Shakespeare - Would You?

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    Mar 28, 2009 5:18 PM GMT
    Shakespeare's picture has recently been touched up - and it turns out everyone's favourite bisexual bard was a bit of a hottie.

    Portraits-of-Shakespeare-001.jpg

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/culture/2009/mar/28/william-shakespeare-cobbe-portrait-restoration

    That beard is total gay-chic. icon_wink.gif

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    Mar 28, 2009 5:26 PM GMT
    Yes, he certainly looks sexier.

    And, of course, talent can be a powerful aphrodisiac.

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    Mar 28, 2009 5:36 PM GMT
    Damn! We all know what "pound of flesh" inspired the Merchant of Venice.
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    Mar 28, 2009 7:14 PM GMT
    ^ LOL, yeah, but does he have visible abs?

    Nice ruff.
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    Mar 28, 2009 7:25 PM GMT
    Trouble is that he was probably one of them intellectual snobs. That might have caused your revels to end before they really got started.
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    Mar 28, 2009 7:28 PM GMT
    ^ hahaha, you'd certainly have difficulty winning an argument with him. Lost for words? Never.
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    Mar 28, 2009 7:30 PM GMT
    Am I looking at it wrong, or does he have a wonky eye?
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    Mar 28, 2009 7:36 PM GMT
    ^ Omg. It looks like he can move the right one independently.

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    Mar 28, 2009 7:45 PM GMT
    SONNET 20...one of the bard's gayest

    A woman's face with Nature's own hand painted
    Hast thou, the master-mistress of my passion;
    A woman's gentle heart, but not acquainted
    With shifting change, as is false women's fashion;
    An eye more bright than theirs, less false in rolling,
    Gilding the object whereupon it gazeth;
    A man in hue, all 'hues' in his controlling,
    Much steals men's eyes and women's souls amazeth. .
    And for a woman wert thou first created;
    Till Nature, as she wrought thee, fell a-doting,
    And by addition me of thee defeated,
    By adding one thing to my purpose nothing.
    But since she prick'd thee out for women's pleasure,
    Mine be thy love and thy love's use their treasure.

    Modern Paraphrase:
    A woman's face, colored by Nature's own hand
    Have you, the master/mistress of my desire;
    You have a woman's gentle heart, but you are not prone
    To fickle change, as is the way with women;
    You have eyes brighter than their eyes, and more sincere,
    Lighting up the very object that they look upon;
    You are a man in shape and form, and all men are in your control,
    You catch the attention of men and amaze women's souls [hearts].
    You were originally intended to be a woman;
    Until Nature, made a mistake in making you,
    And by adding one extra thing [Nature] defeated me,
    By adding one thing she has prevented me from fully having you,
    But since Nature equipped you for women's pleasure,
    Let your body be their treasure, and let me have your love.


    ANALYSIS

    Sonnet 20 has caused much debate. Some scholars believe that this is a clear admission of Shakespeare's homosexuality. Despite the fact that male friendships in the Renaissance were openly affectionate, the powerful emotions the poet displays here are indicative of a deep and sensual love. The poet's lover is 'the master-mistress of [his] passion'. He has the grace and features of a woman but is devoid of the guile and pretense that comes with female lovers; those wily women with eyes 'false in rolling', who change their moods and affections like chameleons. Lines 9-14 are of particular interest to critics on both sides of the homosexual debate. Some argue these lines show that, despite his love for the young man, the poet does not want to 'have' him physically. The poet proclaims that he is content to let women enjoy the 'manly gifts' that God has given his friend. He is satisfied to love the young man in a spiritual way. But others contend that Shakespeare had to include this disclaimer, due to the homophobia of the time. "The meaning is conveyed not just by what is said but by the tone. The argument may serve to clear Shakespeare of the charge of a serious offense..." (Spender, 99). Even if the poet is, in this sonnet, refraining from physical relations with the young man, the thought of such relations appears to consume and please his imagination, and "from what we soon learn about the friend, with his 'sensual fault' and lasciviousness, it seems unlikely that, to him, such a relationship would be unthinkable" (Spender, 99). Moreover, in light of later sonnets such as 56 and 57, where the poet, in essence, tells us that his friend is cheating on him, it becomes harder and harder to conclude that the "cheating" is merely of a emotional, and not physical, nature.

    Mabillard, Amanda. An Analysis of Shakespeare's Sonnet 20. Shakespeare Online. 2000. http://www.shakespeare-online.com/sonnets/20detail.html

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    Mar 28, 2009 7:52 PM GMT
    Beaux saidAm I looking at it wrong, or does he have a wonky eye?


    Remember that love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind.

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    Mar 28, 2009 7:54 PM GMT
    theatrengym said
    Beaux saidAm I looking at it wrong, or does he have a wonky eye?


    Remember that love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind.

    Or he has his eyes on two guys at the same time....the elizabethean slut
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    Mar 28, 2009 8:06 PM GMT
    Caslon9000 said
    theatrengym said
    Beaux saidAm I looking at it wrong, or does he have a wonky eye?


    Remember that love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind.

    Or he has his eyes on two guys at the same time....the elizabethean slut


    Sounds like perhaps he had some personal knowledge that led him to have one of his male characters say:

    "Our passions are more giddy and unfirm,
    More longing, wavering, sooner lost and worn
    Than women's are.
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    Mar 28, 2009 8:18 PM GMT
    Lost_And_Found saidShakespeare's picture has recently been touched up - and it turns out everyone's favourite bisexual bard ...



    Bi? I'm convinced he more appropriately belongs in the "gay" category.
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    Mar 28, 2009 8:38 PM GMT
    warrior_poet63 said
    Lost_And_Found saidShakespeare's picture has recently been touched up - and it turns out everyone's favourite bisexual bard ...



    Bi? I'm convinced he more appropriately belongs in the "gay" category.


    Well, he was married and he had kids so he must have been at least a little bit bi. Of course, there's no absolute proof that the kids' father was really Shakespeare. And she was pregnant when they got married.

    She was eight years older — it's been said that it was common in that time for women to marry younger men — and it's certainly been surmised that there wasn't much passion between them since they lived apart from most of their marriage, with Bill in London and Anne in Stratford.

    But we'll never really know.
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    Mar 28, 2009 9:30 PM GMT
    His eyebrows seem to be plucked. Perhaps he was just metrosexual?
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    Mar 28, 2009 9:38 PM GMT
    Lost_And_Found saidHis eyebrows seem to be plucked. Perhaps he was just metrosexual?


    Very like, very like, as someone would say.
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    Mar 29, 2009 8:17 PM GMT
    theatrengym said
    Lost_And_Found saidHis eyebrows seem to be plucked. Perhaps he was just metrosexual?


    Very like, very like, as someone would say.


    Stay'd it long?
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    Mar 30, 2009 2:39 PM GMT
    The world's earliest and most famous "clone" gay man?

    I can just see him now walking in a pride parade in leather chaps. icon_eek.gif
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    Mar 30, 2009 2:43 PM GMT
    I cant believe I'm saying this - as I myself am practically Casper himself - but I couldn't unless he got a tan.
  • Timbales

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    Mar 30, 2009 2:59 PM GMT
    no, he looks prissy
  • zakariahzol

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    Mar 30, 2009 3:03 PM GMT
    I dont know he is bi. Never heard of it. But its really great if that true. My favourite , got to be "King Lear" . I remember reading it as a child and feeling very sorry for the old King.
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    Mar 30, 2009 3:46 PM GMT
    zakariahzol saidI dont know he is bi.

    Look at Sonnet 130. After all the beautiful-young-man sonnets you get this:

    My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun
    Coral is far more red than her lips' red;
    If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun
    If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.


    And the best lines:

    And in some perfumes is there more delight
    Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks
    . [!]

    It looks like dating him would be a better bet than dating most other bi guys.
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    Mar 30, 2009 4:17 PM GMT
    theatrengym saidTrouble is that he was probably one of them intellectual snobs. That might have caused your revels to end before they really got started.


    Oh god no. Shakespeare, like Chaucer, was as bawdy and low-brow as they came. You just have to know how to look for all the fun innuendo and crude jokes.
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    Mar 30, 2009 4:23 PM GMT
    zdrew saidOh god no. Shakespeare, like Chaucer, was as bawdy and low-brow as they came. You just have to know how to look for all the fun innuendo and crude jokes.

    Speaking of Chaucer, did you know he was murdered? ....well, I aint telling. Ya gotta read the book. And who knew Terry Jones, of Monty Python, was a serious medieval scholar!

    whomurderedchaucer.jpg
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    Apr 02, 2009 12:20 AM GMT
    zdrew said
    theatrengym saidTrouble is that he was probably one of them intellectual snobs. That might have caused your revels to end before they really got started.


    Oh god no. Shakespeare, like Chaucer, was as bawdy and low-brow as they came. You just have to know how to look for all the fun innuendo and crude jokes.


    Oh, it was just an allusion, though not a literary one.