Piriformis/Psoas

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 14, 2009 3:52 AM GMT
    Hi lads, Does anyone have any good exercises for this? Thanks!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 14, 2009 7:59 AM GMT
    If you're injured, or tight I can tell you my experience and give you my rehab routine. I assume there's some kind of issue because no one really wakes up saying "Man I gotta get to the gym, it's piriformis day!" or that they want "ripped hips."

    If there is an issue, massage therapy is the first thing you need to look into. The reason why I had such a long recovery is because it's the last thing I considered. I did not know enough about the illipsoas to know it was causing all of my problems. I'm 95% better now as long as I'm vigilant with my stretches.

    Let me know if you want me to go into more detail.
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    Mar 14, 2009 9:49 AM GMT
    Pain from both of these muscles are treated with stretching exercises along with other modalities.

    The piriformis syndrome mimics the pain from lumbar vertebral disk disease and can be confused with sciatica. There is pain in the buttocks which may radiate down the leg.
    http://jaxmed.com/massage/pirformis_stretches.htm


    Iliopsoas syndrome is common in runners, jumpers, ballet dancers. There is pain in the groin area with running and going up and down stairs
    http://www.floota.com/PsoasStretch1.html

    There are more stretches for these muscle groups available on the web. I wasn't able to find one web site that included all the various stretches. Just Google the topic
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    Mar 14, 2009 12:31 PM GMT
    yeah these muscles are prone to tightness due to poor posture than anything really, so you wanna stretch them out and strengthen your glutes and abdominals to correct it


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    Mar 15, 2009 4:08 AM GMT
    Thanks all for your replies! This just hit me out of the blue a few weeks ago. I've always been active, but according to a chiro I have posture problems and I should not have been jogging uphill on a treadmill. Who knew? I sure didn't. I was simply trying to maximize my time at the gym.

    Luckily, I feel so much better now, and I am doing stretching exercises every time I go to the gym (something I unwisely eschewed in the past).

    If you have any fave strecthing exercises I'd be happy to learn more. Thanks again!


  • slasherOCD

    Posts: 43

    Mar 15, 2009 4:29 AM GMT
    The piriformis stretch where you cross the ankle at the knee works best with some one applying the pressure for you. Do it where they apply resistance up to the point where your are aggravated. At that point you apply resistance on the other person for a few secs Then relax while the other person pushes you further. Do that about 3 times on each leg. You'll loosen up quickly.
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    Mar 15, 2009 4:38 AM GMT
    These are the stretches I do.

    1. Standing Quad stretch, grab foot from behind, and hold for 1.5-2 min

    2. Kneeling lunge: A forward lunge with your knee on the ground hold for 1.5-2 min will stretch psoas

    3. Psoas Stretch: Lie down on bed, or bench, plant one foot on the ground, take a yoga strap and pull toward the back of your neck as far as you can comfortbably, hold for at least a minute.

    4. Yoga pose Pigeon: Google for explanation

    5. Yoga pose Cobra: Google for explanation, do not do this if you have lower back problems.

    6. Piriformis stretch: Lie down on a flat surface pull one knee toward you leg will be bent. Turn leg (like you would if you were going to cross a leg over you knee and stretch.

    7. Piriformis stretch: Lie with both knees bent, cross foot over knee, reach between the space and hug your leg toward you from behind.

  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Mar 15, 2009 4:48 AM GMT
    Pilates! A good pilates class well work your piriformis and psoas. As far as exercising it, it's really important to release it, and often stretch is not enough. I strongly recommend getting a black foam roller and rolling out the psoas and using a pinky ball to release your piriformis. Any good pilates class will do this with you.
  • UncleverName

    Posts: 741

    Mar 15, 2009 5:44 AM GMT
    noren saidI should not have been jogging uphill on a treadmill.


    Does this activity especially tighten the psoas and piriformis muscles?
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Mar 15, 2009 5:52 AM GMT
    UncleverName said
    noren saidI should not have been jogging uphill on a treadmill.


    Does this activity especially tighten the psoas and piriformis muscles?


    Yes. You use your psoas to help raise your leg in conjunction with the quads (one of the many things you do with your psoas). So when you're walking up a stair case, theoretically, you should use your psoas more than anything else.

    The reason people have psoas and piriformis problems is that they don't use them correctly. Most people compensate with the powerhouse muscles, i.e. the quads, hamstrings, and glutes. When this occurs, your other muscles don't work out and develop to their potential, making them vulnerable. So when you do finally exert them, they don't have the ability to perform, becoming tight.

    You must, must, must release these muscles. I know stretching isn't really talked about in the gym world, but your psoas is not the same as your bicep. Those two muscles are some of your most important and constantly used parts of your body and they do not function in the same light.

    You can't effectively build strength in either of them if they are too tight to perform. Release them, let them rest, and slowly perform isolating exercises. Remember if either of those muscles is out of alignment, it throws off your lower back and knees, which throws off your neck and shoulders and feet, which throws off everything else. Many aches throughout the body are actually caused my imbalances in these two specific muscles.