How often do you increase your weight?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 16, 2009 5:40 PM GMT
    I just wondering how often other guys see strength increases in their weights. I am going to use my bench press for example, I can do 8-10 reps at 245 lbs and 5-6 reps of 275 lbs, but have yet to go over 275 lbs (6-8 Reps) or do more than 6 reps at 275. Ive been stuck at this plateau for a while now -- 3 months.

    How often do you guys increase your weight?

    Should I increase my weight even though it might mean lower reps?

    Any tips on how to increase strength?
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Mar 16, 2009 7:02 PM GMT
    Depends on your goal. Do you want to lift heavier just to say you can lift heavier? Or are you not getting the results you want?

    I increase my weight whenever doing more than 8 reps is too easy for me.
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    Mar 16, 2009 7:07 PM GMT
    More fuel and more rest may be necessary in order that you may get 'stronger'. Also, you may want to change your whole routine alltogether so that you may "shock" your body and break the plateau.

    Just a common sense thought.

    Yet, I am not a major bodybuilder.

    Good Luck! Keep us posted on your progress!!!


    Joe
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    Mar 16, 2009 7:08 PM GMT
    I want to put on more mass but am concerned because my strength hasn't increase and I have been lifting the same weight for a while.
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    Mar 16, 2009 7:37 PM GMT
    I think most people stop gaining because they are doing too much volume. You may be doing too many sets or not giving your muscles enough time after training to recover.
  • Timbales

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    Mar 16, 2009 7:37 PM GMT
    Do you usually work with a spotter? you could try drop sets.
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    Mar 16, 2009 8:03 PM GMT
    I am constantly trying for one more rep, an extra set, a little more weight. Weight lifting is boring if I am not always challenging myself to do better. Now, compared to the weight you are pushing I am dainty little flower. But perhaps if you change your focus from weight to other things you can eventually overcome what is keeping your weight from improving.
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    Mar 16, 2009 10:22 PM GMT
    I found out recently that I use increased weight if I do not take my log with me to the gym. Has to be one of those mental things like when I realized that I had trouble going from the 25lb dumbbell to the 30lb dumbbell because of the increase of the dumbbell size.
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    Mar 16, 2009 10:46 PM GMT
    hapakun saidI just wondering how often other guys see strength increases in their weights. I am going to use my bench press for example, I can do 8-10 reps at 245 lbs and 5-6 reps of 275 lbs, but have yet to go over 275 lbs (6-8 Reps) or do more than 6 reps at 275. Ive been stuck at this plateau for a while now -- 3 months.

    How often do you guys increase your weight?

    Should I increase my weight even though it might mean lower reps?

    Any tips on how to increase strength?


    I think you probably know the answer. It depends. If you're young, eating buttloads of food, sleeping a bunch, and a classic mesomorph, you can make gains regularly. If you're partying all night, starving yourself, and stressed out, gains will be slower. Gains will also be MUCH slower in an advanced athlete as opposed to a newbie.

    Anyone, be they 16 to 80, can make an 80% increase in strength in as little as 16 weeks in their initial training year. That's fact. Some folks are very weak, untrained, and don't have neurological conditioning. Changes can happen very quickly to folks who are just beginning. That rate of change drops off after years of training, but, you develop "muscle memory" and can go back to where you left off almost immediately if you're an advanced athlete and take a break. E.g., I hardly ever get "sore" after 34 years in the weight room. My body is heavily adapted to resistance training after 3 decades.

    Don't forget, you can look like the guy who can move the 600 pound weight, or actually be the guy who can move the 600 pound weight. They aren't the same. Study up on hypertrophy and it will all make sense.

    To answer your question: it varies, and a fairly wide range of factors...genetics, experience, calories, rest, recovery, training method.

    Progressive overload can be good, but resistance training is very intense, and it's very easy to overtrain. Steady as she goes. You can try some advanced training techniques, but, the number one thing you can do to get over the hump is to EAT.

    Good luck!