Post-workout Tingle-hands

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    Mar 19, 2009 11:13 PM GMT
    Hi there,

    I've only recently started working out, with a trainer, and it's going quite well - for someone who's not done any deliberate exercise since birth.

    Tonight was my best session yet, in terms of what I achieved, and how good I felt at the end of it.

    The only thing was, at the end, as I was doing my cool down stretches, I had pins and needles in my hands. I did heavier weights today than I'd done before (which I'm sure most of you would think of as pathetic starter weights). Not a gentle pleasant tingle, but a harsh slightly painful one. It only lasted a minute or two, and then it was gone.

    Is this a normal result of working out? Or is it something I should worry about?

    Advice much appreciated.

    Thank you.
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    Mar 20, 2009 1:51 AM GMT
    I wouldnt worry about it at all. I get them from time to time, in fact I kinda like them.

    And I wish I could give you sound medical reasoning behind it but in my opinion it could be your body adapting to heavier wieghts, not enough oxygen flowing to your hands during the workout, or a lack of proper hydration.

  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    Mar 20, 2009 1:56 AM GMT
    Hmmmm.
    Whenever I have tingling in my arms or hands, I know that it's time to pay a visit to my chiropractor. After an adjustment, my entire body is loose and limber, and no more tingles.
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    Mar 20, 2009 6:28 AM GMT
    bluejamie saidHi there,

    I've only recently started working out, with a trainer, and it's going quite well - for someone who's not done any deliberate exercise since birth.

    Tonight was my best session yet, in terms of what I achieved, and how good I felt at the end of it.

    The only thing was, at the end, as I was doing my cool down stretches, I had pins and needles in my hands. I did heavier weights today than I'd done before (which I'm sure most of you would think of as pathetic starter weights). Not a gentle pleasant tingle, but a harsh slightly painful one. It only lasted a minute or two, and then it was gone.

    Is this a normal result of working out? Or is it something I should worry about?

    Advice much appreciated.

    Thank you.


    No biggy. You nerves are literally getting larger. It's called neurological adaptation.

    Your nervous system as been running on low voltage and the nerves are, literally, getting larger to fire at higher current level to support the exercise.

    Neat, huh?

    It's pretty common, especially in very untrained people.

    If it persists, you may have an inflammation that's bugging a nerve, but, because you report it in both hands, it'll probably just stuff adapting. If the issue persists, see a good sports medicine doctor.

    Your brain is also learning how to process that data. That's called propioception.
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    Mar 20, 2009 6:30 AM GMT
    chuckystud said
    bluejamie saidHi there,

    I've only recently started working out, with a trainer, and it's going quite well - for someone who's not done any deliberate exercise since birth.

    Tonight was my best session yet, in terms of what I achieved, and how good I felt at the end of it.

    The only thing was, at the end, as I was doing my cool down stretches, I had pins and needles in my hands. I did heavier weights today than I'd done before (which I'm sure most of you would think of as pathetic starter weights). Not a gentle pleasant tingle, but a harsh slightly painful one. It only lasted a minute or two, and then it was gone.

    Is this a normal result of working out? Or is it something I should worry about?

    Advice much appreciated.

    Thank you.


    No biggy. You nerves are literally getting larger. It's called neurological adaptation.

    Your nervous system as been running on low voltage and the nerves are, literally, getting larger to fire at higher current level to support the exercise.

    Neat, huh?


    I always sorta figured that your pumped up muscles are putting a little pressure on your nerves. Giving them a little "hello" squeeze.
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    Mar 20, 2009 6:31 AM GMT
    Yep. Sometimes, as bursa expand....it can feel pretty strange. E.g., in your elbow, or thumb, are pretty common if your arms are growing fast.
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    Mar 20, 2009 10:28 AM GMT
    sounds like thoracic outlet syndrome to me. its caused by compression of the nerves that supply your arms by tight muscles; usually from tight pectorals and scalenes (stringy muscles in the front of your neck). its quite common and all you need to do is target the tight muscles through stretching out your pectorals and scalenes post work out, or see a chiro/PT etc to help
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    Mar 20, 2009 11:39 AM GMT
    Usually paratheisas (numbness) involving only the hands is caused by nerve compression in the wrist area. Carpal tunnel syndrome is caused by the median nerve being compressed in the wrist. What probably is happening is that you flexing and extending the wrists much more than your accustomed too and compressing a nerve. This is a very common problem in bicycle riders because their wrists are so extended back while holding the handlebars. This happens to me on occasion and the numbness gets so bad I have to get of the bike
    If the parathesias go up the arm then compression of the radial and ulnar nerves at the elbows is a possibility. The brachial plexus in the thoracic outlet in the shoulder area can also be involved. Compression of spinal nerves exiting the vetebra can also occur (usually caused by a disk).
    Without seeing a physician the exact area of compression can not be determined. And even for a specialist like a neurologist this can be a daunting task to find out where the problem is . If the problem gets worse or does not resolve you need to see a physician.
    If you really want to be confused there are 49 conditions that cause hand numbness. Here is a link to the article appearing in Wrong Diagnosis Com

    http://www.wrongdiagnosis.com/sym/hand_paresthesia.htm
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    Mar 20, 2009 1:49 PM GMT
    Thanks guys. Reassuring to know it's not an early warning for a stroke.

    Well, I hope I'll look like you lot sometime soon. :-)
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    Mar 22, 2009 5:33 PM GMT
    Exactly what kneedraggen said.

    You know the tingling that extends through your fingers when you hit your "funny bone"? That's because you're actually smacking and temporarily compressing your ulnar nerve. Similarly after a hard workout you've most likely compressed nerves in the brachial plexus or somewhere along the length of your arm causing a similar sensation.
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    Apr 04, 2009 6:27 PM GMT
    skifan08 saidExactly what kneedraggen said.

    You know the tingling that extends through your fingers when you hit your "funny bone"? That's because you're actually smacking and temporarily compressing your ulnar nerve. Similarly after a hard workout you've most likely compressed nerves in the brachial plexus or somewhere along the length of your arm causing a similar sensation.


    Yep. Sometimes, if I get real pumped up through my back, I can feel it in my hands (thumbs). I've dealt with the nerve compression thing several times over the years.
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    Apr 04, 2009 10:13 PM GMT
    Alternatively, you might want to consider taking a B complex - like a B75 complex. B12 helps with your nerve health - I used to get tingling in my legs all the time, and as soon as I started the B complex it stopped completely. A friend of mine is actually deficient and her fingers tingle constantly while working out - she was diagnosed thru a blood test, and was put on prescription strength B12 supplements and no longer has the 'problem'. Both she and I are vegetarians, so our natural source of B12 is rather limited - milk and eggs (usually B12 comes from meat) so for me, the supplement helps a lot - and for her, she needs the prescription dosage.

    Again, not everyone may experience this - but it's food for thought.
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    Apr 04, 2009 11:33 PM GMT
    trab saidAlternatively, you might want to consider taking a B complex - like a B75 complex. B12 helps with your nerve health - I used to get tingling in my legs all the time, and as soon as I started the B complex it stopped completely. A friend of mine is actually deficient and her fingers tingle constantly while working out - she was diagnosed thru a blood test, and was put on prescription strength B12 supplements and no longer has the 'problem'. Both she and I are vegetarians, so our natural source of B12 is rather limited - milk and eggs (usually B12 comes from meat) so for me, the supplement helps a lot - and for her, she needs the prescription dosage.

    Again, not everyone may experience this - but it's food for thought.


    Deficiency of several B vitamins may cause nerve damage

    B1 deficiency (Beri Beri) occurs in individuals on starvation diets. Vegans do not have this problem since B1 is found in vegetables and grains

    B6 deficiency occurs in starvation diets

    B12 deficiency can occurs in vegans as mentioned by trab
    B12 deficiency can also occur in some individuals who are unable to absorb B12. They are treated with monthly B12 shots. The disease is called pernicious anemia

    Although these are causes of tingling, they would not be at the top of my list as the cause of your problem. However anything is possible and needs to be considered.