Your thoughts on Xenadrine or Hydroxycut pills

  • misterduck

    Posts: 32

    Mar 24, 2009 4:17 PM GMT
    I know this is a stupidish question, but I was wondering if anyone has tried those stupid Xenadrine or Hydroxycut pills to loose weight? I watched a documentary over the weekend called "Bigger, Faster, Stronger" and they talked to one of these fitness models that was on steroids and showed how they "enhanced" these advertisements so people look better/perfect. Soooo...it got me to wonderin' about those diet pills and if they actually work.

    I purchased some Xenadrine early last year and used it on and off but it didn't seem to do anything. Mostly I didn't really give it a chance. I ran across the bottle this morning in my linen clothes and I thought Hmmmmm...maybe I should give this a try again. First I took one of the pills then looked at the back and it said EXPIRES 9/08 so I thought - hmmmm..what a waste of money. Wonder if I still took it, if it would work...or kill me, stroke me out, do something bad! icon_smile.gif

    Anyway...it did get me to thinking if anyone out there has used either of these "diet supplements" and saw any result other than loosing like 2 or 3 lbs of water weight! I know it's kinda cheatin' but hey...any little thing that can help me those that stubborn last 5/8 lbs!
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    Mar 24, 2009 5:20 PM GMT
    misterduck saidI know this is a stupidish question, but I was wondering if anyone has tried those stupid Xenadrine or Hydroxycut pills to loose weight? I watched a documentary over the weekend called "Bigger, Faster, Stronger" and they talked to one of these fitness models that was on steroids and showed how they "enhanced" these advertisements so people look better/perfect. Soooo...it got me to wonderin' about those diet pills and if they actually work.

    I purchased some Xenadrine early last year and used it on and off but it didn't seem to do anything. Mostly I didn't really give it a chance. I ran across the bottle this morning in my linen clothes and I thought Hmmmmm...maybe I should give this a try again. First I took one of the pills then looked at the back and it said EXPIRES 9/08 so I thought - hmmmm..what a waste of money. Wonder if I still took it, if it would work...or kill me, stroke me out, do something bad! icon_smile.gif

    Anyway...it did get me to thinking if anyone out there has used either of these "diet supplements" and saw any result other than loosing like 2 or 3 lbs of water weight! I know it's kinda cheatin' but hey...any little thing that can help me those that stubborn last 5/8 lbs!


    Hmmm doesn't creatine assist with the retention of water? So if you are taking creatine that makes the muscles fuller by retaining water and at the same time you are taking xenadrine that makes you lose water... well aren't you sort of back to square one??????

    Now where was I going with this again???? oh well......
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    Mar 24, 2009 5:42 PM GMT
    Diuretics that make you shed excess water weight are really only good for a short term result. Some bodybuilders take them before a contest to look as shredded as possible, but if you use them for too long it's going to be rough on the kidneys.

    Fat burners typically work by using stimulants that raise your resting heart rate so you burn more fat throughout the day. In theory they work, and I know people that swear by them, but if you have any kind of heart problems or high blood pressure they are potentially dangerous. From what I've read, they really work best in combo with a proper diet and exercise program. So it's not like they're a magic pill like some people seem to think, but they could give you the extra push to drop a couple extra pounds. And most that I know of are only meant to be used in cycles. Main thing is be careful!
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    Mar 24, 2009 5:51 PM GMT
    misterduck saidI know this is a stupidish question, but I was wondering if anyone has tried those stupid Xenadrine or Hydroxycut pills to loose weight? I watched a documentary over the weekend called "Bigger, Faster, Stronger" and they talked to one of these fitness models that was on steroids and showed how they "enhanced" these advertisements so people look better/perfect. Soooo...it got me to wonderin' about those diet pills and if they actually work.

    I purchased some Xenadrine early last year and used it on and off but it didn't seem to do anything. Mostly I didn't really give it a chance. I ran across the bottle this morning in my linen clothes and I thought Hmmmmm...maybe I should give this a try again. First I took one of the pills then looked at the back and it said EXPIRES 9/08 so I thought - hmmmm..what a waste of money. Wonder if I still took it, if it would work...or kill me, stroke me out, do something bad! icon_smile.gif

    Anyway...it did get me to thinking if anyone out there has used either of these "diet supplements" and saw any result other than loosing like 2 or 3 lbs of water weight! I know it's kinda cheatin' but hey...any little thing that can help me those that stubborn last 5/8 lbs!


    Green tea, and coffee, work as well, or better, and are a lot cheaper. Save your money for some real food.
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    Mar 24, 2009 7:08 PM GMT
    your paying for an expensive piss dye.
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    Mar 24, 2009 7:14 PM GMT
    "Fat burners typically work by using stimulants that raise your resting heart rate so you burn more fat throughout the day. In theory they work, and I know people that swear by them, but if you have any kind of heart problems or high blood pressure they are potentially dangerous."

    hypothetically, wouldn't diet energy drinks do the same thing? i drink a LOT of diet rockstar when i'm at school, and i've always told myself it boosts my metabolism...
  • buzzman182004

    Posts: 76

    Mar 24, 2009 7:17 PM GMT
    Like someone said, if it's used in conjunction with diet and exercise they work well, or at least the hydroxycut in my experience. I used hydroxycut a while ago and when I exercised and ate right I lost a lot of weight (appr. 45 lbs. in a roughly 8 month period).icon_biggrin.gif
  • zakariahzol

    Posts: 2241

    Mar 24, 2009 8:48 PM GMT
    Hydroxycut make my eyes dry. Anyone have the same problem?
  • OutOfEden

    Posts: 100

    Mar 24, 2009 8:48 PM GMT
    I used Hydroxycut for about three months a few years back. I don't think it did much except gave me the extra energy to hit the gym after a full day of work, which made a big difference in my body. Ultimately I stopped because I realized I had too much of it in my system and it was keeping me up at night. Even the recommended dosage (which is at least 2x too high) recommends 2 weeks on and 1 week off, to let your body clear it. If you have a lot of body fat where the fat-soluble parts of these products can be stored you should be even more cautious as your body may receive extra stimulation during exercise when that fat is broken down. Lastly, many opponents point to potential for kidney damage from sustained use, you should read up on that risk as well.
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    Mar 24, 2009 8:52 PM GMT
    its garbage. dont waste your money.
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    Mar 24, 2009 8:59 PM GMT
    chuckystud saidGreen tea, and coffee, work as well, or better, and are a lot cheaper. Save your money for some real food.


    Exactly! Not to mention that you don't really know what's in these pills. All of these nutritional supplements, meal replacements, etc. are unregulated. Not that regulation is necessarily a good thing always, but when it comes to food, medicine, and supplements, I'd rather know that there's solid science backing a product, not just snake oil claims. Your liver and kidneys have to work very hard to process all this crap.

    I'd suggest Yerba Mate as well. Coffee is pretty bad for you for a number of reasons. It acidifies the body worse than just about anything else. Yerba Mate, in my experience, gives me a long-lasting, no-crash boost of energy without any of the jitters or sluggishness after the coffee buzz wears off.
  • dionysus

    Posts: 420

    Mar 24, 2009 9:01 PM GMT
    enjoy your early death. hope it was worth six pack that didn't happen without the aid of diet and exercise. yea. thats right. check the fine print.

    results not typical. results achieved in conjunction with diet and exercise.


    i got an easier alternative. go to starbucks. buy a coffee. support your local hippy-infected coffee bar and buy a coffee.

    you get my drift? no? then find a bridge.
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    Mar 25, 2009 5:27 AM GMT
    When I train for a national level contest, I do three-a-days for 18 weeks. I often diet for 24 weeks. (Europa 2007). Morning HIIT, afternoon workouts, evening HIIT, and..sometimes, and evening walk. Along with 10 meals per day.

    As you can imagine, my medical numbers, are out of bounds, in a good way. (Actually, not that far out of bounds..sometimes, heart beat, sodium, and the like are to low...the rest, are low. E.g cholesterol total 130.)

    Sports science is a craft (well, science, too). Like aspirin, or food, or even some pot...or alcohol, a little can be good, but, to much can kick your behind. There's a fine line between optimization, and harmful. Each person has to decide where there line is. Your have to listen to your body, and mind.

    As you mature, you realize how little you truly known, but, also, you draw upon your experiences, research, and the experiences of others. E.g. beating off DOES NOT make one blind.

    By far, and ABOVE, obesity is the pandemic that kills. PERIOD.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 25, 2009 5:29 AM GMT
    If I use anything I typically use the green tea extract. Mostly for the energy but it also helps burn fat
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    Mar 25, 2009 5:37 AM GMT
    ActiveAndFit saidIf I use anything I typically use the green tea extract. Mostly for the energy but it also helps burn fat


    Green tea is awesome. The roommate and I always keep it around.
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    Mar 25, 2009 5:54 AM GMT
    poison.

  • Mar 25, 2009 5:56 AM GMT
    I tried Hydroxycut cause I need to lose weight... I just felt really strange and kind of weird in a high kind of way... totally hated it... just need to do it in hte old fashioned way... I gave them away...
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    Mar 25, 2009 9:29 PM GMT
    They make you jittery, and help you lose water weight. Your body needs water, it's made up of mostly water. Everyone freaks out when they think their losing muscle mass for asthetic reasons, but you should be freaking out harder if you're using massive extra amounts of water.

    The reason why these supplements are so popular is because America's a society built on instant gratification. Everyone wants results, but doesn't want to work for them.

    The disclaimer is that the pills will work as long as you follow a healthy diet, and exercise regimen, but a healthy diet and exercise regimen will work on their own without putting your health at risk.
  • gwuinsf

    Posts: 525

    Mar 25, 2009 10:24 PM GMT
    Hydroxycut had a product called Hydroxycut Extreme or something like that. I see it's not on their website anymore. It had a red dye in it that turned my poop bright red which was extremely frightening until I connected the two.

    I guess that's why they don't make it anymore.

    Anyway, I've tried a bunch of them in the past, and I don't think they do anything except make you pee a lot and jittery. Diet and exercise, like they say.
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    Mar 29, 2009 3:15 AM GMT
    I can't agree with using drugs to lose weight unless it is truly severe. I think the importance of the weight we carry on our bodies is a reflection of lifestyle and more importantly self-image. Yeah I am kind of flabby, but that is my weight to lose or gain or stabilize.
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    Mar 29, 2009 3:24 AM GMT
    muchmorethanmuscle saidSubstitute coffee for caffeine pills. One pill equates to one cup of coffee. I'm not sure if caffeine alone acidifies the body but if anyone knows and can site a reference by all means please chime in.


    Here are a few food chars that might be of interest:

    http://www.essense-of-life.com/moreinfo/foodcharts.htm
    http://www.angelfire.com/az/sthurston/acid_alkaline_foods_list.html

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    May 05, 2009 3:05 PM GMT
    FDA to dieters: Don't use supplement Hydroxycut
    Important Information Regarding The Recent FDA Consumer Advisory
    http://www.hydroxycutinformation.com/

    By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, Associated Press Writer Ricardo Alonso-zaldivar, Associated Press Writer – Sat May 2, 10:05 am ET

    WASHINGTON – Government health officials warned dieters and body builders Friday to immediately stop using Hydroxycut, a widely sold supplement linked to cases of serious liver damage and at least one death.

    The Food and Drug Administration said the company that makes the dietary supplement has agreed to recall 14 Hydroxycut products. Available in grocery stores and pharmacies, Hydroxycut is advertised as made from natural ingredients. At least 9 million packages were sold last year, the FDA said.

    Dr. Linda Katz of the FDA's food and nutrition division said the agency has received 23 reports of liver problems, including the death of a 19-year-old boy living in the Southwest. The teenager died in 2007, and the death was reported to the FDA this March.

    Other patients experienced symptoms ranging from jaundice, or yellowing of the skin, to liver failure. One received a transplant and another was placed on a list to await a new liver. The patients were otherwise healthy and their symptoms began after they started using Hydroxycut, regulators said.

    Iovate Health Sciences, which makes the diet pills, said in a statement that the 2007 death of the teenager was not caused by Hydroxycut. The statement gave no details.

    "The number of adverse event reports described by the FDA in its advisory is small relative to the many millions of people who have used Hydroxycut products over the past seven years," said the company statement. "Iovate's own assessment of the potential risk associated with the use of these products differs from that expressed by the FDA."

    On its Web site, the company said it agreed to the recall out of "an abundance of caution." Iovate is based in Canada, with U.S. offices near Buffalo, N.Y. Consumers can get a refund by returning the pills to the store that sold them, the company said.

    Dietary supplements aren't as tightly regulated by the government as medications. Manufacturers don't need to prove to the FDA that their products are safe and effective before they can sell them to consumers.

    But regulators monitor aftermarket reports for signs of trouble, and in recent years companies have been put under stricter requirements to alert the FDA when they learn of problems. In 2004, the government banned ephedra, an ingredient in many supplements, linked to heart attacks and strokes.

    Katz said it has taken so long to get a handle on the Hydroxycut problem because the cases of liver damage were rare and the FDA has no authority to review supplements before they're marketed. "Part of the problem is that the FDA looks at dietary supplements from a post-market perspective, and an isolated incident is often difficult to follow," she said.

    The FDA relies on voluntary reports to detect such problems, and many cases are never reported, officials acknowledge.

    Health officials said they have been unable to determine which Hydroxycut ingredients are potentially toxic, partially because the formulation has changed several times.

    Public health researcher Ano Lobb, who has studied Hydroxycut and other dietary supplements for Consumer Reports, said the problem may be an ingredient called hydroxycitric acid. Derived from a tropical fruit, it's been linked to liver problems in at least one medical journal study. Lobb said it's likely that other supplements containing the same ingredient remain on the market.

    "You really have to be careful about dietary supplements, especially weight-loss pills," said Lobb. "People believe that the FDA has verified that these products are at least safe and effective, and that's really not the case. When you see fantastic claims — that's generally what they are."
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 05, 2009 3:16 PM GMT
    Love em!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 05, 2009 3:24 PM GMT
    Chizzad saidLove em!


    icon_eek.gif i thought they were killing people....icon_eek.gif
  • DIAKADI_SF

    Posts: 21

    May 05, 2009 3:31 PM GMT
    They do not work. The only thing that works is a proper balanced nutritional lifestyle. There are absolutely no quick fixes for weight loss. It should be something you do everyday - no fad diets, no diet pills. It's your health - why take something that causes your BP to rise and dehydrate you?