Water Aerobics

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 29, 2009 3:11 AM GMT
    Just curious.....Does any think that while water aerobics can be goofy--maybe more of a geriatric exercise--it is a useful tool for injury prevention and recovery?
  • Sayrnas

    Posts: 847

    Mar 29, 2009 12:02 PM GMT
    I like doing flips in the water! icon_biggrin.gif
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    Mar 29, 2009 1:00 PM GMT
    I had to give some thought to your question. The water aerobics classes I have seen are for people with multiple sclerosis and deforming rheumatoid arthritis. I know that some physical therapists in my area give hydro therapy to people with certain injuries. Logically it must be good for injury prevention and rehabilitation then. I found this article about water aerobics.

    http://www.diabetic-lifestyle.com/articles/jun01_burni_1.htm
    The activity doesn't have to be for wimps. There are all levels of intensity.

    Calories burned in 30 minutes
    * Land walking: 135 calories
    * Deep water walking; 264 calories
    * Jogging on land: 240 calories
    * Deep water jogging: 340 calories
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    Mar 29, 2009 1:30 PM GMT
    kneedraggen saidI had to give some thought to your question. The water aerobics classes I have seen are for people with multiple sclerosis and deforming rheumatoid arthritis. I know that some physical therapists in my area give hydro therapy to people with certain injuries. Logically it must be good for injury prevention and rehabilitation then. I found this article about water aerobics.

    http://www.diabetic-lifestyle.com/articles/jun01_burni_1.htm
    The activity doesn't have to be for wimps. There are all levels of intensity.

    Calories burned in 30 minutes
    * Land walking: 135 calories
    * Deep water walking; 264 calories
    * Jogging on land: 240 calories
    * Deep water jogging: 340 calories


    in college all the runner with injuries would waterjog
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    Mar 29, 2009 1:36 PM GMT
    I sometimes water jog 1000 yards (20 laps) as a break from swimming the laps. Good workout.......but gets a bit boring. I hum songs in my head.
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    Mar 29, 2009 3:29 PM GMT
    that's interesting, it's the first time i've heard of water jogging, how do you waterjog lol
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    Mar 29, 2009 3:31 PM GMT
    islandofisle saidthat's interesting, it's the first time i've heard of water jogging, how do you waterjog lol


    water jogging involves wearing this belt that floats and then you essentially stand and move like you are jogging which makes you slowly go across the pool. the athlete I knew didnt use the belts but that is a really really really intense workout
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    Mar 29, 2009 4:47 PM GMT
    All I know it swimming and lap swimming will whoop your ass .. moving through air is a lot easier .. unless you are a fish icon_lol.gif
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    Mar 29, 2009 7:09 PM GMT
    Hi Oden,

    I teach water fitness classes here and there are two types of classes generally - one during the day (usually around 9-10 am which is mostly 65+ aged women who come for the gossip and little else!) and the classes that attract the after work crowd - we had a noon class but it hasn't really generated much attention yet. Anyways, what I do in the evening class is this (great cardio workout btw) - we do a deep water class which you need to be in a pool that is 8 feet or deeper...you need the toys (aqua jogging belt, we use a beach ball, noodles, etc) and the really advanced people - mostly runners - will tread water while 'playing catch' with others in the deep end. It's a lot harder than it looks!

    Many people say that participants won't get much out of swimming or water exercise (in terms of fat loss, etc) but I don't know - the jury is still out on that. I have mainly seen people who prefer the land classes (kickboxing, Bosu, etc) and the ellipticals here are so busy that they're probably used for 12 hours straight. But even if you don't want to do the water classes and have time to get in the pool and do your own thing, that's great...anything to keep you from getting bored. It all depends on where you work out (here there are never any lanes open for a person to just do their own thing unless it's during the water classes) but you might find a better time to go when it's not so busy.

    Hope this helps, and if you have any questions, let me know!
  • HotCoach

    Posts: 247

    Mar 30, 2009 8:33 PM GMT
    I am an AEA certified "Aquasize" teacher and have worked with Dr. Igor Burdenko, the "founder of water therapy. He was a trainer with the Soviet Olympic team and defected to this counrty in the '80s. He had his first training center at Wayside Racquet and Swim Club ib Marlborough Mass where I was assistant Aquatics Director. At the time his practice involved many injured Red Sox and Celtic players. I work with him to rehab Rich Gedman, the former Sox catcher. I also work with well athletes who need something new and less stessful in their training. People with hip and knee replacement surgery are now a big part of my business here in Sun Valley, Idaho. I count Sen. John Kerry amongst my clients. Deep water allows for more range of motion than can be achieved on land with gravity.
    As far as water aerobics goes it has been hijacked by older and elderly women. I work both in deep and shallow water. Classes were first called rusty hindges. We keep our pool at 87 deg F. Good up tempo music and plenty of movement though some just come to socialize.
    Virtually no weight loss is achieved. Again little or no gravity. Little or no bone density achieved either. Same with swimming.

    Any more specif questions. let me know.

    Bob