Immus comment: what do you think?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 11, 2007 12:25 AM GMT
    Curous what guys on here think about the Immust comment, the reaction (or overreaction) to it, and women's sports in general? I have never in my life listened to Immus. I only know him from the old days when Howard Stern would bash him. I have to admit when I read his comments in the paper I laughed. I think if the only thing people in this country have to complain about are words, then we have it pretty darn good. If you want to experience true discrimination, go to Darfur. As far as women's sports--I am proud that America has a great culture and accpetance of female sports. Soccer, which is supposedly the biggest sport in the world, is dominated in the women's side by American players, this is because America expects their daughters to play sports as much as their sons. Cool. But you cannot compare women's sports with men's, or even boy's. I was watching a boys high school basketball game on TV the other week, then switched to watch the women's NCAA games--the difference was night and day. The women looked like they were playing in slow motion compared to even boys. Does this mean female athletes are nappy haired hos? NO, but the truth is female athletics is only tolerated to appease PC college campuses. The big money is brought in by the men's teams. And I reiterate: if the only thing we can complain about in this country are words and flag displays, then we have NOTHING to complain about.
  • hotversguy

    Posts: 155

    Apr 11, 2007 1:42 AM GMT
    Michael Richards, Don Imus, who will be number 3? It makes me wonder just how much more pervasive racism is than we think? Generally for anything like that to actually get out in the media means that's it's starting to be taken for granted.

    Maybe it's anti-PC backlash.

    I know I hear a lot more "sideways" racism than I used to. For example "oh, you're opening a restaurant in that part of Brooklyn? That's a tough (pause) demographic, no?" (Crown Hts for those in the know).
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    Apr 11, 2007 2:30 AM GMT
    I laughed as well, but it was because it was so radom. The racism aspect wasn't as bad as I thought it would be, though it was clear that he was talking about black people. Didn't seem to me like a big deal, however I'm not black nor am I part of the black community so I have no idea how the connotation would be offensive. Also in response to the previous post saying that you need to go to Darfur to experience real racism was in pretty bad taste, though I might just be reading it wrong.
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    Apr 11, 2007 3:23 PM GMT
    I agree with what you started in this "forum"...
    All this media coverage (or hype)...
    But where was the media coverage and days of front page conjecture when bigoted comments were made by Andrew Young/Walmart and Michael Ray Richardson/Albany Patroons? There seems to have been barely a mention on News Web Pages, Nightly News, Blogs...
    One ultimately stepped down from his post, the other was not re-signed to a contract and still hasn't shut-up.
    My question would be, why did they NOT earn the media blitz that Imus, Mel Gibson and Michael Richards were thrust in to during the same months? Or is finger pointing only reserved when a "white male" makes asinine comments (while drunk and or angry) or does the media use it to fuel racism fervor, generate more press and ratings and $$$$?
    I don't by any means condone the language regardless, but I provide this as food for thought...
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    Apr 11, 2007 5:17 PM GMT
    Is it hype ?

    Sorry to say this but ..
    IS it someone or some group over Reacting

    Why is it ok ? for a black person to call
    a white person a CRACKER ?

    Why is it ok for a str8 man to call a gay man a fag ?

    If you give it attetion
    your just makeing it worse




  • RSportsguy

    Posts: 1925

    Apr 11, 2007 8:12 PM GMT
    I just think it was incredibly stupid and unprofessional. How many more incidents of this type will it take for people to realize that this will no longer be tolerated by the mainstream public? OK, you can say that people are overreacting, maybe they are, but why give them anything to overreact about? I do not listen to Imus nor do I care if he is fired from CBS over this or not because I will not listen to him in the future either.
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    Apr 11, 2007 8:46 PM GMT
    Imus is considered a "shock jock" and has been around a long, long time according to Al Roker who said he remembers him from the 70s.

    I just think it's funny that Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson suddenly appear on all the talk shows everytime this kind of thing happens - like they're conjured up whenever someone says something racist.

    Imus made a dumb mistake, he shouldn't have said it - but making such a big deal over all this just gives his remarks more power.
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    Apr 11, 2007 9:08 PM GMT
    I never watch Imus, not my kind of guy. The words he used are a part of his world of discourse. Most people I know would never speak like this because the words wouldn't occur to them. Imus reflects a coarseness in our society and obviously a bigotry. I don't care if he's tossed of the air or not. I wish CBS and NBC would have found him too distaseful to hire in the first place.
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    Apr 11, 2007 11:21 PM GMT
    Getting to the topic of white male saying something racist and how that gets the most coverage a few posts up, i think its really funny that white males should feel disenfranchised and targeted. I don't think it was about who earns what type of media coverage, its that the mass population are more or less ok with gay bashing so making a big deal about wont help anyones ratings.
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    Apr 11, 2007 11:51 PM GMT
    Don't forget Jesse Jackson once called New York City "hymie town" and he's still around shaking down businesses for money. There seems to be a double standard.
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    Apr 12, 2007 1:14 AM GMT
    I used to listen to Imus years ago. The program was mildly entertaining, with all sorts of skits and horseplay. I don't remember any controversial comments back then, but that was way back then.... :-)

    I think his comments were stupid. Stupid because he should have realized that they would cause the reaction they did (as opposed to being just merely crude and funny). And stupid because they came out racist, and he claims the he meant something different...that the players were fashioning themselves to look like tough guys/hoods. If he meant that, he should have said something like "they look like hoods from "The Sopranos"...and not what he said.

    So I do believe they came out racist, because they were racist.

    But...that said...I agree with the previous posts that there has been a gross overreaction to this. And, yes, I remember Jesse Jackson making that comment, and, yes, he got away with it, at least in terms of it fading away.

    In terms of affronts to humanity, this one doesn't rate the attention that it is getting.

    John
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    Apr 12, 2007 1:46 AM GMT
    "he should have said something like "they look like hoods from "The Sopranos"..."

    Well then as an Italian-American I would have had to take offense to that and demand an appology and that he be fired. Just kidding of course. I'm not that fragile.
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    Apr 12, 2007 3:04 AM GMT
    He's a radio/TV talk guy. His job is to say stuff. That's different than some like, say. a mechanic. If a mechanic does something stupid and unprofessional to your car, you fire him. If a talking head does something stupid and unprofessional to your ears, you fire him too. Nither of them gets thrown in jail, pays a fine, or anything else. But it's perfectly legit for people to demand that someone who does something really unprofessional be fired.
  • Paradigm_Shif...

    Posts: 251

    Apr 12, 2007 3:21 AM GMT
    As an African-American I found Imus's remarks rather offensive. Its debatable if people are over reacting to what he said, but I do think it is important that there is some public outcry when public figures make such derogatory comments to ANY minority. If people don’t stand up and speak out when someone makes such offensive remarks, then people with bigoted ideas will feel its socially acceptable to spout any hateful idea they may hold.

    Addressing the comments about Jessie Jackson and Al Sharpton, In all honesty I hate the fact that they are supposed to be the “Spokesmen for all black people” or something. I feel like a lot of what they say is just rhetoric and I agree that they have made some statements in bad taste as well. At the same time, I do feel like they serve an important purpose. They provide some accountability to public figures and they act as watchdogs against those who may not practice what they preach, or in this case those who just preach lol.

    As far as Americans not having anything to complain about, I also agree that we do have it pretty great in this country. In many places throughout the world there is true hate being preached and people performing acts of violence against each other, day in and day out. In comparison our problems may seem frivolous. But lets not forget. The US still has hate crimes (72 year old gay man murdered in Detroit this year). The US still has racism ( Imus, Mel Gibson, Michael Richards, and those are just the ones who got caught…). The US still has homophobia (spend a day in pretty much any high school in this nation…)

    As Martin Luther King said “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere”. This whole media blitz may seem like a bit much for just a few words, and there are probably all kinds of less than altruistic motives for it (Ratings, $$$$$, Attention). But in my opinion, we shouldn’t be concerned if it’s a little over done. My concern is when there is NO outcry, NO one to stand up and NO one preaching a message of peace. Simply look at Germany in the 1930s to see what happens when good people are silent.
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Apr 12, 2007 8:07 AM GMT
    I agree with u for the most part and socal hit the nail on the head. The more attention we give this the more it ends up fueling racism. Something we all do not need...
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Apr 12, 2007 8:08 AM GMT
    sorry correction Norcal.
  • UTB1

    Posts: 39

    Apr 12, 2007 3:39 PM GMT
    Imus was obviously stupid - but in one sense he is paid to be. I would give credence to Jesse and Al if their motives were pure. However, they have both been shaking down big companies for years - making threats regarding racism or alternatively pushing it under the rug if the big company writes a big check to Jesse's Rainbow Coalition.

    Ever wonder how a dude who is a preacher has the money to fly all over the place and has no real means of employment? Remember, Imus works for both CBS and GE - deep pockets.

    Why have no other black leaders -true leaders come out on these and other "racism" issues. I hate racism, but I have to look at the big picture as well, and I just don't see Jesse and Al as being ones who can cast stones. They are in some ways hypocritical because their motives are not about racism - that is just the means to the end - their motives are all about money. Follow the money and you will soon see the true motivation behind their activities.
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    Apr 12, 2007 5:01 PM GMT
    Jesse Jackson got his start as a cocaine pusher on the streets of Chicago. When he made millions, he decided to "give back" to the community by using his riches to open community centers, etc. The fools in his hood worshipped him like he was a god. It's the same as with Yassir Arrafat or any other thug who forced his way into power. Jesse really is a repugnant human being, if you can call him that.
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    Apr 13, 2007 3:03 PM GMT
    I think peterstrong, cutejockmasc and
    NNJfitandbi are all correct. That's because all these things are true: (a) Imus' comments WERE racist (and sexist, and thoughtless, and cruel); (b) Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton ARE players taking advantage of the situation and over-hyping the meaning/implication/importance of Imus' comments and stimulating what I feel is a gross overreaction to what actually was said; and (c) radio commentators, particularly, shock-jocks SHOULD be held accountable for their purposeful misstatements.

    Regarding (c), I am darn sure Imus knew that his comments would sting, and the fact that these comments were directed to kids really makes them vile. Thanks, Peter, for your comments on professors. We do try. And I am sure you are correct...those women are at a major university, renowed for its academic standards. To rale against those kids because of their hair style as if they were thugs on the street is really galling.

    However, this whole thing is being overplayed...and there is too much overreaction.

    John
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    Apr 13, 2007 4:00 PM GMT
    The New York Times and the Chicago Tribune on Wednesday had HUGE front page photos of the black women on the Rutgers team. The photo gave the impression the women were waiting to be carted off to Auschwitz. It's weird how the Lefties give more credence to what someone says over what someone does. In most parts of western europe, for example, it's illegal to even deny the Holocaust happened, yet these same people turned a blind eye to Bonsia until Bill Clinton demanded intervention.
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    Apr 13, 2007 5:28 PM GMT
    It is a big Double Standard. Imus is a shock jock. But this is no worse than if you turn over to BET to watch an ass shaking rap video. And ever other word out of the mouth is "ho" or "bitch".
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    Apr 13, 2007 7:31 PM GMT
    I don't see the connection of rap video "speak" to what Imus said. I'm Italian, and when I am joking around with my Italian friends, we may call each other "wops". That's analagous to rap videos in which a black performer is referring to his entourage of women as "ho's".

    I'm not saying I like to hear the language of violence and the degeneration of English in rap videos. But what is said in those is a group of individuals taking control of terms used to denigrate themselves by other people.

    We've done the same thing to the word "gay" and now "queer."

    Having a gay friend joke around and refer to me as "you queer" is not offensive. Hearing a radio host or shock jock refer to gay people as "those queers" or any other group with some analagous term is offensive. That's what Imus did.

    However, I still think this whole thing is getting blown out of proportion...and not because, sigh, it's a left wing plot. As Peter says...it allc comes down to capitalism. Imus was thrown out because the advertisers were afraid that their goods would not sell...
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    Apr 13, 2007 9:17 PM GMT
    I think people are blowing the "double standard" thing way out of proportion. And its fantastic that people are attacking Jackson and Sharpton, but I'm not understanding the relevance in respect to the main point. I thought we were discussing the validity of how the netorks are handeling Imus. So...back to the topic, there is always a possibility that someone didn't like him so they just waited to find some reason to get rid of him. It happens all the time.
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    Apr 14, 2007 12:22 AM GMT
    I really could care less what was said.
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    Apr 14, 2007 1:17 AM GMT
    Here's my take on it: Imus is offensive and this isn't the first time. Likely, he'll go work for XM and go cash in, just like Howard. At any rate, and as someone who spent 11 years in commercial broadcasting, I think Imus was imitating culture. Several sub-cultures are VERY self-deprecating. That have no respect for themselves. That certainly doesn't invoke it from others. I have certain groups of people that have NEVER pulled a gun on me; others that have; perhaps a coincidence, and perhaps not. I've never had loud booming country music wake me up, but, have had loud booming hip up, played by a sub-culture wake me up repeatedly in the middle of the night. That general lack of respect for others (both themselves and others) by the subcultures not only serves to alienate main stream culture (making them prejudice, even if they don't choose to be), but also makes people across the board very self-centered, self-indulgent and disrespectful. Honestly, it's easy to be up scale. The best leadership is by example. Folks don't put there weights away at the gym; they walk in front of me at the gym; they blast their stereos; they throw their trash in the parking lot. I refuse to lower my standards to those people, and try to lead by example. That DOESN'T mean I need to be all accepting. That does mean I follow the "golden rule." There's lots of bad parenting, across the board. Folks with low esteem are attracted to gangs; blast their stereos, run pictureless; make lewd remarks. I.e., Imus is a reflection of popular culture. The far right is using it as an opportunity to make noise. Is Imus a jerk? I think so. Should he be fired? I think he shouldn't have been dumped years ago, along with Howard as well, but, both have very good ratings. Why? Well, they reflect what many people are truely thinking but don't say because of political correctness. Until that underlying thought process gets fixed; parenting gets better; religious influence is set aside; literacy is higher, these issues will remain. It's very difficult to not become resentful of certain subcultures because of the way they treat themselves, and others. Again, it all gets down to good parenting and getting religion out of the picture.