

    it' seems there's disagreement whether the body absorbs cold or lukewarm water faster. even in the references you guys dug up.

    now I'm not a physician, but I've always learned in bio, phys. ed. and first aid, that to rehydrate, the lukewarm water is absorbed faster the closer it is to body temperature. Makes good sense too. the cold water was said to be luxury, it's just refreshing when you're hot.

    this is just what I've learned years ago... are my school books out dated ??? LOL
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 04, 2009 6:26 PM GMT
    I was able to find a recent research article that concluded that a cold liquid increased exercises capacity versus a warm liquid. The study was done on cyclists

    Cold Drink Ingestion Improves Exercise Endurance Capacity in the Heat

    Jason K.W. Lee; Susan M. Shirreffs; Ronald J. Maughan
    Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2008;40(9):1637-1644. ©2008 American College of Sports Medicine
    Posted 09/23/2008


    The conclusion from the abstract is as follows
    Compared with a drink at 37°C, the ingestion of a cold drink before and during exercise in the heat reduced physiological strain (reduced heat accumulation) during exercise, leading to an improved endurance capacity (23 ± 6%).

    The results of the present study do not constitute endorsement by the American College of Sports Medicine

    I hope Mickey is satisfied with the citationicon_smile.gif
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    Mar 04, 2009 7:12 PM GMT
    muchmorethanmuscle saidMickey, you silly ass rabbit...
    Hmmm, not exactly a citation, but I did the Google thing.

    Some search parameters I used (in several combinations):
    cold water heart health arteriosclerosis atherosclerosis

    Your note:
    muchmorethanmuscle saidThe article went to go into detail about how people with arteriosclerosis or cholesterol buildup in their veins and arteries can aggravate these blockages by drinking cold beverages.
    ...raised some questions for me. Was "arteriosclerosis or cholesterol buildup" an either/or list, or was cholesterol buildup a clarifier for arteriosclerosis?

    Since several pages of search results brought no such article in to view (hardly "all over the internet"), you present me with a challenge: do I take your word that your memory is sufficient to cite an article you read, and that your naturally skeptical nature would have sourced the medical study that the article cites?

    Because, in all honesty, your claim makes sense, but such a fallacious trap (that an idea seems reasonable) can as likely produce a dangerous (at the worst) or pointless (at the best) medical result.

    The one article that I did find regards a congenital condition that presents itself when immersing in ice water (but no mention is made of drinking it): http://www.everydayhealth.com/heart-health-specialist/chest-pains-ice.aspx. And no mention is made that this is a problem for people with other heart health issues, much less healthy guys like me.

    Now, I enjoy your posts, in that they provide me with great entertainment with your unqualified medical claims, but--my condescending overlord--you are no doctor, and must do a better job here on this website when dispensing unsubstantiated medical advice.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 04, 2009 7:38 PM GMT
    I like my water ice cold!
  • EricLA

    Posts: 3461

    Mar 04, 2009 7:51 PM GMT
    When I work out, I prefer cold water. I always try to keep my heart rate up when I'm working out and the breaks between sets short. The A/C in one of my weekday gym never seems to be on, or at least it never seems very cool, so I usually start sweating profusely in little time. The cold water helps give me some relief between exercises, otherwise I think I'd fatigue early and wouldn't be able to finish my session.
  • Sayrnas

    Posts: 847

    Mar 04, 2009 7:54 PM GMT
    Water is water. Just make sure it isn't remotely close to boiling or frozen over and I'll drink it at what ever temp it's at.
  • MCVA

    Posts: 69

    Mar 04, 2009 8:17 PM GMT
    Lostboy saidChinese medicine would have you drink it at room temperature. Ice cold water (so loved by americans) shocks the system. I can´t bear ice cold water and drink all of mine at room temperature. It also means that you don´t waste space in the fridge and lower the energy needs.



    You actually spend less energy with a fridge that is full vs. a fridge that has open space available
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 04, 2009 8:54 PM GMT
    Lostboy said It also means that you don´t waste space in the fridge and lower the energy needs.



    Actually, keeping cold water in a closed container lowers energy needs because most of the cooling that goes on in the frig is cooling the air around the already cold things that are in the frig as the cold air escapes from the frig when you open the door. Therefore, the more full you keep your frig the less energy it will use.

    As for the cold water question, I belong to the camp that says cold water is better for you, to loose a little weight and to hydrate the body faster.