Night Shift Health Issues

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    Mar 06, 2009 7:20 AM GMT
    People working in night shifts generally face health related issues due to disturbed routine and target pressure. Recommend to me all the possible solutions to this problem so that the employee’s health is retained without affecting the output of the company.
  • junknemesis

    Posts: 682

    Mar 06, 2009 7:40 AM GMT
    Um... there are problems working at night? I have worked 12-8am for over a year at a hotel. May I ask to see a link to such a study cause I want to know as well what potential health risks I might be privy too and how to avoid them!
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    Mar 06, 2009 8:12 AM GMT
    I don't think this is true... do you have anything to backup your story? Proof, please!
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    Mar 06, 2009 9:06 AM GMT
    It is said that people that work overnight have a shorter lifespan.

    If you are sleeping during the day make sure you do not get overheated. Cover your windows if need be or move your bed to a cooler room even if it is the living room as long as you don't have roommates. A sleeping mask may help as well as earplugs. People you know will call you during the day because they know you are home and wonder why you are sleeping even though they know you work at night. Yes, they are stupid. Turn off the ringer if it keeps happening, but make sure you get enough sleep. Having black sheets on your bed will help. Note that turning off the ringer on your phone and wearing earplugs could cause a safety issue.
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    Mar 06, 2009 11:40 AM GMT
    The study looked at 5 men and 5 women who participated in an 8 day study. Each ate and slept on a 28-hour cycle. All of the participants ate 4 identical-calorie meals. When their cycle shifted about 12 hours out of phase - sleeping during the day, working at night. Results showed blood sugar spikes, insulin resistance (pre-diabetes), decreased leptin, which decreases energy burning and increases cravings for food (increases obesity risk and heart disease), decreased sleep efficacy, increased blood pressure, cortisol rising and falling at wrong times. Although the sample size was small, this study still showed increased risk for a premature death among night-shift workers.
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    Mar 06, 2009 2:47 PM GMT
    The bank that I used to work for has operations around the world and we had people in a number of roles working overnight shifts. It's v expensive cUS$550 per month), but one drug that the company's doctors prescribed to allow people to function during the day was Provigil.

    In the last few years before I switched careers I travelled a huge amount (200+ days per year and 600K miles usu across lots of time zones). It was not unusual for me to spend only three nights a week sleeping in a real bed (as opposed to on a plane) and even then the beds were often in different time zones. Provigil didn't do much for me. I had scripts for Adderall to stay awake and Rozerem, rohypnal (sp?) and Ambien CR to sleep. The toll on my health (bp, weight, energy levels and general vulnerability to colds, etc) was huge, but luckily reversible once I stopped the sleep deprivation and jet lag.
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    Mar 06, 2009 3:12 PM GMT
    CINCYMSN08 saidThe study looked at 5 men and 5 women ...


    I wonder if they considered themselves night people. I know I feel I am more awake after the sun goes down.
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    Mar 06, 2009 4:08 PM GMT
    Well sure it's unhealthy, if you spend the entire time sucking cock! Perhaps the solution is a real job...icon_eek.gif
  • shoelessj

    Posts: 511

    Mar 06, 2009 5:39 PM GMT
    I don't doubt this is true, but not sure of the study method. Instead of looking at 10 volunteers for a week or so, they should have actually studied people who work the overnight shifts, for a prolonged period of time.

    I've worked the 12am to 8am shift, either two or three nights a week, for three years now, and can attest that it messes you up in many ways. You eat at odd hours, unless you cook and bring your food ahead of time its tough to eat healthy, you never have enough sleep (on my day off i sleep about 10 hours to make up for lost sleep), and i wonder if your immune system is compromised by the weird hours and how your body is always trying to adjust, especially when say, you do something with friends or loved ones on their off hours or off days.

    Emotionally i think it takes a toll, too. If you work nights or overnights, you're the one who either can never meet friends or new people (who wants to get a drink at 10am?) and when you do hang out with friends, you're the one who has to leave early and can't drink and who can't really have as much fun as the others because at the back of your mind you're always counting how long it is until you have to leave for work. If you are in a relationship, or even just meet someone and try to be boyfriends with them, the odds are against you, unless of course, they work odd hours too. Also, since most workplaces have much fewer people working at night than during the day, you don't get as much human interaction with your co-workers so its tough to bond with them and also very hard to feel connected to your workplace, get the news, get the gossip, get the heads-up on what other positions may be opening, have a chance for higher up supervisors to see you and your work.

    That being said, most everyone i know who works the midnight and night shifts has really good skin because they hardly ever see the sun. and we are able to go to the gym, the beach, shop, etc., early in the day, when all those places are far less crowded.

    And yeah, i've asked my boss to consider moving me to a different sked.
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    Mar 06, 2009 6:44 PM GMT
    I know as for me it is true.I worked for 2 years from 10pm-6am,stocking in a grocery store.I never could sleep during the day,it increased the frequency of migraine headaches,I dropped down to 130lbs.probably as a result of not being allowed to stop for breaks or lunch.I developed high blood pressure,I took prescription and over the counter sleep aids and all that did was make me feel like a zombie,I was so irritable I snapped at everyone I came in contact with.

    My doctor advised me to find a different line of work,well I got smart and took his advise,I'm still in the grocery business but I refuse to work 3rd shift.Now the latest I have to work is midnight,no longer have high blood pressure,don't have to take anything to sleep,gained the weight back,get much less headaches.

    So as for any study that says night shift is bad for your health,I would believe it.
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    Mar 07, 2009 4:40 AM GMT
    Nowadays, commercial organizations are taking the help of outside agencies which do a proper audit of the employees and train and educate, regarding issues like stress management, blood sugar issues, absenteeism, nutrition, etc. One such company is http://ceowellness.com/. Do contact them in the case of any needed assistance.
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    Mar 07, 2009 3:31 PM GMT
    Did you guys just hear about the study about the health effects of daylight savings time?

    5% increase in heart attacks on spring forward

    5% decrease in heart attacks on fall back

    I'd like to read the study to pick it apart. What type of study? Sample size? power? confounding variables?