All natural Organic Products

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 19, 2009 10:34 PM GMT
    Soo... I enjoy frequent trips to Wholefoods and the late Elephant Farm for my organic items... be it food, products or more I try to go organic in everything i can do. However I recently spent almost 30 bucks on this conditioner by Phyto http://www.phyto.fr/default.php?pageId=936&siteId=2&langId=2 Well anyways I used it, and loved it. The next morning I wake up and i have A huge dandruff problem now. I had to deep condition with my old shit twice to get my scalp back to its old self. Anyways... has anyone else found that all natural or organic products, because they are so pure can do more harm than good? Like they play more on allergies, I must have been allergic to something in the conditioner.
  • metta

    Posts: 39099

    Mar 20, 2009 1:03 AM GMT
    Nope. I have not found that to be the case. I think that there are more problems with using synthetic materials than natural products. However, there are good and bad natural/organic products just like anything else. You just need to find what works for you. People can be allergic to anything and what a person has problems with will vary with each person. One problem that I have been seeing more and more recently is the misuse of the word organic. Yesterday, I saw a manufacture say that thir polyvinyl shower curtains were organic because the colors used on them were colors found in nature. icon_confused.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 20, 2009 1:15 AM GMT
    Also, and especially with products like shampoo, companies can get away with calling themselves natural and still have petroleum based products. Dr. Bronner's is actually in the middle of suing some major "natural" product makers like Kiss My Face, because of false claims.

    Check out and look up the ingredient list.

    And, as a fellow dandruff sufferer nothing really works other than chemical based products like Selsun Blue. Supposedly Tea Tree oils work, but I haven't had any lasting success. I'd be interested in going to an acupuncturist or herbalist to see if they have other suggestions.

    Now, please forget that I just said I have dandruff.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 20, 2009 1:25 AM GMT
    Most organic isn't truly organic these days. There are two types "big Organic" stolen by food companies and monitered by the government, and "Little Organic" ... mostly bought from small chain stores which sell local organic food.

    Organic isn't just about "not putting crap in food " or not using pestisides/etc. "Orangic salad mix, made in Cali and shipped to Maine is not truly Organic according to the founders of the movement--think of all the fossil fuels burned to ship the bag of salad mix across-country.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 20, 2009 4:46 AM GMT
    I used Organic products for a little while, but then I spoke to a doctor friend of mine who told me that most organic products aren't worth the cost with little benefit over their non-organic counterparts. Especially with fruits and vegetables which he said are the biggest waste in money. He said as long as you wash the fruits and veggies before eating them, you're ok with the non-organic versions and that with some of the natural fertilizers that organic fruits and veggies use (feces, anyone?), you could get some pretty nasty viruses just as easily. Of course that was just his opinion.

    I just look at the cost and think, 'Come on,...there is no way that these organic products should be as expensive as they are". That made me switch back.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 20, 2009 4:49 AM GMT
    bocaguyfl said

    I just look at the cost and think, 'Come on,...there is no way that these organic products should be as expensive as they are". That made me switch back.


    Big Organic (industrialized) = no
    Little Organic = yes
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 20, 2009 4:59 AM GMT
    im glad this sparked an interest... as my hair falls out I will continue to follow your comments. LOL no i dont normally have a dandruff problem so I think after a couple of days of soaking my head in vegetable oil i should be alright ;)
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 20, 2009 1:00 PM GMT
    The most violently irritating personal care product I've ever used is a shampoo from Aubrey Organics. No matter how tightly I'd keep my eyes closed, the stuff seeped in, stung like hell, and made my eyes extremely bloodshot. On top of that, it left my hair feeling like straw. Aubrey shampoos are soap based, which probably explains why no one else makes shampoo with soap.

    As for household cleaning products, with one exception, I use ordinary ones from the grocery store because the all natural stuff costs more and performs poorly. The one exception is Ecover fabric softener, which smells absolutely wonderful.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 20, 2009 8:28 PM GMT
    I buy organic foods for the absence of pesticides, hormones, and antibiotics. I also have found organic fruits and vegetables to have way more favor. Organic bananas blew me away when I first started eating them.

    Genetic manipulation doesnt bother me so much depending on what kind of manipulation. "Manipulation" which is basically breeding cultivars for a desired characteristic doesnt bother me at all. Splicing in genes from other living sources, that is something I would have to assess on a case by case basis. I am not going to be dogmatic that any genetic manipulation is automatically evil!

    I have generally found "organic" household products to be disappointing.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 21, 2009 12:46 AM GMT
    bocaguyfl saidI used Organic products for a little while, but then I spoke to a doctor friend of mine who told me that most organic products aren't worth the cost with little benefit over their non-organic counterparts. Especially with fruits and vegetables which he said are the biggest waste in money. He said as long as you wash the fruits and veggies before eating them, you're ok with the non-organic versions and that with some of the natural fertilizers that organic fruits and veggies use (feces, anyone?), you could get some pretty nasty viruses just as easily. Of course that was just his opinion.

    I just look at the cost and think, 'Come on,...there is no way that these organic products should be as expensive as they are". That made me switch back.


    I think that it is important to understand that organic is often a standard that is for the benefit of the land, farmer, and the environment, more than it is for the consumer.

    Organic products, especially imported products are incredibly complicated and so it is a wise move to look beyond a certification or a seal and that the more you can know where your products are coming from and who is producing them and how the better off you are. Once you learn how intensive it is to truely farm organically you will better be able to understand the cost associated with organic products (although factory farm organics are most likely over-priced). Another reason to cut out as many middle men as possible. An organic tomato directly from the farmer is typically far cheaper (or at least the same as) than a conventional tomato and the money is directly benefiting the person who grew it and not the supply chain that brought it to you.

    Cosmetic products are particularly difficult. There are plenty of artisan soap makers, I would suggest looking for one at a local farmer's market. Soap when made with all of it's intended components can be all you really need (often cream is removed from soap, which is then in turn re-sold to you as lotion when the soap you purchase dries out your skin).
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 23, 2009 9:33 PM GMT
    from an article on yahoo on ways to save your money...

    5) Organic Produce

    Sure, buying organic makes you feel like you’re doing the right thing, but it isn't always the best choice for your wallet. Fruits and vegetables like kiwis, sweet corn and broccoli require very little pesticide to grow. Others -- like avocados, onions and pineapples -- have thick or peelable skins that reduce your exposure to harmful chemicals. “Any pesticide that remains is not getting through,” says Lempert. For a handy reminder as you shop, download the Environmental Working Group’s wallet-sized organic produce guide.

    Potential Savings: Organic broccoli costs $2.99 per pound at online grocer FreshDirect, which also offers conventional broccoli for $1.49. A pound of navel oranges is $4 for the organic and $2 for conventional. Someone buying a pound of each item weekly could save $182 over the course of a year.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 23, 2009 10:09 PM GMT
    I am really sorry that this happened to you NiCkWoLf. I agree with the other posters that there are good and bad organic products. May I suggest that you don't wash your hair everyday (I can already hear the "yuck" and "gross" from the gay contingent... LOL!). This should take care of your dandruff.

    I am also sorry that your post has been hijacked into the discussion of "organic" vs. non-organic. With that I would like to also regress.

    I think that the way chet_desmond has so intelligently talked about "organic" in his posts is very simply laid out. Thank you!

    Unfortunately, I have to pick on bocaguyfl for a moment (and I know that this will come with some retaliation). I don't mean to offend, but bocaguyfl this isn't about you. It is about how organic farming is good for the environment. I understand your points about price, well-being and quality, but remember the bigger picture. This is about ceasing the use of chemicals that end up in the water of lakes and streams, keeping the wildlife safe from these byproducts and using farm land in a sustainable way as to continue using the soil and not "using up" the soil.

    Lastly, I would like to concur with Caslon that genetic manipulation is mostly harmless. It has been done for many centuries. Just as an example... Carrots as we know them today are actually a hybrid of several different species from Europe and around the Mediterranean. They were developed in Holland in the 17th century. This is not the only example. Now let me talk out of the other side of my mouth. I am not into genetically modifying foods so that it turns a food source that stores better, grows faster and makes more bountiful crops which then become invasive (ie. corn). Hopefully this will make sense. I am not into debating my logic on the topic I am just putting out there for thought.

    With everything said above, I try to buy organic whenever possible. It makes me feel better about my contribution to more ecofriendly living.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 24, 2009 2:07 AM GMT
    Well I was allergic to the Mallow in the conditioner. I switched to Johnathan Products 100% vegan shampoo and conditioner and its all good ;) and I agree that in most cases you should be ok with genetically altered produce but do try to go for organic whenever you can. Especially if u have kids. U don't want that Winco foods hormonal chicken to give your 7 year old boobs.