Quinoa- suitable post-workout food?

  • nhnelson

    Posts: 113

    Mar 17, 2009 8:30 AM GMT
    It seems that the carb/protein ratio is ideal, though because it's a plant protein, I'm not sure how much of it is readily absorbed by the body. Perhaps pair it with an animal/dairy/soy protein?

    Discuss.
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    Mar 17, 2009 8:40 AM GMT
    quinoa is a complete protein so there should be no problem. Plant proteins can all be "absorbed by the body" the problem is in a lack of all essential amino acids, which isn't a problem with quinoa.

    The problem with quinoa is that it is a complex carbohydrate. Post-workout you want some fast absorbing carbs. Not to mention that you need your nutrition quickly after a workout. How do you plan on eating it? You don't have time to go home, wash it, cook it, and eat it. By then your body will be starving for glycogen and protein.

    That said, quinoa is a great grain and you should eat plenty of it.
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    Mar 17, 2009 3:58 PM GMT
    Add very fresh sauteed greens, garlic, maybe some pine nuts or other nuts. Add a chicken bullion cube to the cooking water for more flavor. Great stuff that quinoa!
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    Jun 07, 2009 2:52 PM GMT
    MunchingZombie said
    That said, quinoa is a great grain and you should eat plenty of it.


    Not to pick nits but quinoa isn't a grain.
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    Jun 07, 2009 6:08 PM GMT
    MunchingZombie saidquinoa is a complete protein so there should be no problem. Plant proteins can all be "absorbed by the body" the problem is in a lack of all essential amino acids, which isn't a problem with quinoa.

    The problem with quinoa is that it is a complex carbohydrate. Post-workout you want some fast absorbing carbs. Not to mention that you need your nutrition quickly after a workout. How do you plan on eating it? You don't have time to go home, wash it, cook it, and eat it. By then your body will be starving for glycogen and protein.

    That said, quinoa is a great grain and you should eat plenty of it.


    Too bad it can't be prepared ahead of time and quickly reheated when desired

    unless.....
    maybe it can!

    Depending on how it is prepared, a person could even take it with them and consume it while leaving the gym! Perhaps I will try to adapt one of the energy bar recipes in other threads to include Quinoa
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    Jun 07, 2009 6:13 PM GMT
    I've prepared quinoa in potfuls, added vanilla-flavored soy milk and raisins, heat it up and it's a perfect breakfast. A good alternative to oatmeal when prepared well. I would just scoop some out of the pot each morning into work, add the soy milk and raisins, then warm in a microwave for only a few seconds.
  • metlboy

    Posts: 105

    Jun 27, 2009 5:50 PM GMT
    I know some stores sell quinoa flakes (rolled like oats). Those probably cook faster and/or you could make granola with them.
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    Jun 27, 2009 5:55 PM GMT
    Ask Paradox about Quinoa. He's apparently an expert on it. He'll be able to answer ALL of your questions.
    Cheers,
    Keith
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    Jun 27, 2009 6:04 PM GMT

    "Nutritionally, quinoa might be considered a supergrain--although it is not really a grain, but the seed of a leafy plant that's distantly related to spinach. Quinoa has excellent reserves of Protein, and unlike other grains, is not missing the amino acid lysine, so the protein is more complete (a trait it shares with other "non-true" grains such as buckwheat and amaranth). The World Health Organization has rated the quality of protein in quinoa at least equivalent to that in milk. Quinoa offers more iron than other grains and contains high levels of potassium and riboflavin, as well as other B vitamins: B6, niacin, and thiamin. It is also a good source of magnesium, zinc, copper, and manganese, and has some folate (folic acid).

    An ancient grainlike product that has recently been "rediscovered" in this country, quinoa has a light, delicate taste, and can be substituted for almost any other grain
    ."

    from:
    http://www.wholehealthmd.com/ME2/dirmod.asp?nm=Reference+Library&type=AWHN_Foods&mod=Foods&mid=&id=D18F2C4462B74726B0C2D1FD8A8A65B8&tier=2#Why_Eat_It

    1 cup of cooked quinoa has 8 grams of protein
    whereas 1 cup of raw quinoa has 24 grams of protein!
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    Jun 27, 2009 6:07 PM GMT
    My first exposure to quinoa was while staying with friends in PDX over Christmas break. I recall the box billed it as a staple of some native Americans. But it was stocked in the foreign foods section of the supermarket. icon_razz.gif
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    Jun 27, 2009 10:57 PM GMT
    Beaux saidMy first exposure to quinoa was while staying with friends in PDX over Christmas break. I recall the box billed it as a staple of some native Americans. But it was stocked in the foreign foods section of the supermarket. icon_razz.gif


    It´s primarily associated with the andean region, and the Incas. It´s a big deal in Bolivia and Peru. That´s part of america icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Jul 01, 2009 12:44 AM GMT
    Quinoa is a great carb source but generally nutrition experts say a post workout drink consisting of fast carbs with some protein is optimal for restoring muscle glycogen and an hour after your shake you can eat the quinoa.COLORED TEXT GOES HERE